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136 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS The electron. In: Encyclopaedia Britannica,.Vol. 8, pp. 323-27. Chicago, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. 1948 Lattice vibrations and specific heat of diamond. Naturforschung, 3a:607-11. Normal vibrations of a crystal lattice. 20: 161-65. 1949 Zeitschrift fur Reviews of Modern Physics, With C. F. Squire. Electromagnetic induction in a superconductor. Phys. Rev., 76:685-86. (L) 1950 Electric and magnetic forces on superconductors. Soc., 94:453-58. With N. Muench. Electromagnetic forces on a superconductor. Phys. Rev., 79:967-70. Physics for adventure. Phys. Today, 3 (6) :20-21. Proc. Am. Phil. 1951 On the spirit of physics. Phys. Today, 4 (2) :g-10. Principles of Quantum Mechanics. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc. vii + 288 pp. 1952 Description of the physical world. In: The Scientist Looks at His World, pp. 5-32. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press. With R. H. Pry and A. L. Lathrop. Gyromagnetic effect in a superconductor. Phys. Rev., 86: 905-7. Phys. Rev., 88: Temperature dependence of electrical resistance. 1321-23. Theory and practice in engineering. Phys. Today, 5 (9) :4-5. 1954 Robert Andrews Millikan. In: The American Philosophical So- ciety Year Book, pp. 440-44. Philadelphia, The American Philo- sophical Society.

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WILLIAM VERMILLION HOUSTON 137 1955 Philosophy in the twentieth century. Proceedings of the Philo- sophical Society of Texas, 20: 7-15. With H. E. Rorschach. Motion of nuclei in liquid helium. Phys. Rev., 100: 1003-7. Physics in engineering. Am. J. Phys., 23:610-14. 1956 Objectives of engineering education. nology, 8: 12-14, January. Journal of Petroleum Tech- 1960 Waves and Particles. Columbus, Ohio State University Press. 18 pp. (First Annual Alpheus W. Smith Lecture.) Electrons and nuclei in ideal crystals. In: Modern Physics for the Engineer, by L. N. Ridenour and W. A. Nierenberg, pp. 83-107. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc. 1963 Some observations on the theory of electrons and atomic nuclei in solids. Phys. Today, 16:26-36. 1966 With D. R. Smith. Mechanical forces on a superconducting film. Physical Review Letters, 16:B552 1-2 and 2-2. Are electrons real? Am. J. Phys., 34:351-57. Particles and fields in physics. The Physics Teacher, 4:158-60. 1967 With D. R. Smith. Motion of magnetic flux in superconducting strips. Phys. Rev., 163:431-34.

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS November 8, ~ 887- March 7, 1954 BY WILLIAM C. ROSE AND MINOR J. COON HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS died in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on March 7, 1954, after a prolonged illness. Thus ended the career of a dedicated and talented teacher, and a sound and skillful investigator. For thirty-two years he had served the University of Michigan with distinction as head of the Depart- ment of Biological Chemistry in the School of Medicine. In 1947, the University, in appreciation of his remarkable services and national reputation, conferred upon him a distinguished professorship entitled the John Jacob Abel University Professor- ship in Biological Chemistry. In addition to his departmental duties, Lewis was director of the College of Pharmacy from 1933 to 1947. Lewis was born on a farm near Southington, Connecticut, on November 8, 1887, the son of Frederick A. and Charlotte R. (Parmelee) Lewis. Little information is available concerning his early life; he left no record of his boyhood, nor of the influences that motivated him in pursuing a scientific career. However, his scholarly temperament was revealed even before he entered college. Prior to his sixteenth birthday, he graduated from high school as valedictorian of his class. He had a special interest in the classics. During the year of waiting to meet the age require- ment for admission to Yale, he mastered, by self-instruction, a two-year course in high school Greek. At Yale, he won the 139

