REFERENCES

Adams, R. M., B. A. McCarl, K. Bryant, A. Solow, D. Legler, J. O'Brien, and R. Weiher 1995. Value of improved long-range weather information. Contemporary Economic Policy 13:10-19.


Cambella, A. D., and E. Todd 1993. Seafood toxins of algal origin and their control in Canada. Pp. 129-144 in I.R. Falconer (ed.), Algal Toxins in Seafood and Drinking Water. Academic Press, London.

Colwell, R. R. 1991. Non-cultivatible Vibrio cholerae 01 in environmental waters, zooplankton and edible crustacea; implications for understanding the epidemiological behavior of cholera. Presentation to the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, December, Boston, Mass.

CENR (Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources), Task Force on Observations and Data Management. 1996. Concept for an Integrated Global Observing Strategy. Office of Science, Technology, and Policy, Washington, D.C.


Department of Commerce. 1990. Fifty Years of Population Change Along the Nation's Coasts, 1960-2010. National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, D.C.


Epstein, P. R. 1993. Algal Blooms in the Spread and Persistence of Cholera, vol. 31, Pp. 209-221. Elsevier Scientific Publishers Ireland Ltd., Ireland.


Hilborn, R., and C. J. Walters. 1993. Quantitative Fisheries Stock Assessment: Choice Dynamics and Uncertainty. Routledge, Chapman & Hall, New York.


Institute for Property Loss Reduction and Insurance Research Council. 1995. Coastal Exposure and Community Protection: Hurricane Andrew's Legacy.

IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission). 1994. Global Ocean Observing System: Status Report on Existing Elements and Related Systems. Report IOC/INF-992, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO, Paris.



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The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities REFERENCES Adams, R. M., B. A. McCarl, K. Bryant, A. Solow, D. Legler, J. O'Brien, and R. Weiher 1995. Value of improved long-range weather information. Contemporary Economic Policy 13:10-19. Cambella, A. D., and E. Todd 1993. Seafood toxins of algal origin and their control in Canada. Pp. 129-144 in I.R. Falconer (ed.), Algal Toxins in Seafood and Drinking Water. Academic Press, London. Colwell, R. R. 1991. Non-cultivatible Vibrio cholerae 01 in environmental waters, zooplankton and edible crustacea; implications for understanding the epidemiological behavior of cholera. Presentation to the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, December, Boston, Mass. CENR (Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources), Task Force on Observations and Data Management. 1996. Concept for an Integrated Global Observing Strategy. Office of Science, Technology, and Policy, Washington, D.C. Department of Commerce. 1990. Fifty Years of Population Change Along the Nation's Coasts, 1960-2010. National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, D.C. Epstein, P. R. 1993. Algal Blooms in the Spread and Persistence of Cholera, vol. 31, Pp. 209-221. Elsevier Scientific Publishers Ireland Ltd., Ireland. Hilborn, R., and C. J. Walters. 1993. Quantitative Fisheries Stock Assessment: Choice Dynamics and Uncertainty. Routledge, Chapman & Hall, New York. Institute for Property Loss Reduction and Insurance Research Council. 1995. Coastal Exposure and Community Protection: Hurricane Andrew's Legacy. IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission). 1994. Global Ocean Observing System: Status Report on Existing Elements and Related Systems. Report IOC/INF-992, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO, Paris.

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The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission). 1995. Second Session Strategy Sub-Committee (SSC) of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Intergovernmental Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System (I-GOOS), Paris, 6-9 June 1995. Report I-GOOS/SSC-11/3, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO, Paris. IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission). 1996a. Towards Operational Oceanography: The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). Report IOC/INF-1028, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO, Paris. IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission) 1996b. Joint Scientific and Technical Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System: Third Session, Paris, France, 23-25 April 1996. Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Report SC-96/WS/30, UNESCO, Paris. IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission). 1996c. A Strategic Plan for the Assessment and Prediction of the Health of the Ocean: A Module of the Global Ocean Observing System. Report IOC/INF-1044, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO, Paris. Kite-Powell, H., D. Jin, and S. Farrow. 1994. Quantitative Estimation of Benefits and Costs of a Proposed Coastal Forecast System. Report to NOAA's National Ocean Service, Woods Hole, Mass. Lewis, C., and K. Murdock. In press. The role of government contracts in distributing reinsurance markets for natural disasters. Journal of Risk and Insurance. NRC (National Research Council ). 1994a. Facing the Challenge: The U.S. Report to the IDNDR World Conference on Natural Disaster Reduction, Yokohama, Japan. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. NRC (National Research Council). 1994b. Review of U.S. Planning for the Global Ocean Observing System. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. Nowlin, W. D., Jr., N. Smith, G. Needler, P.K. Taylor, R. Weller, R. Schmitt, L. Merlivat, A. Vezina, A. Alexiou, M. McPhaden, and M. Wakatsuchi. 1996: An ocean observing system for climate. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 77:2243-2273.

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The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities OOSDP (Ocean Observing System Development Panel). 1995. Scientific Design for the Common Module of the Global Climate Observing System and the Global Ocean Observing System: An Ocean Observing System for Climate. Report by the Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station. Sassone, P. 1997. Cost-Benefit Analysis of TOGA and the ENSO Observing System. Report to NOAA by the Economics Group, Atlanta, Ga. Smith, N. R., G. T. Needler. and the Ocean Observing System Development Panel. 1995. An ocean observing system for climate: the conceptual design. Climate Change, 31:475-494 Traynor, J. J. and N. J. Williams. 1983. Target strength measurements of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) and a simulation study of the dual beam method. FAO Fisheries Report, 300:112-124. Traynor, J. J., W. A. Karp, M. Furusawa, T. Sasaki, K. Teshima, T. M. Sample, N.J. Williamson, and T. Yoshimura. 1990. Methodology and biological results from surveys of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma ) in the eastern Bering Sea and Aleutian Basin in 1988 Pp. 69-99 in L. L. Low (ed.), Proceedings of the Symposium on Application of Stock Assessment Techniques to Gadids. International North Pacific Fisheries Commission, Bull. No. 50. UNCED (United Nations Conference on Environment and Development). 1992. Agenda 21, Chapter 17: Protection of the Oceans, All Kinds of Seas Including Enclosed and Semi-Enclosed Seas, and Coastal Areas and the Protection, Rational Use and Development of Their Living Resources . Paragraph 17:101-111. U.S. GOOS Interagency Project Office. 1995. U.S. National Report: 1994 Activities Contributing to a Global Ocean Observing System. U.S. GOOS Interagency Program Office. Silver Spring, Md. U.S. GOOS Interagency Project Office. 1996. U.S. National Report: 1995 Activities Contributing to a Global Ocean Observing System. U.S. GOOS Interagency Program Office. Silver Spring, Md. U.S. IWG (U.S. Interagency ad hoc Working Group for GOOS). 1993. Activities Contributing to a Global Ocean Observing System. 1993 National

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The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities Report. National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, D.C.

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The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities This page in the original is blank.