APPENDIX
C

Biographical Sketches

WILLIAM O. BLACKWOOD is vice president with Hay Management Consultants and has over 25 years of human resource planning and management experience. He has directed and managed organizational and managerial analyses, planned and successfully implemented organizational change projects, designed and established total quality management (TQM) programs, and established successful strategic planning processes. He is currently working on the implementation and assessment of new work processes associated with strategic planning initiatives or TQM implementation efforts. He was the principal author and architect of the U.S. Army program called MANPRINT, which integrates manpower, personnel, training, system safety, health hazard assessment, and human factors into the system acquisition process in order to improve human performance, manpower utilization, and organizational effectiveness. Prior to joining Hay, he was the manager of the Human Systems Department of PRC Inc. He has Ph.D. and M.Ed. degrees in educational administration from the University of Florida, and a B.S. in psychology and education from Norwich University. He is a trustee for Norwich University, a fellow with the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society, and a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

TIMOTHY R. ANDERSON is on the staff of the Air Force Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as well as adjunct professor at the Air Force Institute of Technology and Wright State University. His research interests include speech recognition, speaker recognition and verification, auditory modeling for speech processing, binaural hearing, binaural speech



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--> APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches WILLIAM O. BLACKWOOD is vice president with Hay Management Consultants and has over 25 years of human resource planning and management experience. He has directed and managed organizational and managerial analyses, planned and successfully implemented organizational change projects, designed and established total quality management (TQM) programs, and established successful strategic planning processes. He is currently working on the implementation and assessment of new work processes associated with strategic planning initiatives or TQM implementation efforts. He was the principal author and architect of the U.S. Army program called MANPRINT, which integrates manpower, personnel, training, system safety, health hazard assessment, and human factors into the system acquisition process in order to improve human performance, manpower utilization, and organizational effectiveness. Prior to joining Hay, he was the manager of the Human Systems Department of PRC Inc. He has Ph.D. and M.Ed. degrees in educational administration from the University of Florida, and a B.S. in psychology and education from Norwich University. He is a trustee for Norwich University, a fellow with the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society, and a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. TIMOTHY R. ANDERSON is on the staff of the Air Force Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as well as adjunct professor at the Air Force Institute of Technology and Wright State University. His research interests include speech recognition, speaker recognition and verification, auditory modeling for speech processing, binaural hearing, binaural speech

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--> recognition, and neural networks. Anderson is the author of numerous papers and coeditor of Binaural and Spatial Hearing in Real and Virtual Environments. He has a B.S.E.E. from the University of Kentucky, an M.S.E.E. from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Dayton. C. THOMAS BENNETT retired from the Army after 20 years in the Medical R&D Command working on the behavioral neuropharmacology of nerve agent antidotes and radiation protective drugs; human factors analysis of large military systems and force structures; and virtual flight displays and the graphical information required for flight control. During the last five years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, he has been involved in developing the Department of Energy draft standards for human factors design methods; designing and testing tools to identify the risk factors that human operators and organizations bring to the disassembly of nuclear weapons; writing the human factors functional requirements for the next generation airport security checkpoints; and developing a human and organizational systems analytic basis for the Concept of Operations document that will be used to run the uranium enrichment plant being developed by the United States Enrichment Corporation. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in psychology from Michigan State University. JOHN R. CORSON is currently a consultant to the U.S. Army in the areas of training and test and evaluation. His experience is in the fields of acquisition and management, training development and operational test and evaluation, as well as operations research, training analysis and design and doctrine analysis. Corson previously was chief executive officer at Integrated Visual Learning, vice president of Mandex, Inc., and deputy commander, U.S. Army Operational Test and Evaluation Agency. He has a B.S. in industrial management from Drexel University and an M.B.A. in logistics management from Ohio State University. MICA R. ENDSLEY is currently visiting associate professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and associate professor of industrial engineering at Texas Tech University. She has been conducting research on situation awareness, decision making and automation in high-performance aircraft, and air traffic control and maintenance for the past 11 years. Prior to joining Texas Tech in 1990, she was an engineering specialist for the Northrop Corporation, serving as principal investigator of a research and development program focused on the areas of situation awareness, mental workload, expert systems, and interface design for the next generation of fighter cockpits. She has a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Southern California, with a specialization in human factors, and B.A. and M.A. degrees from Texas Tech University and Purdue University, respectively, both in industrial engineering. She has published extensively on the

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--> topic of situation awareness and designing for automation and is a registered professional ergonomist. PETER A. HANCOCK is associate professor at the University of Minnesota and director of the Human Factors Research Laboratory there. From 1983 to 1989 he was assistant professor in the Departments of Safety Science and Human Factors at the University of Southern California. His current research concerns operator strategies in performance under time stress and the application of safety and human factors principles to the design and implementation of advanced transportation systems. He has edited three books, Human Factors Psychology, Human Mental Workload, and Intelligent Interfaces: Theory, Research and Design, the latter two in association with Najmedin Meshkati and Mark Chignell. He is the coeditor of two forthcoming texts on the application of ecological principles to human factors. He has a B.Ed and M.Sc. from Loughborogh University with a focus on computer modeling of physiological systems. He received a Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Illinois, where his research concerned the human perception of time. JULIAN E. HOCHBERG is Centennial Professor Emeritus of psychology at Columbia University. His research interests include the perceptual integration of successive glances at objects and scenes; perception and attention; and pictorial perception and communication. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1980. He has an M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. JAMES E. HOFFMAN is professor of psychology at the University of Delaware. His research has been primarily in the area of visual attention and search using behavioral, electrophysiological, and eye movement recording approaches. In summer 1996, he was visiting research scientist at the Night Vision Laboratory in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, where he investigated eye fixation patterns during target detection in flare-illuminated scenes. His current work involves extending this approach to search and detection in thermal imagery. He has B.A. and M.A. degrees in psychology and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana. JERRY KIDD is senior adviser for the Committee on Human Factors and its various projects. He received a Ph.D. from Northwestern University in social psychology in 1956; he then joined RAND Corporation to help on a project to simulate air defense operations. He left RAND in late 1956 to join the staff at the Laboratory of Aviation Psychology at Ohio State University. There he worked under Paul Fitts and George Briggs until 1962, when he joined the staff of AAI, Incorporated, north of Baltimore, Maryland. In 1964, he moved to the National Science Foundation as program director for special projects. He joined the fac-

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--> ulty of the College of Library and Information Services at the University of Maryland in 1967 and retired in 1992. RONALD V. KRUK received a B.A. and M.A. in psychology from the University of Manitoba and a Ph.D. in applied psychology from Dalhousie University. He is currently manager of collaborative research and development programs at CAE Electronics Ltd., St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada. In prior military service with the Canadian Forces he was trained and served as a pilot on both fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters. Since joining CAE Kruk has been involved in the design and development of computer image generation systems and visual displays, including helmet-mounted displays for simulation, telerobotics, and enhanced/synthetic vision systems. His current responsibilities include design and coordination of research and development activity in human factors (controls and displays), vision (human performance) and training (training system analysis, requirements definition). ANNE MAVOR is study director for the Committee on Human Factors and its panels on tactical display systems for the individual soldier, human factors in air traffic control, and modeling human behavior and command decision making. Her previous work as a National Research Council senior staff officer includes studies of the scientific and technological challenges of virtual reality, emerging needs and opportunities for human factors research, modeling cost and performance of military enlistment, and others. For the past 25 years her work has concentrated on human factors, cognitive psychology, and information system design. Prior to joining the National Research Council she worked for the Essex Corporation, a human factors research firm, and served as a consultant to the College Board. She has an M.S. in experimental psychology from Purdue University.