Box 7-1
Most to Least Commonly Used State Programs to Influence Private Forestry Practices, 1992

 

Most (1) to Least (6) Used State Program to Promote Forest Practices

Focus of Program and Practices

Educational Program

Technical Assistance

Voluntary Guidelines

Tax Incentives

Fiscal Incentives

Regulatory Program

Protect Water Quality

2

1

3

6

4

5

Promote Reforestation

1a

1a

5

4

3

6

Improve Timber Harvesting

2

1

3

6

5

4

Protect From Wildlife, Insects & Diseases

1

2

4

6

5

3

Protect Wildlife & Rare & Endangered Species

1

2

5

6

3

4

Enhance Recreation & Aesthetic Qualities

2

1

4

5b

3

5b

a Educational and technical assistance programs tied (ranked 1) in frequency of use to promote reforestation.

b Tax incentive and regulatory programs tied (ranked 5) in frequency of use to enhance recreation and aesthetic qualities.

Source: Ellefson et al. 1995.

forests. The ''tree-farm program," begun in western Washington in 1942, certifies forest property, an action that makes property owners eligible for forest-industry-sponsored technical and financial assistance. In the late 1980s, over 7 million acres of nonindustrial private forest were eligible. Tree-farm members number 70,000 (including inactive members). In the early 1990s, the program's scope was broadened to reflect other interests, especially interests in wildlife, recreation, water, and wood. The standards for tree-farm management were also upgraded to ensure that each of those four resources was addressed. From an industrial perspective, the program has been supplemented by corporate "fiber farms," which focus on fiber production. Other private initiatives to enhance the use and management of forests include the American Pulpwood Association's "pilot forests" and the joint industry-government "family-forests" programs.



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