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140 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS Chamberlain Prize for the best entrance examination in the Greek language. Lewis entered the freshman class of Yale College in 1904 and was awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree four years later. The record shows that his devotion to Greek and Latin per- sisted, though he graduated "with honors in physical sciences." He stood fourth in a class of three hundred and eighty. During his college years he was the recipient of prizes in Latin composi- tion, chemistry, and calculus. Most of the two years immediately following his graduation (1908-1910) was occupied in teaching at Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia, and at the Centenary Collegiate Institute, Hackettstown, New Jersey. During half of the second year, he began graduate study in chemistry at George Washington University. Apparently, Dr. Isaac K. Phelps, onetime member of the chemistry faculty at this institution, played an important role in encouraging Lewis to pursue his training in biochem- istry. He, like Lewis, was a Yale graduate and a native son of Connecticut, and seems to have regarded biochemistry, a rela- tively new branch of chemistry at the time, as a particularly inviting field for a young scientist. Lewis entered the Graduate School of Yale University in the fall of 1910. His program of training was directed by Pro- fessor Lafayette B. Mendel, a man of remarkable charm, peda- gogic skill, and research acumen. During his last two years at Yale, Lewis served as Professor Mendel's laboratory assistant. He was awarded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1913. During much of his college career Lewis found it necessary to finance his training by tutoring and other extracurricular activities. During one summer, Professor Mendel obtained em- ployment for him in the laboratories of the Connecticut State Hospital at Middletown. This was not an unusual experience for financially needy students in Mendel's laboratory. Several in turn were privileged to engage in such employment. The

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 141 position paid a small stipend in addition to room and board. More importantly, it afforded an opportunity for the student to acquire valuable experience in clinical laboratory techniques, while leaving sufficient time for him to exercise his originality in the pursuit of an independent research project. Lewis used the occasion to study the nature of the antigen in the Wasserman reaction. Following the completion of his training for the doctorate, Lewis accepted an instructorship in physiological chemistry in the School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. He held this position for two years (1913-1915~. Sometime during the latter year, he was invited to assume responsibility for the teaching and research programs of the Division of Physiological Chemistry ~ in the Chemistry Department of the University of Illinois. He accepted this challenge and began his new duties on the Urbana campus in the fall of 1915. There, single- handedly, except for the modicum of help received from a part- time student assistant, he organized and taught a general course in physiological chemistry and three graduate courses dealing with special topics. In addition, he attracted a number of stu- dents to work toward advanced degrees under his direction. Between the Pennsylvania and Illinois assignments, Lewis married Mildred Lois Eaton, daughter of the late Dr. Edward Dwight Eaton, President of Beloit College from 1886 to 1917. She passed away in 1961. Two daughters, Charlotte Barber and Elizabeth Parmelee, survive. Lewis remained at the University of Illinois until 1922, when he was called to head the Department of Physiological Chemistry ~ at the University of Michigan. There he continued to display his genius as a teacher, as an investigator, and as an administrator. But his influence did not stop at the borders of the campus. His wide knowledge of medical sciences and The name alas later changed to the Division of Biochemistry. The name was later changed to the Department of Biological Chemistry.

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142 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS medical education led many outside organizations to seek his services. For fifteen years he was a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners, a position which required an in- credible amount of arduous labor. From 1936 until his final illness he was a member of the Council on Foods and Nutrition of the American Medical Association. From 1945 to 1948, he was a member of the Division of Medical Sciences of the Na- tional Research Council, and for five years he was chairman of the Michigan Nutrition Council. As for organizations more closely associated with his specialty, Lewis was intimately involved in the activities of the American Institute of Nutrition as a councilor ~ 1 94 1-1 942), vice presi- dent ~ 1 942-1 943), and president ~ 1 943-1 944) . During the long period in which the American Society of Biological Chemists had no paid officials, Lewis, with rare skill and efficiency, per- formed the laborious task of being its secretary (1929-1933~. Subsequently, he was elected to the offices of vice president 1933-1935), president ~ 1935-1937), and councilor ~ 1937- 1940 and 1941-1942) of the Society. One of his greatest con- tributions to science was the dedicated manner in which, for many years, he managed the Placement Service of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. With a min- imal allowance for secretarial help, he brought together many young scientists seeking employment and institutions seeking personnel. Partly because of these services, and partly because of his love of people, Howard Lewis probably knew personally more biochemists and related scientists than any other indi- vidual in this country. At various times in his busy career, Lewis was a member of the editorial boards of five periodicals, namely, the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the Journal of Nutrition, Chemical Re- views, Physiological Reviews, and the Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. On several occasions he was honored by being chosen to deliver special lectures. In

