accelerated. The involvement of the astronaut corps in this effort is vital. More work is needed to develop escape protocols, evaluate the use of sensors to detect and localize penetrations, and develop procedures for making permanent repairs. If enhancements are to be made in orbit when the station is operational, then program managers must prepare for the enhancement now.

Recommendation 16. A study of the failure modes of shielded pressure walls should be performed over the critical range of the threat size, shape, and velocity to fully characterize damage control and repair requirements for potential International Space Station orbital debris penetration.

REFERENCES

Meteoroid/Debris FGB Design Team. 1996. NASA/Russia TIM #17 Protocol, Houston Texas, February 19–March 1, 1996. Briefing presented to the NRC Committee on International Space Station Meteoroid/Debris Risk Management, Houston, Texas, April 3, 1996.

Remaklus, D. 1996. Crew Response to Depressurization. Briefing presented to the NRC Committee on International Space Station Meteoroid/Debris Risk Management, Houston, Texas, April 3, 1996.

Williamsen, J., and T. Guay. 1996. Quantifying and Enhancing Space Station Safety Following Orbital Debris Penetration. Briefing presented to the NRC Committee on International Space Station Meteoroid/Debris Risk Management, Houston, Texas, April 3, 1996.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement