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MARSTO N TAYLO R B O GERT A pril 1 8,1 868-March 21,1954 BY LOUIS P HAM M ETT MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT was born in Flushing, N ew York, on April 18, 1868, and died in New York City on March 21, 1954. His long and intensely active professional life was connected intimately and continuously with Columbia Univer- sity, with the development of organized activity in chemistry in the United States, and with the fostering of international co- . . . Operatlon In science. Bogert entered Columbia College in 1886, having graduated from the Flushing Institute, a well-known private school. His undergraduate record was remarkable. It included the grade of A in every course; the award of honors in German, Spanish, Italian, botany, and geology; the captainship of a famous fresh- man crew; the college championship in tennis; honors in foot- ball, shot-putting, and pole vaulting; membership as a flute player in the college orchestra; and the presidency of his class in the sophomore and in the senior years. After Bogert was graduated with the degree of A.B. in 1890 he entered the new Columbia School of Mines in the course of analytical and applied chemistry. His academic record con- tinued to be distinguished, and he obtained the degree of Ph.B. in 1894. When, during this curriculum, it became time for him and seven or eight classmates to take a course in organic chemistry, C. E. Colby, who had taught the course as adjunct 97

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98 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS professor, became ill, and the school was unable to find a re- placement. Consequently, the students were told to teach them- selves, and Bogert, who during his career published several hundred scientific papers in organic chemistry, never had any formal instruction in the subject. Neither did he follow the fashion of a trip abroad for a German doctorate. Instead he accepted an appointment to give instruction in organic chem- istry at Columbia and advanced there through various grades, attaining the full professorship in 1904. He continued in that position with the title of Professor of Organic Chemistry until he retired in 1939 as Emeritus Professor of Organic Chemistry in Residence. Bogert arrived at Columbia at a time when, under the leadership of Burgess and of Butler, a small college was in the early stages of an expansion that led to a great university, and his abilities found their opportunity in that expansion. The graduate faculty of pure science had been established in 1892, and Bogert's first research publication, "A New Synthesis in the Quinazoline Group" (with A. H. Gotthelf), appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society in March of 1900. .From then on, brilliant young men flocked to his laboratory to be trained for careers in research and went forth to assume positions of importance in academic life and in the rapidly ex- panding chemical industry. It is a revealing comment on the times and the place that, while Bogert remained firm in his attachment to synthetic organic chemistry, many of his students refused to be typecast by their doctorates in that field: H. T. Beans became a pioneer in the revolution in instruction in analytical chemistry; I. M. Nelson initiated important advances in what later came to be called physical organic chemistry and in biological chemistry; M. Heidelberger became one of the world's great microbiologists; F. D. Snell founded one of this country's leading chemical consulting firms; G. Scatchard be-

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 99 came a distinguished physical chemist. These men were self- taught in their fields as Bogert had been in his. Bogert was a polished lecturer, and his teaching evidenced clearly his lifelong love affair with the intricacies of structural organic chemistry. For Columbia University he carried the usual burdens of membership on committees, and he served on the University Council in 1908-1911 and 1916-1919. He was a charter member of the Columbia chapters of Sigma Xi and of Phi Lambda Upsilon. Columbia recognized his accomplish- ments and his services to the university by an honorary Sc.D. degree in 1929, by the Egleston Medal in 1939, and by the Charles Frederick Cha'ndler Medal in 1949. He had received an honorary LL.D. degree from Clark University in 1909. Bogert's professional career accompanied a phenomenal growth in chemistry in the United States, and he was an active participant in the parallel development of professional organiza- tions. The American Chemical Society, which now numbers more than 100,000 members, had about one percent of that membership in the mid-nineties when Bogert began to take an active part in its affairs. In 1901 he was chairman of the New York section, and in 1907 and 1908 he was president of the national Society. In the latter position he introduced an or- ganizational reform that established divisions of the Society, each representing a major portion of the field of chemical science and technology. This averted a threatened schism that would have set up separate societies for applied and for pure chemists. He was awarded the Nichols Medal of the New York section in 1905 and the Priestley Medal of the national Society in 1938. Bogert was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1916. He led in the establishment of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Technology of the National Research Council in 1917 and was its first chairman. In 1898 he became one of one hundred fifty-four charter members of the Chemists' Club of New