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 143 1932, he was the Beaumont Lecturer of the Wayne County Medical Society; in 1941, he was Lecturer of the Harvey Society of New York; and in 1948, he was the Henry Russel Lecturer of the Research Club of the University of Michigan. Membership in professional societies, other than those al- ready mentioned, included the American Chemical Society, the American Physiological Society, the American Pharmaceutical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (fellow), the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, and the American Medical Association (associate). In 1949 he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences. A review of Lewis's many outside activities leads one to wonder how he could have accomplished so much while suc- cessfully carrying the full-time responsibilities of a large and active department. Despite his many professional duties, Lewis always seemed to find time for healthful recreation. He loved the o~t of It TATL_.L___ ]_ _ ~ . . vvt~er nits moon at the moment called for a game of tennis or a long walk in the country, he pursued the pastime with zeal and alacrity. One of his favorite hobbies was gardening. He seemed to take special delight in seeing plants grow. Perhaps this was an echo of earlier experiences as a boy on a Connecticut farm. He was an expert bridge player; and not the least im- portant of his hobbies was his lifelong interest in philately. His knowledge of stamps is said to have amazed all who heard him talk about them. He lectured frequently to interested groups on such topics as "Pioneers in Philately"; "The Literature , Aid Ally r clllly DlaCK'; and "Some Early Charity Stamps." Sometimes the lectures were illustrated with Blues. En one occasion he spoke on "Philately and Medicine" before the Detroit Academy of Surgeons. The next day, one of the physicians in the audience, who also was a Regent of the University, wrote in part as follows: "Your talk last night was a masterpiece.... I was actually thrilled.... It was an extremely of Phil~t-=l~r,,. ELI ~~ _ Hi_ ~' ~ ~ ~1:~1 ~~ ~ ~ ^.~ ~~ was a .. ,

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144 BIOGRAPHICAL ME M OIRS interesting evening . . . such a refreshing, and altogether unusual evening." Howard's knowledge and appreciation of music continued As a young instructor in Philadelphia, he enjoyed the symphonies, the operas, and the other musical entertainments afforded by the city. One of his associates of that period describes this quality of Howard's character as follows: and grew throughout his career. "These were the years when grand opera was being first brought to Philadelphia. Our chief, Alonzo E. Taylor, as well as the rest of the laboratory family, were all enthusiastic dev- oteesHoward in particular. Assembling in the laboratory a morning after an evening of opera we were plunged immedi- ately into a vigorous discussion of the opera in some detail. Howard had an amazing memory of all the plots and in particu- lar of the musical themes in each. I relished these occasions, for my previous laboratory contacts had suggested that art and chemistry should not be too intimately mixed." ~ Later, music became a common interest of the Lewis family. Each member, except Howard, acquired a proficiency in the use of one or more instruments. Thus a trio could be assembled and a delightful concert rendered at a moment's notice. Many happy hours were spent in this way, to the edification, not only of the instrumentalists themselves, but of their many friends who were privileged to hear the concerts. Perhaps the secret of Howard Lewis's success in so many areas of human endeavor is to be found, not only in his inherent native ability, but also in the spirit which he displayed in the performance of every undertaking. Whether work or play was the object to which he was about to devote his seemingly in- exhaustible store of energy, he approached it with enthusiasm and zest, as though its doing was a new adventure never before experienced. He gave his very best to every enterprise. Not only was he a hard worker; he was a hard player as well. ~ From a letter to Mrs. Lewis from the late Dr. Wm. H. Adolph.

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS BIBLIOGRAPHY KEY TO ABBREVIA TIONS 159 Am. J. Pharm. Educ. _ American journal of Pharmaceutical Education Am. J. Physiol. American Journal of Physiology Ann. Internal Med. Annals of Internal Medicine Ann. Rev. Biochem. Annual Review of Biochemistry Cyclo. Med., Surg., Specialties Cyclopedia of Medicine, Surgery, and Specialties i. Am. Chem. Soc. Journal of the American Chemical Society I. Am. Dietetic Assoc. Journal of the American Dietetic Association i. Am. Med. Assoc. Journal of the American Medical Association J. Biol. Chem.Journal of Biological Chemistry I. Rich. State Med. Soc. journal of the Michigan State Medical Society I. Nutrition- Journal of Nutrition I. Pharmacol. Exp. Therap. journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Oral Surg., Oral Med., Oral Pathol. - Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. - Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 1912 The behavior of some hydantoin derivatives in metabolism. I. Hy- dantoin and ethyl hydantoate. l. Biol. Chem., 13:347-56. The value of inulin as a foodstuff. i. Am. Med. Assoc., 58:1176-77. 1913 The behavior of some hydantoin derivatives in metabolism. II. 2- Thiohydantoins. l. Biol. Chem., 14:245-56. With B. H. Nicolet. The reaction of some purine, pyrimidine, and hydantoin derivatives with the uric acid and phenol reagents of Folin and Denis. J. Biol. Chem., 16:369-73. 1914 With E. NI. Frankel. The influence of inulin on the output of glucose in phlorhizin diabetes. J. Biol. Chem., 17:365-67. Studies on the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. I. The synthesis of hippuric acid in rabbits on a glycocoll-free diet. I. Biol. Chem., 17:503-8. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. II. The synthesis and rate of elimination of hippuric acid after benzoate ingestion in man. I. Biol. Chem., 18: 225-31.

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160 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS 1915 With A. E. Taylor. A study of the protein metabolism under con- ditions of repeated hemorrhage. I. Biol. Chem., 22:71-75. With A. E. Taylor. On the predominance of the liver in the forma- tion of urea. l. Biol. Chem., 22:77-80. The behavior of some hydantoin derivatives in metabolism. III. Parabanic acid. I. Biol. Chem., 23:281-86. 1916 With W. G. Karr. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. III. The excretion of uric acid in man after ingestion of sodium benzoate. I. Biol. Chem., 25:13-20. The metabolism of sulfur. I. The relative elimination of sulfur and nitrogen in the dog in inanition and subsequent feeding. I. Biol. Chem., 26:61-68. With W. G. Karr. A comparative study of the distribution of urea in the blood and tissues of certain vertebrates with especial reference to the hen. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 38: 1615-20. With W. G. Karr. Changes in the urea content of blood and tissues of guinea pigs maintained on an exclusive oat diet. J. Biol. Chem., 28: 17-25. (A . 1917 The metabolism of sulfur. II. The influence of small amounts of cystine on the balance of nitrogen in dogs maintained on a low protein diet. l. Biol. Chem., 31: 363-77. \Vith L. M. Smith. A study of the normal metabolism of the guinea pig. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 39:2231-39. Edith W. G. Karr. Tl~e phenol excretion of guinea pigs maintained Am. l. Physiol., 44:586-90. On an exclusive oat diet. 1918 With M. E. Newell. The occurrence of lichenase in the digestive tract of invertebrates. I. Biol. Chem., 33: 161-67. With E. A. Doisy. Studies in uric acid metabolism. I. The influ- ence of high protein diets on the endogenous uric acid elimina- tion. I. Biol. Chem., 36:1-7. With M. S. Dunn and E. A. Doisy. Studies in uric acid metabolism.

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 161 II. Proteins and amino acids as factors in the stimulation of endogenous uric acid metabolism. l. Biol. Chem., 36:9-26. Some analyses of the urine of reptiles. Science, 48:376. 1919 The antiscorbutic value of the banana. I. Biol. Chem., 40: 91-101. 1920 The metabolism of sulfur. III. The relation between the cystine content of proteins and their efficiency in the maintenance of nitrogenous equilibrium in dogs. J. Biol. Chem., 42:289-96. Title L. E. Root. Amino acid synthesis in the animal organism. Can norleucine replace lysine for the nutritive requirements of the white rat? I. Biol. Chem., 43:79-87. 1921 Studies on the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. IV. A note on the synthesis of hippuric acid in the rabbit after exclusion of bile from the intestine. I. Biol. Chem., 46:73-75. \Vith A. A. Christman. Lipase studies. I. The hydrolysis of the esters of some dicarboxylic acids by the lipase of the liver. Biol. Chem., 47 :495-505. With M. S. Dunn. The action of nitrous acid on casein. J. Biol. Chem., 49: 327~ 1. With M. S. Dunn. A comparative study of the hydrolysis of casein and deaminized casein by proteolytic enzymes. i. Biol. Chem., 49: 343-50. With G. Stearns. Diet and sex as factors in the creatinuria of man. Am. J. Physiol., 56: 60-71. 1922 With L. E. Root. The metabolism of sulfur. IV. The oxidation of cystine in the animal organism. l. Biol. Chem., 50:303-10. With D. A. McGinty. The metabolism of sulfur. V. Cysteine as an intermediary product in the metabolism of cystine. J. Biol. Chem., 53:349-56. With R. M. Hill. The hydrolysis of sucrose in the human stomach. Am. J. Physiol., 59:413-20.

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162 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS 1923 With R. C. Corley. Studies in uric acid metabolism. III. The influence of fats and carbohydrates on the endogenous uric acid elimination. i. Biol. Chem., 55:373-84. With E. C. Hyde. Lipase studies. II. A comparison of the hy- drolysis of the esters of the dicarboxylic acids by the lipase of the liver. l. Biol. Chem., 56: 7-15. With H. Updegraff. The reaction between proteins and nitrous acid. The tyrosine content of deaminized casein. I. Biol. Chem., 56:405-14. With W. H. Griffith. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. V. The influence of amino acids and related substances on the synthesis and rate of elimination of hippuric acid after the administration of benzoate. l. Biol. Chem., 57:1-24. With A. A. Christman. Biochemical studies on allantoin. I. The influence of amino acids on the excretion of allantoin by the rabbit. J. Biol. Chem., 57:379-95. With W. H. Griffith. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. VI. The influence of the protein of the diet on the synthesis and rate of elimination of hippuric acid after the administration of benzoate. I. Biol. Chem., 57:697- 707. 1924 With H. Updegraff and D. A. McGinty. The metabolism of sulfur. VI. The oxidation of cystine in the animal organism. Second paper. J. Biol. Chem., 59:59-71. With R. M. Hill. The metabolism of sulfur. VII. The oxidation of some sulfur compounds related to cystine in the animal organism. I. Biol. Chem., 59:557-67. \Vith R. M. Hill. The metabolism of sulfur. VIII. The behavior of thiophenol and thiocresol in the animal organism. I. Biol. Chem., 59:569-75. With H. Updegraff. A quantitative study of some organic con- stitutents of the saliva. l. Biol. Chem., 61:633-48. With D. A. McGinty and C. S. Marvel. Amino acid synthesis in the animal organism. The availability of some caproic acid de- rivatives for the synthesis of lysine. l. Biol. Chem., 62:75-92. Sulfur metabolism. Physiological Reviews, 4:394-423.

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 1925 163 The metabolism of sulfur. IX. The effect of repeated administra- tion of small amounts of cystine. J. Biol. Chem., 65:187-95. Some contributions of chemistry to the art and science of medicine. I. Erich. State ~led. Soc., 24:1-7. Insulin. Annals of Clinical Medicine, 3:623-33. 1926 With D. A. McGinty. Lipase studies. III. The hydrolysis of the esters of the dicarboxylic acids by the lipase of the liver. I. Biol. Chem., 67: 567-77. With R. H. Wilson. The metabolism of sulfur. X. The determina- tion of cystine in the urine. I. Biol. Chem., 69:125-31. With G. T. Lewis. The metabolism of sulfur. XI. Can taurine replace cystine in the diet of the young white rat? l. Ball. Chem., 69:589-98. With S. Izume. The influence of hydrazine and its derivatives on metabolism. I. The effect of substitution in the hydrazine mole- cule upon the hypoglycemic action of hydrazine. l. Pharmacol. Exp. Therap., 30:87-93. NVith S. Izume. The influence of hydrazine and its derivatives on metabolism. II. Changes in the non-protein nitrogenous con- stituents of the blood and in the metabolism of injected glycine in hydrazine intoxication. i. Biol. Chem., 71:33-49. With S. Izume. The influence of hydrazine and its derivatives on metabolism. III. The mechanism of hydrazine hypoglycemia. ]. Biol. Chem., 71:51-66. The role of the inorganic elements in nutrition. 68:950-58. 1927 Dental Cosmos, With G. T. Lewis. The metabolism of sulfur. XII. The value of diglycyl-cystine, dialanyl-cystine, and dialanyl-cystine dianhy- dride for the nutritive requirements of the white rat. i. Biol. Chem., 73:535-42. With R. H. Wilson. The cystine content of hair and other epi- dermal tissues. ]. Biol. Chem., 73:543-53. With G. T. Lewis. The metabolism of sulfur. XIII. The effect of elementary sulfur on the growth of the young white rat. I. Biol. Chem., 74:515-23.

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164 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS With M. G. Bodey and I. F. Huber. The absorption and utilization of inulin as evidenced by glycogen formation in the white rat. I. Biol. Chem., 75:715-23. \Vith F. H. Wiley. The distribution of nitrogen in the blood and urine of the turtle (Chrysemys pinta j. Am. J. Physiol., 81: 692-95. 1928 With S. L. Diack. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. VII. A comparison of the rate of elimination of hippuric acid after the ingestion of sodium benzoate, benzyl alcohol, and benzyl esters of succinic acid. {. Biol. Chem., 77:89-95. Occurrence of cystine in sweat of cystinurics. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 26: 69-70. With P. Hodgson. Physical development and the excretion of creatine and creatinine by women. Am. l. Physiol., 87:288-92. With hi. W. Johnston. Comparative studies of the metabolism of amino acids. I. Changes in the non-protein nitrogenous con- stituents of the blood following administration of amino acids. T. Biol. Chem., 78:67-82. 1929 With S. A. Lough. The metabolism of sulfur. XIV. A metabolic study of a case of cystinuria. I. Biol. Chem., 81:285-97. With H. D. Lightbody. The metabolism of sulfur. XV. The rela- tion of the protein and cystine content of the diet to the growth of the hair in the white rat. I. Biol. Chem., 82:485-97. Edith H. D. Lightbody. The metabolism of sulfur. XVI. Dietary factors in relation to the chemical composition of the hair of the young white rat. i. Biol. Chem., 82:663-71. NVith R. H. Wilson. Comparative studies of the metabolism of amino acids. II. The rate of absorption of amino acids from the gastrointestinal tract of the white rat. I. Biol. Chem., 84: 51 1-31. With L. F. Catron. The formation of glycogen in the liver of the young white rat after the oral administration of glycerol. J. Biol. Chem., 84:553-59. With R. L. Grant and A. A. Christman. Exogenous arginine as the

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 165 precursor of creatine in the dog. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 27:231-33. lg30 With R. H. Wilson. Comparative studies of the metabolism of amino acids. III. The formation of glycogen after oral adminis- tration of amino acids to white rats. I. Biol. Chem., 85:559-69. \Vith G. Stearns. The metabolism of sulfur. XVII. The rate of oxidation of ingested cystine in the organism of the rabbit. I. Biol. Chem., 86: 93-105. With F. H. Wiley. The action of nitrous acid on casein. II. T. Biol. Chem., 86:511-28. 1931 With M. F. O'Connor. Cystinuria and tuberculosis. American Review of Tuberculosis, 23: 134-38. With M. M. Miller. Glycogen formation in the white rat after oral administration of xylose. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 28:448-49. With N. F. Shambaugh and D. Tourtellotte. Comparative studies of the metabolism of the amino acids. IV. Phenylalanine and tyrosine. l. Biol. Chem., 92:499-511. 1932 \Vith S. A. Lough. The metabolism of sulfur. XVIII. The distri- bution of urinary sulfur in the rabbit after the administration of monobromobenzene. l. Biol. Chem., 94:739-47. With A. K. Silberman. The tyrosine content of cocoons of various species. I. Biol. Chem., 95:491-94. NAlith J. P. Chandler. Comparative studies of the metabolism of the amino acids. N1. The oxidation of phenylalanine and phenyl- pyruvic acid in the organism of the rabbit. l. Biol. Chem., 96:619-36. With M. M. Miller. Pentose metabolism. I. The rate of absorption of d-xylose and the formation of glycogen in the organism of the white rat after oral administration of d-xylose. I. Biol. Chem., 98: 133-40. NVith M. M. Miller. Pentose metabolism. II. The pentose content of the tissues of the white rat after the oral administration of d-xylose. I. Biol. Chem., 98:141-50. With A. White. The metabolism of sulfur. XIX. The distribution

