About the Authors

Paul V. Ellefson (Chair) is a professor of forest policy and administration at the University of Minnesota where he has taught since 1975. Dr. Ellefson has extensive experience as chair of various state, national, and international forest policy initiatives. He currently is chair of the Minnesota Governor's Forest Resources Council. He is the author of four books on forest resource policy and has traveled extensively throughout the forested regions of the world. Ellefson is a Fellow of the Society of American Foresters and is a recipient of a Norwegian Marshall Fund Award. Dr. Ellefson received his academic training at Michigan State University and the universities of Michigan, Minnesota, and New Mexico.

James K. Agee is a professor of forest ecology at the University of Washington where he has worked since 1978. His research interests include the role of fire in natural ecosystems and the management of natural disturbances in park ecosystems. Dr. Agee is a member of the Ecological Society of America and the Forest Historical Society. He received his Ph.D. in wildland resource science in 1973 from the University of California–Berkeley.

Keith A. Argow is president of the National Woodland Owners Association and also president of American Resources, Inc. (a nationwide forestry support organization). He was formerly a research forester and a district ranger with the U.S. Forest Service, and associate professor of forestry at Virginia Tech. Dr. Argow earned his Ph.D. in forestry and political science from North Carolina State University with additional degrees from Colorado College (economics) and the University of Michigan (forestry). He is a Fellow of the Society of American Foresters and a member of Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society.



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--> About the Authors Paul V. Ellefson (Chair) is a professor of forest policy and administration at the University of Minnesota where he has taught since 1975. Dr. Ellefson has extensive experience as chair of various state, national, and international forest policy initiatives. He currently is chair of the Minnesota Governor's Forest Resources Council. He is the author of four books on forest resource policy and has traveled extensively throughout the forested regions of the world. Ellefson is a Fellow of the Society of American Foresters and is a recipient of a Norwegian Marshall Fund Award. Dr. Ellefson received his academic training at Michigan State University and the universities of Michigan, Minnesota, and New Mexico. James K. Agee is a professor of forest ecology at the University of Washington where he has worked since 1978. His research interests include the role of fire in natural ecosystems and the management of natural disturbances in park ecosystems. Dr. Agee is a member of the Ecological Society of America and the Forest Historical Society. He received his Ph.D. in wildland resource science in 1973 from the University of California–Berkeley. Keith A. Argow is president of the National Woodland Owners Association and also president of American Resources, Inc. (a nationwide forestry support organization). He was formerly a research forester and a district ranger with the U.S. Forest Service, and associate professor of forestry at Virginia Tech. Dr. Argow earned his Ph.D. in forestry and political science from North Carolina State University with additional degrees from Colorado College (economics) and the University of Michigan (forestry). He is a Fellow of the Society of American Foresters and a member of Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society.

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--> Jeanne Nienaber Clarke is a professor of political science at the University of Arizona. She specializes in American politics, the history of natural resources policy in the United States, and organizational behavior. Her several books include a biography of former Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes and a comparative study of federal resource managing agencies. Dr. Clarke is active in the American Political Science Association, the American Association of University Women, and Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California–Berkeley. Preston D. Cole is the forester for the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Mr. Cole is an expert in the management of urban ecosystems and was the first African-American hired as a forester by the Missouri Department of Conservation. He received his educational training in forestry and agronomy at the University of Missouri. Dominick A. DellaSala has served as the Director of Forest Conservation at the World Wildlife Fund since 1993. His responsibilities include developing and managing the organization's temperate forest and carnivore conservation programs in the western United States and Canada. He has been active in many conservation efforts across the country including forest certification, landscape ecology, endangered species, and ecosystem conservation. Dr. DellaSala received his Ph.D. in natural resources from the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor in 1986. Henry Gholz is professor of forest ecology and graduate coordinator at the University of Florida's School of Forest Resources and Conservation. In addition to his teaching and research responsibilities. Dr. Gholz holds affiliate appointments in the College of Natural Resources and Environment, the Center for Latin American Studies, and the Center for African Studies. In 1994–95 he was selected as a Science and Engineering Diplomacy Fellow for the U.S. Agency for International Development by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Gholz received his Ph.D. in forest ecology/science from Oregon State University in 1979. J. Keith Gilless is an associate professor at the College of Natural Resources at the University of California – Berkeley. His research studies include fire management on public and private lands and forest management issues on tribal lands. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin. Perry R. Hagenstein is a consultant who works with government and industry on resource policy and management issues. He is also president of the Institute for Forest Analysis, Planning and Policy, a nonprofit research and education organization. He has served on many resource-related boards and committees

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--> such as the American Forestry Association and the New England Natural Resource Center. Dr. Hagenstein received his Ph.D. in forest and natural resource economics from the University of Michigan in 1963. Neil D. Hamilton is a professor of law and director of the Agricultural Law Center at Drake University Law School in Des Moines, Iowa, where he has taught for 14 years. He is a past president of the American Agricultural Law Association and in 1996 he received the association's distinguished service award. Professor Hamilton has an undergraduate degree in forestry from Iowa State University and in 1996 he was awarded the College of Agriculture's "Innovator in Agriculture" award. James E. Hubbard has served as the state forester for the Colorado State Forest Service since 1984. Mr. Hubbard has been actively involved in local, state, and regional efforts to address questions in the management of private forests. Mr. Hubbard served as president of the National Association of State Foresters (1990) and American Forests (1996). Keith Ross is a vice president and the director of land protection for the New England Forestry Foundation, a 52-year-old private, nonprofit owner of over 18,000 acres of forestland whose mission is to protect New England's working forests through land conservation, education, and regional forest policy. Mr. Ross is a forester and holds a Masters of environmental law from Vermont Law School. John T. Shannon has served as the Arkansas state forester since 1994. He has also practiced law and has worked with state forestry agencies in Florida, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. He received his Master of forestry degree from Duke University in 1980 and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Arkansas–Little Rock in 1989. Ronald L. Trosper is professor and director of the Native American Forestry Program at the Northern Arizona University. His research interests include the study of tribal management of natural resources on reservations. Dr. Trosper is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1974.

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