TABLE 6-8 Excess Years of Life Lost, by Region, Sex, Age Group, and Cause, 1990 Region

 

Group I

Group II

Group III

All Causes

North FSE

Males

0-14

865,083

373,834

313,983

1,552,862

15-59

18,815

3,231,019

2,967,022

6,216,820

60+

-43,270

1,744,205

121,496

1,822.418

Females

0-14

558,821

270,845

154,463

984,168

15-59

37,884

1,072,697

362,978

1,473,591

60+

-119,316

1,877,736

57,227

1.815.649

Central Asia

Males

0-14

1,317,594

117,276

110,491

1,545,363

15-59

7,745

166,488

183,483

9,248

60+

-1,302

62,467

630

61,795

Females

0-14

1,030,529

88,042

73,690

1,192,262

15-59

33,570

123,003

-19,204

137,373

60+

-2,467

121,257

-619

118,167

South FSE

Males

0-14

245.826

88,635

44.744

379.311

15-59

4,594

435,276

81,154

521,062

60+

-3,197

286,337

10,754

293.901

Females

0-14

196,058

70,154

28.158

294,366

15-59

27,912

200,872

2,021

230.803

60+

-7,144

344,336

2,285

339,460

attributable to diarrheal diseases, followed by perinatal causes (11 percent), hepatitis (4 percent), and drowning (2 percent). The prominent role of hepatitis in this age group is highly unusual; further efforts are needed to confirm the coding and validity of this burden. Measles, diphtheria, pertussis, and tuberculosis are not large contributors to the excess mortality among children in this region, indicating the effectiveness of immunization programs in the region, at least up until 1990.



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