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166 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS of urinary sulfur in the dog after the oral administration of monobromobenzene as influenced by the character of the dietary protein and by the feeding of ~-cystine and D~-methionine. I. Biol. Chem., 98:607-24. The occurrence of cystinuria in healthy young men and women. Ann. Internal Nfed., 6:183-92. Cystinuria: a review of some recent investigations. Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 4:437-49. The chemistry and metabolism of the compounds of sulfur. Ann. Rev. Biochem., 1:171-86. The role of amino acids in the animal organism. I. Cystinuria and cystine calculi, a surgical and medical problem. J. Mich. State ~led. Soc., 31 :249-53. The role of amino acids in the animal organism. II. The physiology of the amino acids. I. Mich. State Med. Soc., 31:307-13. 1933 With B. W. Chase. The metabolism of sulfur. XX. The rate of absorption of D~-methionine from the gastrointestinal tract of the white rat. i. Biol. Chem., 101: 735-40. \Vith A. K. Silberman. Pentose metabolism. III. The rate of ab- sorption of l-rhamnose and the formation of glycogen in the organism of the white rat after oral administration of l-rhamnose. J. Biol. Chem., 101 :741-51. With V. l. Tulane and A. A. Christman. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. VIII. Hydrazine in- toxication and hippuric acid synthesis in the rabbit. J. Biol. Chem., 103:141-50. With V. J. Tulane. Studies in the synthesis of hippuric acid in the animal organism. IX. A comparative study of the rate of synthesis and excretion of hippuric and phenaceturic acids by the rabbit. J. Biol. Chem., 103: 151-60. With A. K. Silberman. Glycogen formation after oral administra. tion of mannitol to white rats. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 31 :253-55 The chemistry and metabolism of the compounds of sulfur. Ann. Rev. Biochem., 2: 95-108. 1934 With R. W. Virtue. The metabolism of sulfur. XXI. Comparative

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 167 studies of the metabolism of Cystine and D~-methionine in the rabbit. I. Biol. Chem., 104: ~ 9-67. With R. W. Virtue. The iodometric determination of cystine in the urine. l. Biol. Chem., 104:415-21. With S. A. Lough. The reaction of nitrous acid with cystine and related sulfur-containing compounds. i. Biol. Chem., 104:601 - 10. With B. W. Chase. Comparative studies of the metabolism of amino acids. VI. The rate of absorption of leucine, valine, and their isomers from the gastrointestinal tract of the white rat. I. Biol. Chem., 106:315-21. With W. C. Lee. The effect of fasting, refeeding, and of variations in the cystine content of the diet on the composition of the tissue proteins of the white rat. i. Biol. Chem., 107:649-59. The progress of biochemistry. Review of Volume 3 of the Annual Review of Biochemistry. Science, 80:291-92. 1935 With R. L. Grant. Some products of partial hydrolysis of silk fibroin. I. Biol. Chem., 108: 667-73. With L. Frayser. The metabolism of sulfur. XXII. The cystine content of the hair and nails of cystinurics. I. Biol. Chem., 110:23-27. With B. H. Brown. Specific rotation of cystine excreted in cys- tinuria. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 32: 1100-~. The chemistry and metabolism of the compounds of sulfur. Ann. Rev. Biochem., 4: 149-68. Editorial review. The chief sulfur compounds in nutrition. T. Nutrition, 10:99-116. Sulfur. Cyclo. Med., Surg., Specialties, 8:922-29. With A. Bendana. The utilization of inulin for growth by the young white rat. l. Nutrition, 10:99-116. 1936 With B. H. Brown and F. R. White. The metabolism of sulfur. XXIII. The influence of the ingestion of cystine, cysteine, and methionine on the excretion of cystine in cystinuria. J. Biol. Chem., 114:171-84.

