Appendix A
AGENDA

Workshop on Priorities for Data on the Aging Population

Committee on National Statistics

Committee on Population

4–5 March 1996

National Academy of Sciences

Room 130

Green Building

2001 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.

Washington, D.C.

Monday, March 4

Part I

Introduction

 

9:00

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Dorothy Rice Richard Suzman Barbara Torrey

9:15

Purpose and Goals of Workshop

Dorothy Rice

9:25

Discussion of Findings and Recommendations of the 1988 CNSTAT Report, The Aging Population in the Twenty-First Century: Statistics for Health Policy

Dorothy Rice

 

(The chair will begin the discussion with a brief overview of the major findings and recommendations of the report. Commentary and discussion will follow.)



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OCR for page 39
Improving Data on America's Aging Population: Summary of a Workshop Appendix A AGENDA Workshop on Priorities for Data on the Aging Population Committee on National Statistics Committee on Population 4–5 March 1996 National Academy of Sciences Room 130 Green Building 2001 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. Monday, March 4 Part I Introduction   9:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks Dorothy Rice Richard Suzman Barbara Torrey 9:15 Purpose and Goals of Workshop Dorothy Rice 9:25 Discussion of Findings and Recommendations of the 1988 CNSTAT Report, The Aging Population in the Twenty-First Century: Statistics for Health Policy Dorothy Rice   (The chair will begin the discussion with a brief overview of the major findings and recommendations of the report. Commentary and discussion will follow.)

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Improving Data on America's Aging Population: Summary of a Workshop Part II How Will the Future Population at Older Ages Be Different?   This session will present the major scenarios for the aging population. The designated leader will begin with 10–15 minutes of commentary and the discussion will then be opened up for other participants to provide their comments and views. Discussions will focus on the important policy issues and the needed data to inform policy making. The goal of this part of the workshop is to take a visionary look toward anticipating what we need to know. Discussion will not be just about fairly immediate program-related needs, but more importantly about long-range data needs that will address major policy and research questions. 9:45 a.m. Major Demographic Trends in the Population at Older Ages Timothy Smeeding   (What are the major demographic, economic, and other social changes we will see as the population ages—in education, health, income and wealth, household composition, and living and income sharing arrangements?) 11:00 a.m. Health, Disability, and Functional Status Longevity and Quality of Life Beth Soldo   (What do we need to get better projections, as well as a better understanding of the forces underlying trends and racial and social differences?) 1:30 p.m Trends in Long-Term Care Robyn Stone 2:30 p.m. Health Care: Delivery, Organization, and Financing Marilyn Moon   (Discussion topics will include trends in managed care, block grants for Medicaid, proportion of family budgets spent on health care, and health utilization and expenditures.) 3:45 p.m. The Baby Boomers Face Retirement: Health, Wealth, and Demography Mike Hurd   (What changes do we expect, for example, in labor force participation of the elderly, in savings of the future elderly, and in inter-generational transfers as the low-fertility high-divorce cohorts age?)

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Improving Data on America's Aging Population: Summary of a Workshop 4:45 p.m. Research Opportunities with Current and Potential Surveys Robert Wallace   (Topics to be covered include lineages, genetic markers, tertiary prevention.) 5:30 p.m. Adjourn   Tuesday, March 5 9:00 a.m. Rapporteur's Review of Major Issues and Identified Data Needs Deborah Carr Anu Pemmarazu Part III Taking Stock of Current Surveys to Meet Future Needs 9:45 a.m. How Current Surveys or Modifications to Them Meet the Needs Dorothy Rice   (HRS, AHEAD, NLTCS, LSOA, SOAII, NHIS, and other surveys)     This session will be structured as a roundtable discussion. Specifically, the chair will call upon each of the survey representatives to speak about their respective surveys in the context of Part II and the important needs that are fulfilled by the survey, how the survey can be used as an instrument to meet future data needs and inform policy, and what the potentials are for data linkage. Part IV Methods to Fill the Gaps   11:00 a.m. The Future Environment for Data Collection     The Federal Statistical System Katherine Wallman   Organization and budgets     Confidentiality and data sharing     Consolidation of household surveys     Continuous measurement     Interagency collaboration     New responsibilities for states  

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Improving Data on America's Aging Population: Summary of a Workshop 1:00 p.m. Suggestions for Improvements in Data Collection Robert Hauser   (This session will cover data linkages, models, collection methodologies, administrative records, consolidation of surveys, continuous measurement.)   This discussion will be structured similarly to Part I: the leader will begin with 10–15 minutes of introductory comments, and the discussion will then be open for comments from participants. Part V Conclusions   2:00 p.m. Summary and Conclusions Dorothy Rice   (This session will review of population trends and policy issues, identified data needs, and current or potential data sources.)