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100 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS York, which has played an important role in the chemical life of metropolitan New York. The dining room of the club where Bogert presided at so many dinner meetings over the years has been named the Bogert Room in his honor. He was a member of the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Washington Academy of Sciences, the National Institute of Social Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Association of University Professors. He was a Fellow of the Chemical Society (London) and a Gold Medalist of the American Institute of Chemists; a member of Phi Beta Kappa, of Sigma Xi, and of Phi Lambda Upsilon; and a member of the Century Association, the Cosmos Club, the Royal Societies Club (London), the Hunters' Fraternity of America, and the Chevy Chase Club. During the First World War Bogert served as a consultant to many government agencies and as a member of numerous boards and committees. He was commissioned lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army in March 1918 and promoted to colonel in the Chemical Warfare Service in July of that year. He was honor- ably discharged from the army in May 1919. For the rest of his life his friends referred to him as Colonel, a form of address that he much enjoyed. From 1900 on, Bogert had been active in the New York section of the British Society of Chemical Industry, and in 1912-1913 he was president of the parent Society. He also lent his support to the New York section of the French Societe de Chimie Industrielle. In 1927 he was appointed to give lectures at the Charles University in Prague as the first Carnegie Pro- fessor of International Relations. While in Czechoslovakia, he was awarded honorary degrees by the Charles University and by the University of Bratislava and was made a Commander of the Order of the White Lion of Czechoslovakia. Following his participation over many years in international conferences on chemistry, he was elected president of the International Union

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 101 of Pure and Applied Chemistry in 1938. His devotion and tact were in large measure responsible for the successful re-establish- ment of that Union after the Second World War, and he him- self felt that that was one of his most valuable accomplishments. The first Bogert to come to this country arrived from Hol- land in 1663, the year before the British took New Amsterdam from the Dutch. Many of his descendants were prominent citizens of New York, and Marston's father, Henry Augustine Bogert, was a well-known lawyer in that city. He was also a graduate of Columbia College, as were Marston's three brothers. In 1893 Mars ton married Charlotte E. Hoogland. They had two daughters, Annette H. and Elsie B. The Bogerts's homes in New York City and at Belgrade Lakes, Maine, were happy and friendly ones. Bogert was an active participant in the affairs of the Reformed church. Bogert was distinguished in appearance, striking in per- sonality, and gifted with wit and eloquence. He was the perfect presiding officer at all public occasions and was constantly in demand for that function.

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102 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS BIBLIOGRAPHY KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS Am Perfum. Essent. Oil Rev. American Perfumer and Essential Oil Re- vlew Chem. Eng. News Chemical Engineering News Chem. ListyChemike Listy Chem. Rev. _ Chemical Reviews Columbia Univ. Q. Columbia University Quarterly Columbia Univ. Sch. Mines Q. _ Columbia University School of Mines Quarterly Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun. Collection of Czechoslovak Chemical Communications Color Trade l. - Color Trade Journal Drug Cosmetic Ind. - Drug and Cosmetic Industry Ind. Eng. Chem. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Ind. Eng. Chem. (News Ed.) Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, News Edition I. Am. Chem. Soc. Journal of the American Chemical Society I. Chem. Educ.Journal of Chemical Education I. Franklin Inst. Journal of the Franklin Institute J. Ind. Eng. Chem. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry J. Org. Chem. journal of Organic Chemistry J. Soc. Chem. Ind., London_ Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry, London Orig. Commun. 8th Int. Congr. Appl. Chem. Original Communications of the 8th International Congress of Applied Chemistry Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Rec. Trav. Chim. Pays-gas Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-gas 1897 Carbon compounds used in medicine, classified according to chem- ical structure. Columbia Univ. Sch. Mines Q., 19:47-88. 1898 Charles Edwards Colby (obituary notice). I. Am. Chem. Soc., 20: 139-41. 1900 With A. H. Gotthelf. A new synthesis in the quinazoline group. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 22:129-32. With A. H. Gotthelf. Direct synthesis of ketodihydroquinazolines from orthoamino acids. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 22:522-34.

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 103 1901 With L. Boroschek. Some experiments with the mononitroortho- phthalic acids. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 23:740-61. 1902 With D. C. Eccles. Production of the imides of succinic and glutaric acids by the partial hydration of the corresponding nitrites. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 24:20-25. With W. F. Hand. Synthesis of alkylketodihydroquinazolines from anthranilic nitrite. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 24:1031-50. 1903 Normal heptyl thiocyanate and some new alkyl esters of dithio- carbamic acid. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 25:289-91. With H. C. Breneman and W. F. Hand. Synthesis of alkylthioketo- dihydroquinazolines from anthranilic nitrite. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 25: 372-80. With L. Kohnstamm. p-Aminobenzonitrile. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 25:478-83. Mononitro-o-phthalic acids. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 25:767-70. With W. F. Hand. 3,5-Dibrom-2-aminobenzoic acid; its nitrite and the synthesis of quinazolines from the latter. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 25:935-47. With C. H. Zieme. Production of anisic acid by the oxidation of aniseed oil. Columbia Univ. Sch. Mines Q., 24:500-509. 1904 With H. T. Beans. Metaaminobenzonitrile and some of its deriva- tives. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 26:464-99. 1905 A card index stock list for use in university departments of organic chemistry. Science, 21: 750-52. With V. J. Chambers. Synthesis of 5-nitro-4-ketodihydroquina- zolines from 6-nitro-2-aminobenzoic acid, 6-nitro-2-acetyl- aminobenzoic acid, and from the corresponding nitro acetyl- anthranil. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 27:649-58. With A. W. Dox. Condensation of succinylosuccinic acid diethyl