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168 With F. R. White and i. White. BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS 1937 The metabolism of sulfur. XXIV. The metabolism of taurine, cysteic acid, cystine, and of some peptides containing these amino acids. I. Biol. Chem., 117 : 663-71. With B. H. Brown. Cystine in normal and cystinuric human blood. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 36:487-88. 1938 With E. V. Heard. The metabolism of sulfur. XXV. Dietary methionine as a factor related to the growth and composition of the hair of the young white rat. I. Biol. Chem., 123:203-10. With E. Papageorge. Comparative studies of the metabolism of the amino acids. VII. Experimental alcaptonuria in the white rat. J. Biol. Chem., 123:211-20. With E. T. Papageorge and M. M. Frohlich. Excretion of homo- gentisic acid after oral administration of phenylalanine to al- captonuric subjects. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 38:742-45. With I. I. Routh. The enzymatic digestion of wool. I Biol. Chem., 1 24: 725-32. With W. D. Block. The amino acid content of cow and chimpanzee hair. ]. Biol. Chem., 1 25:561-70. With P. C. fen. Availability of dibenzoylcystine for growth of the young white rat. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med., 39:301~. 1939 With P. C. Jen. The metabolism of sulfur. XXVI. The metabolism of the betaine of cystine. I. Biol. Chem., 127:97-103. With R. A. Gortner, fir. Quantitative determination of selenium in tissues and feces. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical Edition, 11:198-200. With S. F. Velick and J. White. The synthesis of dicholylcystine and cholylcysteic acid. i. Biol. Chem., 127:477-81. Vitamins in theory and practice. Ann. Internal \led., 1 3: 749-54. With R. A. Gortner, Jr. The retention and excretion of selenium after the administration of sodium selenite to white rats. l. Pharmacol. Exp. Therap., 67:358-64. With L. D. Abbott, fir. Comparative studies of the metabolism of

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HOWARD BISHOP LEWIS 169 the amino acids. VIII. Glycine precursors. Availability of N- methylglycine, lYr,N-dimethylglycine, and betaine for the syn- thesis of hippuric acid by the rabbit. J. Biol. Chem., 131:479-87. Sulfur metabolism. Cyclo. Med., Surg., Specialties, 10:125-34. 1940 With i. Schultz and R. A. Gortner, fir. Dietary protein and the toxicity of sodium selenite in the white rat. l. Pharmacol. Exp. Therap., 68:292-99. With I. Schultz. The excretion of volatile selenium compounds after the administration of sodium selenite to white rats. i. Biol. Chem., 133: 199-207. With R. L. Garner. The metabolism of proteins and amino acids. Ann. Rev. Biochem., 9:277-302. 1941 The significance of the sulfur-containing amino acids in metabolism. Harvey Lectures, 36:159-87. With L. D. Abbott, [r. Comparative studies of the metabolism of the amino acids. IX. Glycine precursors. Availability of N- ethylglycine and glycolic acid for the synthesis of hippuric acid by the rabbit. I. Biol. Chem., 137: 535~3. With B. H. Brown. The metabolism of sulfur. XXVII. The distri- bution of sulfur in the ultrafiltrates of blood plasma. l. Biol. Chem., 138:705-16. With B. H. Brown. The metabolism of sulfur. XXVIII. The cystine content and sulfur distribution of ultrafiltrates of plasma after the administration of ~-cystine and D~-methionine to rabbits. I. Biol. Chem., 138:717-26. Charles Wallis Edmunds. Am. l. Pharm. Educ., 5:245-48. With F. R. Blood. The metabolism of sulfur. XXIX. S-Carboxy- methylcysteine. J. Biol. Chem., 139:407-12. With F. R. Blood. The metabolism of sulfur. XXX. Thiourea. I. Biol. Chem., 139:413-20. End products of nitrogen metabolism in animals. Biological Symposia, 5: 20-30. 1942 With W. J. Darby and J. R. Totter. The preparation of 4 (5~- hydroxymethylimidazole. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 64:463-64.