APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches

AMY ONG TSUI is professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health of the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She also directs the EVALUATION Project of the Carolina Population Center, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. She was previously associate director of the Community and Family Study Center at the University of Chicago and assistant research officer for the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. Her research has dealt with a wide variety of topics related to family planning programs, contraceptive use, child health, and family formation in Asia and Africa. She received B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Hawaii and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago.

JUDITH N. WASSERHEIT is the director of the Division of STD Prevention in the National Center for HIV, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has worked extensively in Asia, as well as in selected countries in Africa and Latin America. She is a member of the executive board of the American Venereal Disease Association and the board of the International Society for STD Research. Her research has included clinical and epidemiological aspects of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV prevention, particularly in relation to women's health. She has a B.A. degree from Princeton University, an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School, and an M.P.H. degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.



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Reproductive Health in Developing Countries: Expanding Dimensions, Building Solutions APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches AMY ONG TSUI is professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health of the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She also directs the EVALUATION Project of the Carolina Population Center, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. She was previously associate director of the Community and Family Study Center at the University of Chicago and assistant research officer for the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. Her research has dealt with a wide variety of topics related to family planning programs, contraceptive use, child health, and family formation in Asia and Africa. She received B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Hawaii and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. JUDITH N. WASSERHEIT is the director of the Division of STD Prevention in the National Center for HIV, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has worked extensively in Asia, as well as in selected countries in Africa and Latin America. She is a member of the executive board of the American Venereal Disease Association and the board of the International Society for STD Research. Her research has included clinical and epidemiological aspects of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV prevention, particularly in relation to women's health. She has a B.A. degree from Princeton University, an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School, and an M.P.H. degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.

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Reproductive Health in Developing Countries: Expanding Dimensions, Building Solutions ALAKA MALWADE BASU is senior research associate at the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University. Her major research work is in the social and cultural context of demographic behavior and the political context of population research and policy, especially the interrelationships between women's status and demographic behavior. She has done extensive field research in India. She served as the chair of the Scientific Committee on Anthropological Demography of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. She earned B.Sc. degrees in biochemistry from the Universities of Bombay and London, and an M.Sc. degree in medical demography from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. JOSE LUIS BOBADILLA was principal health specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) before his death in October 1996. Before joining the IADB, he had been senior health specialist at the World Bank, a center director at the Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica in Mexico City, and professor in the medical faculty of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. His recent work included helping developing countries use analyses of disease burden and cost-effectiveness of interventions to plan health programs. His research interests included the epidemiologic transition in Latin America and the effectiveness of obstetric and perinatal services. He completed his medical studies at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and earned an M.S. degree in community medicine and a Ph.D. degree in health care epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. (Please see Dedication to this volume.) WILLARD CATES, JR., is senior vice president of Biomedical Affairs, Family Health International (FHI), North Carolina, and visiting professor of epidemiology at several universities. Prior to joining FHI, he was at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he served as Director of the Division of STD/HIV Prevention for 9 years. While at CDC, he also directed the Division of Training, overseeing the Epidemic Intelligence Service and Preventive Medicine Residency. He is past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and co-author of two major reproductive health textbooks. He received an undergraduate degree from Yale University; a masters degree in history from Kings College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, England; and a combined M.D.M.P.H. degree from Yale School of Medicine. He trained clinically in internal medicine at the University of Virginia Hospital. CHRISTOPHER J. ELIAS is a senior associate in the International Programs Division of the Population Council and serves as country representative for the Population Council in Thailand, responsible for activities in

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Reproductive Health in Developing Countries: Expanding Dimensions, Building Solutions Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), and Laos. His interests include reproductive health, family planning operations research, expansion of contraceptive choice, gender and development research, and institutional strengthening. In conjunction with the Population Council's Center for Biomedical Research, he also coordinates efforts to develop woman-controlled vaginal microbicides. He received an M.D. degree from Creighton University, completed postgraduate training in internal medicine at the University of California San Francisco, and received a M.P.H. degree from the University of Washington, where he was a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. JOHN G. HAAGA is the staff director for the Committee on Population of the National Research Council. Previously, he directed the MCH-Family Planning Extension Project at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Bangladesh. He has also been a policy analyst in the Social Policy Department of RAND, working on health care, immunization, and demographic surveys in the United States, Malaysia, and Indonesia. From 1982 to 1985 he was Deputy Director of the Nutritional Surveillance Program at Cornell University, working on nutrition surveys and nutrition policy research in Africa. He received master's degrees in modern history from Oxford University and in international relations from Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. degree in public policy from the RAND Graduate School. MARJORIE A. KOBLINSKY is director of the MotherCare Project with John Snow, Inc. Her interest and work in women's reproductive health began with her biochemical research and has included positions with the Ford Foundation, the Asia Regional Office of International Development Research Centre, and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. Her current research interests include maternal mortality and morbidity and measurement issues. She was awarded a B.S. degree in chemistry by Simmons College and a Ph.D. degree in biochemistry by Columbia University. PIERRE MERCENIER recently retired as professor at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium. He had previously served as a medical officer for the World Health Organization, working on the national tuberculosis control program in India; as a physician in Rwanda, Burundi, and Zaire; as a researcher at the Scientific and Medical Centre of the Free University of Brussels in Kasongo, Zaire; and as a consultant for the World Health Organization and several bilateral aid agencies in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. His research has focused on the organization and evaluation of health services. He holds the Licence Speciale in public health and a medical degree from the Free University of Brussels,

