Cover Image

HARDBACK
$52.95



View/Hide Left Panel

TABLE 5–1 Population-Based Age-Specific Health Status (quality adjustment weights)

Age Group

Males

Females

Combined

<1

 

 

0.92

1–4

 

 

0.92

5–14

 

 

0.92

15–24

0.93

0.92

0.92

25–34

0.93

0.92

0.92

35–44

0.92

0.91

0.92

45–54

0.89

0.87

0.88

55–64

0.87

0.86

0.86

65–74

0.85

0.83

0.84

75–84

0.81

0.76

0.78

≥85

0.71

0.64

0.66

NOTE: Values are based on the overall population (both household and institutionalized); combined values calculated as weighted average of male and female values (weights from distribution of U.S. population); no direct estimates were made for population younger than age 15, values for ages 15–24 were assumed to apply.

SOURCE: Wolfson, 1996.

Establish Age-Specific Incidence and Death Rates

Estimates of current age-specific incidence and mortality for each condition were assembled. Rates and numbers of cases and deaths were estimated for the following age groups: under 1 year, 1–4, 5–14, 15–24, 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and ≥85.

Although some of the conditions included in the analysis (e.g., Lyme disease [caused by Borrelia burgdorferi], gonorrhea, shigellosis, and tuberculosis) are designated as “reportable” and numbers of reported cases are published by the CDC (1994), the completeness of reporting varies by condition, reflecting both undiagnosed cases and incomplete reporting of diagnosed cases. Separate surveillance programs by CDC and others for conditions such as tuberculosis are the basis for some estimates of incidence. In the absence of surveillance programs, some estimates have been based on data from state- or community-level studies. Others rest largely on expert judgment. The specific sources of data for each condition are described in the Appendixes.

It is important to emphasize that the analysis uses incidence data, that is, the number (or rate) of new cases that would be expected during 1 year. For chronic illnesses such as multiple sclerosis, these data will differ from the prevalence estimates that are often reported.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement