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Appendix H Biographical Sketches of Molten Salt Pane! Members and Consultants John L. Margrave, Chair, is the E.D. Butcher Professor of Chemistry at Rice University. His professional interests lie in areas of physical-inorganic chemistry including matrix-isolation spectroscopy and metal atom chemistry; fluorine chemistry; high-temperature chemistry, including mass spectrometry; levitation calorimetry and fluorine bomb calorimetry; laser applications; chemical vapor deposition of thin films; and environmental chemistry. Dr. Margrave was a member of the founding board of directors of Houston Advanced Research Center, where he has also served as vice president for research, director of the Materials Science Research Center, and currently serves as chief scientific officer. He has edited the journal High Temperature and Materials Science since its founding and has received numerous professional awards. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Margrave has served on many National Research Council committees. He received his B.S. in engineering physics and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Kansas. Sol Burstein is a registered professional engineer and currently does consulting work mainly in the areas of nuclear and mechanical engineering management. He retired as vice chairman of the board of directors of Wisconsin Energy Corporation and spent 21 years of his career with Wisconsin Electric Power Company. Dr. Burstein is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including distinguished service awards from the University of Wisconsin, Marquette University, and the Engineering and Scientific Societies of Milwaukee. He has served on numerous industry and government advisory committees, including the Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, several committees of the National Research Council, and its Board on H.1

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H.2 AN EVALUATION OF DOE ALTERNATIVES FOR MERE Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Burstein is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.S.M.E. from Northeastern University and an honorary D.Sc. from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. Robert Catlin is a licensed medical physicist and certified health physicist. He retired in 1995 as executive director, clinical and laboratory safety, at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, where he also served as executive director of the Positron Diagnostic and Research Center and taught radiological science at the School of Public Health. Previously, he served as scientific adviser for the Electric Power Research Institute and had careers in federal service and industry. Mr. Catlin is a member of Sigma Xi, the American Academy of Health Physics, and other professional societies. He has participated as a consultant to the former Soviet Union and to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on radiological matters for incidents at Chernobyl and at Chelyabinsk. He has served on numerous industry and government advisory committees, including those of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Mr. Catlin received his A.B. degree in biology from Princeton University and an M.S. equivalent in health physics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Gregory R. Choppin is the R. O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. Dr. Choppin's research includes nuclear chemistry, physical chemistry of the actinides and lanthanides, environmental behavior of actinides, chemistry of the f- Elements, separation science of the f-Elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. During a postdoctoral period at the Lawrence Radiation [Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. His research activities have been recognized by the American Chemical Society's Award in Nuclear Chemistry and Southern Chemist Award, the Manufacturing Chemists award in Chemical Education, and a Presidential Citation Award of the American Nuclear Society. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees and currently is a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology and the Board on Radioactive Waste Management's Committee on Remediation of Buried

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APPENDIXH BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES H.3 and Tank Wastes. He received his B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, New OrIeans, his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Texas, Austin; an honorary degree from Chalmers University, Goteborg, Sweden; and an honorary D.Sc. from Loyola University. Melvin S. Coops is currently a part-time staff member with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a consultant with Los Alamos National Laboratory and, through the University of Chicago, is a technical reviewer of the Nuclear Technology Program at Argonne National Laboratory. Mr. Coops's experience in chemical separations of radioactive materials, actinide metallurgy, and remotely operates} processing systems spans more than 40 years. He is an expert in nuclear fuel cycle chemistry using both aqueous methods and pyrochemical techniques. His experience includes separations chemistry of the fission product and lanthanide and actinide elements, with a special interest in the chemistry, metallurgy, and nuclear properties of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Mr. Coops is retired from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory but continues to work there part-time. He has been a member of the American Nuclear Society since its inception. He holds a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and an Sc.D. equivalent from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Floyd L. Culler, Jr., is president emeritus of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). He is recognized for his knowledge and leadership in all types of energy research and development, analysis, and related environmental impact assessment. Prior to his service with EPRI, he was deputy director at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Mr. Culler spent 30 years at ORNE in nuclear energy, chemical reprocessing, reactor research, fuel cycles, and radioactive waste management. He has received many honors, including the International Atoms for Peace Award and the E.O. Lawrence Memorial Award. He is a member of the American Nuclear Society, the American Institute of Chemists, and the National Academy of Engineering, and he served on the Scientific Advisory Committee to the International Atomic Energy Agency. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.

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H.4 ANEVAL US TION OF DOE ALTERNA TINES FOR MSRE Albert W. Jache is professor emeritus of chemistry at Marquette University, where he has served as dean of the Graduate School, associate vice president for Health Sciences, and associate vice president for Academic Affairs. His research interests lie primarily in the area of inorganic chemistry, with emphasis on fluorine and its compounds. The concept of anhydrous water-like systems as solvents and reaction media has had special attention. Dr. Jache has served in various posts, including scientist in residence at Argonne National Laboratory. He has also had considerable industrial research experience. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemists. He received his B.S. and M.S. in chemistry from the University of New Hampshire and his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Washington. Ronald A. Knief is a principal consultant with Ogden Environmental and Energy Services in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Dr. Knief, formerly with the University of New Mexico and GPU Nuclear Corporation, has primary interests that include nuclear safety, risk management, and performance-based education and training. At Ogden he has served on nuclear safety oversight committees and has been involved in safety analysis and training projects for a number of commercial and DOE complex facilities. Dr. Knief is the author of textbooks on nuclear engineering and nuclear criticality safety and is editor of two books on risk management. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), recipient of the ANS Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Achievement Award, an active participant in the development of American National Standards Tnstitute's ANSI-ANS-8-series standards for nuclear criticality safety, and a member of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. He received his B.A. in physics, mathematics, and economics from Albion College and his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of TIlinois at Urbana- Champaign. Milton Levenson has done consulting work in chemical engineering with an emphasis on reactor safety, water reactor technology, fuel cycle technology, and breeder reactor development since his retirement as vice president of Bechte] International. He has also served

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APPENDIXH BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES H.5 as director of nuclear power for the Electric Power Research Institute. He received the Robert E. Wilson Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Mr. Levenson is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Nuclear Society and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.Ch.E. from the University of Minnesota. Robert A. Penneman is currently a consultant with Los Alamos National Laboratory and was a scientist at that facility for most of his professional career. Dr. Penneman's research interests include general chemistry, actinides, americium-curium, fluorine, infrared and structural chemistry, radiochemistry-radiation effects, radioactive nuclide handling, and waste storage. His numerous publications include an encyclopedia and chapters in Katz and Seaborg's (1986) The Chemistry of the Actinide Elements. He is a founding member and editor of Inorganic Chemistry, and an editor of the Journal of Inorganic ant! Nuclear Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry [esters. He has received the Seaborg Award for Actinide Separations Chemistry. Dr. Penneman is a member of the American Chemical Society, as well as many other professional societies. He received an A.B. from Millikin University, an M.S. in chemistry from the University of Illinois, a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Illinois, and an honorary Sc.D. from Millikin University. Robert A. Rapp is distinguished university professor emeritus of materials science and engineering at Ohio State University. Dr. Rapp's professional interests include oxidation of metals and alloys, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical metallurgy, and physical metallurgical engineering. In the past, he has served as a Fulbright fellow of the Max Planck Institute of Physical Chemistry and as a Guggenheim fellow at the University of Grenoble. Dr. Rapp's awards include the Howe Gold Medal of the American Society of Metals, the Willis R Whitney Award of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, and the U.H. Evans Award of the British Institute of Corrosion. He is a fellow of the Electrochemical Society; ASM International; the National Association of Corrosion Engineers; and the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers. He received his B.S. from Purdue University and both his M.S. and his Ph.D. in metallurgical

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H.6 AN EVALUATION OF DOE ALTERNATIVES FOR MSRE engineering from the Carnegie Institute of Technology, as well as an honorary Ph.D. from the Polytechnical Institute of Toulouse. Edwin L. Zebroski is director of risk management services at Aptech Engineering Services, Inc., in Sunnyvale, California, and also provides consulting services on risk analysis and decision analysis through EIgis Consulting Company. He has extensive experience in the design, development, safety, materials, and fuel cycle aspects of light- water reactors and sodium-cooled fast reactors. He has authored many technical publications, including patents and sections of six books. Previous positions include manager of development engineering, General Electric Company's nuclear division; director of systems and materials department and chief nuclear scientist at the Electric Power Research Institute; and vice president of engineering at the Institute for Nuclear Power Operation. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Physical Society, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Nuclear Society. He received his B.S. in science from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California. CONSULTANTS Valerie L. Putman, Consultant, is senior engineer, criticality safety, for Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company. Her experience and interests lie in nuclear criticality safety and in accident and incident investigation. Ms. Putman is a member of the American Nuclear Society; its Nuclear Criticality Safety, Human Factors, and Environment divisions; and its Professional Development Coordinating Committee. She is also active in several American Nuclear Society ANS- ~ standards writing groups on criticality safety. Ms. Putman received her B.S. in both applied physics and mathematics from the University of Utah and her M.E. in mechanical engineering with nuclear emphasis from the University of Idaho. She is pursuing her Ph.D. in nuclear engineering through a joint program with Idaho State University and the University of Idaho.

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APPENDIX H BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES H.7 Thomas A. Reilly, Consultant, is a technical adviser at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Mr. Reilly has 25 years of experience in the recovery of plutonium and uranium as implemented at the separation plants at the Savannah River site. He is an expert in criticality safety of various separation unit operations including dissolution, ion exchange, evaporation, precipitation, and solvent extraction. He has served as the criticality safety lead for assessments at Oak Ridge and Rocky Flats and as a member of the Kaiser-Hill Nuclear Criticality Safety Confirmation Team for the Rocky Flats Criticality Safety Manual. Mr. Reilly is a member of the American Nuclear Society Criticality Safety Division Program Committee and Criticality Safety Standards Subcommittee ANS-~. He has a B.Ch.E. from Lehigh University and an M.Ch.E. from the University of Delaware.

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