TABLE 3.1 Projected Volume (in Terabytes) of Satellite Remote Sensing Data Holdings at the U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, 1997 to 2005

Data Source

By 1997

By 1998

By 1999

By 2000

By 2001

By 2005

Landstats 1-5

120.5

122.5

122.5

122.5

122.5

122.5

AVHRRa

12.5

16.5

20.5

24.5

28.5

40.0

SIR-Cb

20.0

90.0

90.0

90.0

90.0

90.0

Landstat 7

20.0

70.0

120.0

170.0

170.0

SRTMc

112.0

113.0

114.0

117.0

MODISd

10.0

36.0

62.0

88.0

166.0

ASTERe

15.0

60.0

110.0

160.0

310.0

TOTAL

153.0

274.0`

511.0

642.0

773.0

1,215.5

a AVHRR—Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

b SIR-C—Shuttle Imaging Radar-C

c SRTM—Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

d MODIS—Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

e ASTER—Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer

SOURCE: U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division.

Management Center. Table 3.3 provides a representative sample of astrophysics data archived by NASA and demonstrates a similar trend in the space sciences.

Technology for data storage and computation continues to improve at a rate consistent with the capability to handle the rapid growth of accumulated data in the observational sciences. Scientists worldwide will have to adapt their research strategies to make effective use of these new data.12 Although state-of-the-art projects can manage the increasingly large data volumes, perhaps with difficulty, other users, especially in developing countries, are unlikely to be able to access or effectively use such data for their own research.

Development of Large International Research Programs

As the previous discussion indicates, basic scientific research has become ever more internationalized as a result of several factors: the expanding capabilities of communication and computation networks, the capabilities for conducting high-quality science in increasing numbers of countries, and the economic driving force for sharing the high costs of large projects. These factors have led to the formation of new organizational paradigms and methods of data management. Consequences of this internationalization have been more and higher-quality science, faster progress, and ever more international involvement. These opportunities have appeared at all levels, from individual investigator and small-group science to large-scale "big science" projects.



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