Appendix CBiographical Sketches of Committee Members

Larry W. Canter, who chaired the committee, is the Sun Company Chair of Ground Water Hydrology, and Director of the Environmental and Ground Water Institute at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering from Vanderbilt University, an M.S. in sanitary engineering from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Health Engineering from the University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Canter's research has addressed a wide range of technical and policy issues relating to ground water quality and quantity. He has published over 110 papers in referred journals or conference proceedings and is author of over 135 research reports. Dr. Canter is a former member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board and the Governor of Oklahoma's Coordinating Committee on Water Resources Research. He served as associate editor of Environmental Professional and on the International Advisory Board of EIA Review. He was a principal contributor to the WSTB's 1989 colloquium on "Ground Water and Soil Contamination Remediation: Toward Compatible Science, Policy, and Public Perception."

Charles W. Abdalla is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology at Pennsylvania State University. He earned his B.S. in environmental resource management from Pennsylvania State University, and his M.A. in economics, M.S. in agricultural economics, and



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Valuing Ground Water: Economic Concepts and Approaches Appendix CBiographical Sketches of Committee Members Larry W. Canter, who chaired the committee, is the Sun Company Chair of Ground Water Hydrology, and Director of the Environmental and Ground Water Institute at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering from Vanderbilt University, an M.S. in sanitary engineering from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Health Engineering from the University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Canter's research has addressed a wide range of technical and policy issues relating to ground water quality and quantity. He has published over 110 papers in referred journals or conference proceedings and is author of over 135 research reports. Dr. Canter is a former member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board and the Governor of Oklahoma's Coordinating Committee on Water Resources Research. He served as associate editor of Environmental Professional and on the International Advisory Board of EIA Review. He was a principal contributor to the WSTB's 1989 colloquium on "Ground Water and Soil Contamination Remediation: Toward Compatible Science, Policy, and Public Perception." Charles W. Abdalla is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology at Pennsylvania State University. He earned his B.S. in environmental resource management from Pennsylvania State University, and his M.A. in economics, M.S. in agricultural economics, and

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Valuing Ground Water: Economic Concepts and Approaches Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Michigan State University. His research and extension programs address public choice about natural resources and the environment. His recent studies include the economic assessment of institutions for water management, measuring ground water values, and implications of industrialization of the U.S. food system for environmental policy design. He has written several book chapters, articles, and reviews, his work appearing in journals such as American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Land Economics, and Water Resources Bulletin. Also he served as guest editor of an award-winning issue of the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation entitled "Rural Groundwater Quality Management: Emerging Issues and Public Policies for the 1990s." Dr. Abdalla is the co-founder of the Pennsylvania Groundwater Policy Education Project and has worked with organizations at the national, state, and local levels to inform citizens and public officials and increase their involvement in water resources decision-making. He is a recipient of the Gilbert White Fellowship awarded by Resources for the Future and the Berg Fellowship awarded by the Soil and Water Conservation Society. Richard M. Adams is a professor of agricultural and resource economics at Oregon State University, Corvallis. He holds a B.S. in resource management, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of California, Davis. His current research interests include economic assessments of the effects of environmental change on agricultural and natural ecosystems, assessments of agricultural costs and social benefits of reducing ground water pollution from agriculture, valuation of water across competing uses, and valuation of fish and wildlife resources. He has served as associate editor of Water Resources Research, editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and chair of the Policy Sciences Committee of the American Geophysical Union's Hydrology Section. Dr. Adams is author of approximately 200 publications and has provided consulting services on numerous natural resource assessment projects. J. David Aiken is a professor of water and agricultural law at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He is a lawyer and has written extensively on ground water policy, including topics such as the depletion of the Ogallala aquifer, ground water protection, and conjunctive use. He has made extensive study of the various approaches to ground water allocation and protection taken in the western states. In addition, he has served as a legal consultant in the development of Nebraska's recharge appropriation legislation, and on a variety of agricultural and water law cases. He was a member of the Nebraska Water Independence Congress, and currently serves on the Water Quality Technical Advisory Committee of the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality.

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Valuing Ground Water: Economic Concepts and Approaches Sandra O. Archibald earned her B.A. and M.S. in Public Policy from the University of California at Berkeley, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California at Davis. She is an associate professor of public affairs and planning at the University of Minnesota. Her research on the economic valuation of water resources has been conducted primarily in California where she heads a large study examining the impacts of changing federal water policy on ground water value. Her research has addressed issues such as ground water and surface water interactions, spatial and temporal dimensions, institutional roles, surrogate use indicators, and sustainability. In addition, she has examined economic issues related to irrigation drainage in the San Joaquin Valley, and the economic impacts associated with the ecological effects of ground water mining. Dr. Archibald has also published in the area of pesticide use and associated economic benefits and health risks. She is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association, and has served on committees of the Transportation Research Board and Institute of Medicine. Susan Capalbo is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics at Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. She has also held positions at the University of California, Davis; Resources for the Future; the University of Maryland; and the National Marine Fisheries Service. Dr. Capalbo's current research examines the interface among agricultural practices and the environment, with a specific emphasis on ground water, surface water, erosion, and farm worker health. She has served as director of the Western Agricultural Economics Association and associate editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. She is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association, American Economic Association, Canadian Economic Association, Western Agricultural Economics Association, and Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. She recently won the Outstanding Journal Article Award in the Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. Patrick A. Domenico (a committee member through November 1995) is the David B. Harris Professor of Geology at Texas A&M University's College Station Campus where he specializes in teaching and research in ground water hydrology. He earned his B.S. in geology and M.S. in engineering geology from Syracuse University, and his Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Nevada. Dr. Domenico has authored more than 40 professional publications, including a textbook on ground water hydrology. He has consulted on projects dealing with hydrologic, ground water supply, geothermal, and environmental issues for many private and governmental organizations including the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, DuPont Chemical Company, and the Edison Electric Institute. He has re-

