Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

GEORGE M. HORNBERGER obtained his Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University in 1970. He also holds bachelor's (1965) and master's (1967) degrees in civil engineering from Drexel University. As Ernest H. Ern Professor of Environmental Science at the University of Virginia, he is currently interested in modeling environmental systems with uncertainty, the hydrogeochemical response of small catchments, and transport of bacteria in porous media. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and recently was appointed to chair the National Research Council's Commission of Geosciences, Environment, and Resources.

LISA ALVAREZ-COHEN is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her Ph.D. in environmental engineering and sciences from Stanford University. Dr. Alvarez-Cohen's research interests include experimental research and modeling of microbial processes in porous media, bioremediation of contaminated aquifers, innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies, and application of cometabolic biotransformation reactions.

KENNETH R. BRADBURY is a research hydrogeologist/professor with the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, University of Wisconsin-Extension, in Madison. He received his Ph.D. in hydrogeology in 1982 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, his A.M. in geology in 1977 from Indiana University, and his B.A. in geology in 1974 from Ohio Wesleyan University. His current research interests include ground water flow in fractured media, ground water recharge processes, wellhead protection, and the hydrogeology of glacial deposits.

KIMBERLY A. GRAY is an associate professor of environmental engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering at Northwestern University. She



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Watershed Research in the U.S. Geological Survey Biographical Sketches of Committee Members GEORGE M. HORNBERGER obtained his Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University in 1970. He also holds bachelor's (1965) and master's (1967) degrees in civil engineering from Drexel University. As Ernest H. Ern Professor of Environmental Science at the University of Virginia, he is currently interested in modeling environmental systems with uncertainty, the hydrogeochemical response of small catchments, and transport of bacteria in porous media. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and recently was appointed to chair the National Research Council's Commission of Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. LISA ALVAREZ-COHEN is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her Ph.D. in environmental engineering and sciences from Stanford University. Dr. Alvarez-Cohen's research interests include experimental research and modeling of microbial processes in porous media, bioremediation of contaminated aquifers, innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies, and application of cometabolic biotransformation reactions. KENNETH R. BRADBURY is a research hydrogeologist/professor with the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, University of Wisconsin-Extension, in Madison. He received his Ph.D. in hydrogeology in 1982 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, his A.M. in geology in 1977 from Indiana University, and his B.A. in geology in 1974 from Ohio Wesleyan University. His current research interests include ground water flow in fractured media, ground water recharge processes, wellhead protection, and the hydrogeology of glacial deposits. KIMBERLY A. GRAY is an associate professor of environmental engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering at Northwestern University. She

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Watershed Research in the U.S. Geological Survey received her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins in 1988, an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Miami in 1983, and a B.A. in biology in 1978 from Northwestern University. Dr. Gray teaches physicochemical processes, aquatic chemistry, environmental analytical chemistry, and drinking water treatment design. Her research entails experimental study of both engineered and natural processes. She also studies the characteristics of natural organic matter in surface waters, wetlands, and treatment systems by pyrolysis-GC-MS. Other topics of research include the use of semiconductors to photocatalyze the destruction of hazardous chemicals, application of ionizing radiation to reductively dechlorinate pollutants in soil matrices, and ecotoxicology of polychlorinated biphenyls in periphytic biolayers. C. THOMAS HAAN is the regents professor and Sarkeys Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Oklahoma State University. He received his Ph.D. in agricultural engineering from Iowa State University in 1967. Dr. Haan's research interests are hydrology, hydrologic and water quality modeling, stochastic hydrology, risk analysis, and geographic information systems. Dr. Haan is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. CONSTANCE HUNT received her B.S. in wildlife biology from Arizona State University and her M.A. in public policy from the University of Chicago. She is a senior program officer with the World Wildlife Fund, where she directs the freshwater ecosystem conservation program, including projects to promote restoration of the upper Mississippi River basin, coordination with South Florida restoration efforts, involvement in national water resources policy, and international river conservation efforts. Previously, she conducted interagency coordinator projects, wetland evaluations and delineations, permit processing, and environmental impact analysis while on the staff of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. DAWN S. KABACK is a hydrogeochemist who received her Ph.D. in geological sciences from the University of Colorado in 1977. Presently, she is president of the Colorado Center for Environmental Management in Denver. Previously, Dr. Kaback managed the ground water research group (Environmental Sciences Section) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina. Her work involves aquifer characterization and development of innovative technologies to improve environmental restoration of contaminated soils and ground water. Previously, she worked for Conoco in the R&D department where she had

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Watershed Research in the U.S. Geological Survey a variety of assignments related to environmental effects of mining, geochemical exploration, and clastic diagenesis as applied to petroleum exploration. DAVID H. MOREAU is a professor in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Moreau received his B.Sc. in civil engineering in 1960 from Mississippi State University, an M.Sc. in civil engineering in 1963 from North Carolina State University, an M.Sc. in engineering in 1964 from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in water resources in 1967 from Harvard University. Dr. Moreau has been a consultant to United Nations Development Program, Water Management Models for Water Supply; New York City, review of water demand projections; and Water for Sanitation and Health Program (Agency for International Development), financing of water supply and waste disposal. CYNTHIA L. PAULSON is manager of watershed services for Brown and Caldwell, a consulting environmental engineering firm, in Denver, Colorado. She received a B.A. in political and environmental science from Whitman College, an M.S. in environmental engineering from Colorado State University in 1978, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering in 1993 from the University of Colorado. Dr. Paulson's work has focused on watershed and water quality planning and assessment, including evaluations of impacts on the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of surface waters and appropriate mitigation programs. FREDERICK G. POHLAND is professor and Edward R. Weidlein Chair of Environmental Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. He received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Purdue University in 1961. Dr. Pohland's research interests include environmental engineering operations and processes, water and waste chemistry and microbiology, solid and hazardous waste management, and environmental impact monitoring assessment and remediation. Dr. Pohland is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. LEONARD SHABMAN received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics in 1972 from Cornell University. He is a professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and is director of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. Dr. Shabman has conducted economic research over a wide range of topics in natural resource and environmental policy, with emphasis in six general areas: coastal resources management; planning, investment, and financing of

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Watershed Research in the U.S. Geological Survey water resource development; flood hazard management; federal and state water planning; water quality management; and fisheries management. MITCHELL J. SMALL is a professor at Carnegie Mellon University in the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Dr. Small has interests in mathematical modeling of environmental quality, statistical methods and uncertainty analysis, human risk perception and decisionmaking. DAVID A. WOOLHISER received his Ph.D civil engineering, with minors in meteorology and geophysics, from the University of Wisconsin in 1962. Dr. Woolhiser retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service in 1991 after a 30-year career and is currently a faculty affiliate in civil engineering at Colorado State University and a hydrologist in Fort Collins, Colorado. He is known for his work on the hydrology and hydrometerology of arid and semiarid rangelands, simulation of hydrologic systems, numerical modeling of surface runoff, erosion and chemical transport, and probabilistic models of rainfall and runoff. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.