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Reproductive Health in Developing Countries: Expanding Dimensions, Building Solutions the Diploma of Tropical Medicine from the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, and certificates and aggregation in pneumophtisiology from the Faculty of Medicine in Paris. MARK R. MONTGOMERY is associate professor of economics at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, and associate at the Population Council. He has also served as senior fellow in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, and as assistant professor at the Office of Population Research, Princeton University. He is a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Population and of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Unintended Pregnancies. His published research includes economic analyses of marriage, contraception, and fertility, studies of child health, and work on urban growth and migration in Africa. He earned a B.A. degree from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Michigan. SUSAN E. PICK is president of the Mexican Institute for Family and Population Research (IMIFAP) and professor of social psychology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). As founder and president of IMIFAP, she has directed the development, implementation, and evaluation of integrated sex and family life education programs for children, adolescents, parents, and health and education professionals, as well as programs in AIDS prevention, advocacy and policy, teacher training, public opinion and educational materials in nine Latin American countries, Greece, and with Latinos in the United States. Since 1984 she has held the title of National Researcher in Mexico, and in 1991 she received the National University Award for Young Academics in Social Science Research from UNAM. She has a B.Sc. degree in social psychology from the London School of Economics and Political Science of the University of London and a Ph.D. degree from the University of London. ALLAN ROSENFIELD is DeLamar professor and dean of the Columbia School of Public Health. An international expert in women's reproductive health, family planning, population, and international health, he is a member of the Institute of Medicine, diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He serves on the boards or committees of a broad array of population, health, and science organizations, including the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Health Organization, the Institute of Medicine, the National Council on International Health, the New York State and New York City Departments of Health, and

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Reproductive Health in Developing Countries: Expanding Dimensions, Building Solutions several local New York City and State non-profit organizations. He has served as president of the New York Obstetrical Society and chair of the executive board of the American Public Health Association and is currently chair of the Alan Guttmacher Institute and president of the Association of Schools of Public Health. He holds undergraduate degrees from Harvard University and an M.D. from Columbia University. HELEN SAXENIAN is senior economist in the Population, Health, and Nutrition Department of the World Bank. She has worked on health policy and agricultural projects in Latin America and was a coauthor of the 1993 World Development Report, Investing in Health. She has written both research reports and sectoral reviews of women's reproductive health and child nutrition in Brazil and Venezuela. She holds a B.A. degree in economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. degree in applied economics from Stanford University. JAMES TRUSSELL is professor of economics and public affairs, director of the Office of Population Research, and associate dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs at Princeton University. His research deals primarily with demographic methodology and reproductive health. In recent years he has published extensively on contraceptive technology, including the safety and efficacy of emergency contraceptives. He is a former member of the National Research Council Committee on Population and was co-chair of the Panel on Data and Research Needs for AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the board of directors of the Population Association of America and the Alan Guttmacher Institute. He has a B.S. degree in mathematics from Davidson College, a B.Phil. degree in economics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Princeton University. HUDA ZURAYK is senior associate in the Population Council Regional Office for West Asia and North Africa in Cairo. She is responsible for the reproductive health program and coordinates the Reproductive Health Working Group (RHWG), a regional interdisciplinary network of research scholars in reproductive health. Members of the RHWG in Egypt undertook the Giza Morbidity Study, which has contributed to drawing attention to the magnitude of gynecological and related morbidity in developing countries. She is currently member of the Council of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. She is also visiting professor at the Faculty of Health Sciences of the American University of Beirut, where she served as full-time faculty member from 1974 to 1987. She holds a Ph.D degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health.

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