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Valuing Ground Water: Economic Concepts and Approaches ceived many prestigious awards, including the Birdsall Distinguished Lecturer in Hydrogeology, the Distinguished Teaching Award from the College of Geoscience, and the Distinguished Teaching Award from Texas A&M University. Peter G. Hubbell has formed a private consulting firm, Water Resource Associates, Inc., focusing on water resource engineering and planning. He was formerly Executive Director of the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD). He holds a B.S. in Water Resource Management from the University of Maryland, and completed the Program for Senior Executives at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. At the SWFWMD he was responsible for the development of water resource programs and overall management of District operations. He has also held positions as a water resource analyst with a major environmental and engineering consulting firm, with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and with the U.S. Geological Survey. He was the chair of Florida's Bluebelt Commission on Aquifer Recharge, a founding member of the International Water Resource Network's Policy Council, a member of the board of the Florida Conflict Resolution Consortium, and holds memberships in the American Water Resources Association, American Water Works Association, and Interstate Council on Water Policy. Katharine L. Jacobs is the Director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources Tucson Active Management Area. She holds a B.A. in Biology from Middlebury College, and an M.L.A. in environmental planning from the University of California, Berkeley. As Director of the Tucson Active Management Area, she is involved in ground water policy development and coordination, and consensus building in solving water resource management problems. She represents southern Arizona in statewide water issues and works with community leaders and other agencies to address a variety of local resource problems. She was a primary author in the development of Arizona's "assured and adequate water supply" rules. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Southern Arizona Water Resources Association and the Tucson Regional Water Council; and is a member of the Arizona Hydrologic Society, American Water Works Association, and American Water Resources Association. Aaron L. Mills is a professor of environmental sciences at the University of Virginia. He earned his B.A. in biology from Ithaca College, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in soil science, with minors in microbiology and ecology, from Cornell University. Dr. Mills' areas of research address the transport of bacteria through porous media and biogeochemical reactions pertinent to ground water systems and he has over 80 professional publications. He has

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Valuing Ground Water: Economic Concepts and Approaches served as the chair of the aquatic and terrestrial microbiology section of the American Society for Microbiology and is an active member of the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Geophysical Union. He has also served as a member of the editorial board of Applied and Environmental Microbiology and Microbial Ecology. He has also served as a consultant on a number of sites where bioremediation efforts have been proposed and undertaken. William R. Mills, Jr. has been the General Manager of the Orange County Water District (OCWD) since the fall of 1987. OCWD is responsible for management of the ground water basin in northern Orange County. Prior to his appointment at OCWD, Mills was a private consulting engineer between 1984 and 1987, specializing in water resources management, surface and ground water investigations, water quality, and water rights. From 1967 to 1984 Mills was employed by PRC Engineering, Inc. in Santa Ana, California in technical capacities up to and including President of the Planning and Development Division. Prior to joining PRC Engineering, Inc., Mills worked for the California Department of Water Resources and Los Angeles County Flood Control District. He is a graduate geological engineer from the Colorado School of Mines, with an M.S. degree in civil engineering from Loyola University of Los Angeles, and is a registered engineer and geologist. Paul V. Roberts is the Clair Peck Professor of Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and an M.S. in environmental engineering from Stanford University. His research focuses on the transport and fate of contaminants in subsurface porous media, as well as water treatment technology. Previously, he headed the engineering department of the Swiss Federal Institute of Water Supply and Water Pollution Control. He has also worked as a research engineer at Stanford Research Institute, and as a process engineer at Chevron Research Company. He was a member of the WSTB's Committee on Ground Water Clean-Up Alternatives and has served three terms on the Environmental Engineering Committee of EPA's Science Advisory Board. Thomas C. Schelling is a Distinguished Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and the Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Political Economy, Emeritus, at Harvard University. He earned an A.B. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. He has served in the U.S. Bureau of the Budget, the Economic Cooperation Administration in Europe, and the White House Executive Office of the President. He joined the faculty at Harvard University after serving five years on the faculty at Yale University. He is a

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Valuing Ground Water: Economic Concepts and Approaches member of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. Dr. Schelling currently serves as a member of the NRC's Commission of Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. Theodore Tomasi is a Research Scientist in the College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware, and a Principal in the consulting firm Environmental Economics Research Group. He earned his B.A. in environment and public policy and an M.A. in economics from the University of Colorado, and a Ph.D. in natural resource economics from the University of Michigan. Dr. Tomasi's research focuses on environmental economics with special emphasis on methods for assessing the value of nonmarket goods and services. Prior to joining the University of Delaware, he held positions at the University of Minnesota, University of Michigan, and Michigan State University. He has served as a consultant on various issues of conducting natural resource damage assessments to NOAA, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Department of Justice, the State of Michigan, and the State of Florida.