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Although the number of cases of disease are much higher in children under 5 years of age, the largest number of lost QALYs are associated with disease in people 65 years of age and older. This discrepancy is caused by the much higher mortality rate and more severe morbidity in the older individuals compared to younger people.

If a vaccine program for S. pneumoniae were implemented today and the vaccine was 100% efficacious and utilized by 100% of the target population, the annualized present value of the health care costs saved would be $1.6 billion. Using committee assumptions of less-than-ideal efficacy and utilization and including time and monetary costs until a vaccine program is implemented, the annualized present value of the health care costs saved would be $815 million.

If a vaccine program for S. pneumoniae were implemented today and the vaccine was 100% efficacious and utilized by 100% of the target population, the annualized present value of the program cost would be $1.1 billion. Using committee assumptions of less-than-ideal efficacy and utilization and including time and monetary costs until a vaccine program is implemented, the annualized present value of the program cost would be $675 million.

Using committee assumptions of time and costs until licensure, the fixed cost of vaccine development has been amortized and is $7.2 million for a S. pneumoniae vaccine.

If a vaccine program were implemented today and the vaccine was 100% efficacious and utilized by 100% of the target population, the annualized present value of the cost per QALY gained is -$2,000. A negative value represents a saving in costs in addition to a saving in QALYs. Using committee assumptions of less-than-ideal utilization and including time and monetary costs until a vaccine program is implemented, the annualized present value of the cost per QALY gained is $1,000.

See Chapters 4 and 5 for details on the methods and assumptions used by the committee for the results reported.

READING LIST

Baron RC, Dicker RC, Bussell, KE, et al. Assessing Trends in Mortality in 121 U.S. Cities, 1970–79, from All Causes and from Pneumonia and Influenza. Public Health Reports 1988; 103:120–128.

Breiman RF, Spika JS, Navarro VJ, et al. Pneumococcal Bacteremia in Charleston County, South Carolina: A Decade Later. Archives of Internal Medicine 1990; 150: 1401–1405.


CDC. Defining the Public Health Impact of Drug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: Report of a Working Group. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1996; 45:1–2.

CDC. Increasing Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates Among Patients of a National Health-Care Alliance—United States, 1993. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1995; 44:741–742.



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