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104 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS ester with guanidine. A derivative of 1,3,5,7-naphthotetrazine, a new heterocycle. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 27:1127-40. With A. Hoffman. Some acyl derivatives of homoanthranilic nitrite, and the 7-methyl-4-ketodihydroquinazolines prepared there- from. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 27: 1293-1301. With A. W. Dox. Condensation of succinylosuccinic acid diethyl ester with acetamidine: 2,6-dimethyl-4,8-dihydroxy-9,10-dihy- dro-1,3,5,7-naphthotetrazine. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 27:1302-5. With H. A. Sell. Synthesis of 2-methyl-5-nitro-4-ketodihydro- quinazolines from 6-nitro acetanthranil and primary amines. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 27:1305-10. With R. G. Wright. Some experiments on the nitro derivatives of fluorescein. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 27: 1310-16. With S. H. Steiner. Synthesis of 7-nitro-2-alkyl-4-ketodihydro- quinazolines from 4-nitro acetanthranilic acid, and from 4-nitro acetanthranil. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 27:1327-31. Notes from the Department of Organic Chemistry. Columbia Univ. Q., 8:70. With W. F Hand. 5-Brom-2-aminobenzoic acid and some of its derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 27:1476-84. 1906 With W. F. Hand. Preparation of 6-brom-4-ketodihydroquina- zolines from 5-brom-2-aminobenzoic acid and certain of its derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 28:94-104. With V. l. Chambers. 5-Amino-4-ketodihydroquinazoline and 5- amino-2-methyl~-ketodihydroquinazoline. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 28:207-13. With A. W. Dox. Condensation of succinylosuccinic esters with amidines. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 28:398-99. With R. R. Renshaw. Dimethyl-4-aminophthalate and certain of its acyl derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 28:617-24. With H. A. Sell. Quinazolines. XV. A 3-aminoquinazoline and the corresponding 3,3'-diquinazolyl, from 6-nitroacetanthranil and hydrazine hydrate. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 28:884-93. With E. P. Cook. Quinazolines. XVI. Synthesis of 6-nitro-2- methyl-4-ketodihydroquinazolines from 5-nitroacetanthranil and primary amines. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 28:1449-54. Edmund Howd Miller (obituary notice). Columbia Univ. Q., 9:37-

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 105 39: also in Zeitschrift fur Angewandte Chemie, 19:2141-42 and [. Am. Chem. Soc., 29:3-5. 1907 With I. D. Wiggin and i. E. Sinclair. Quinazolines. XVII. Syn- thesis of quinazoline carboxylic acids from 4-aminoisophthalic acid and from aminoterephthalic acid. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 29: 82-87. A strange case of poisoning. J. With H. A. Sell. Quinazolines. lanes and the products obtained by alkylating 2-alkyl-4-quin- azolones (2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinazolines). I. Am. Chem. Soc., 29:517-36. With i. M. Nelson. Quinazolines. XIX. Synthesis of 1,3,6,8- naphthotetrazines from p-diaminoterephthalic acid and from certain of its derivatives. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 29:729-39. T. Am. Chem. Soc., 29:239-40. XVIII. 2,3-Dialkyl-4-quinazo- 1908 American chemical societies. The American Chemical Society. 85:617. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 30: 164-82. Engineering and Mining.Journal, The stimulus given chemical research and invention by suitable recognition. l. Soc. Chem. Ind., London, 27: 266. With W. Klaber. Quinazolines. XX. Certain 7-nitro-2-methyl- 4-quinazolines from 4-nitroacetanthranil. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 30:807-16. With R. R. Renshaw. 4-Amino-o-phthalic acid and some of its derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 30:1135-44. Departmental notes. Columbia Univ. Q., 10: 372. 1909 Chemistry and the conservation of our mineral resources. (Address at 2d Joint Conference on Conservation of Natural Resources) Conservation, 1 b: 1 4-1 7. The function of chemistry in the conservation of our natural re- sources. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 31:125-54. With F. L. Jouard. 3-Amino-o-phthalic acid and certain of its derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 31:483-90. With C. E. May. Quinazolines. XXI. Certain quinazoline oxygen

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106 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS ethers of the type -N: C(OR)- and the isomeric -NR.CO- compounds. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 31: 507-13. Chemistry and the conservation of our forests and minerals. Colum- bia Univ. Sch. Mines Q., 30:217-38. With A. H. Kropff. Some amino and nitroamino derivatives of benzoic, metatoluic and metaphthalic acids. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 31 :841-48. With R. A. Gortner. Quinazolines. XXII. 2-Methyl-3-amino- 4-quinazolone and certain of its derivatives. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 31 :943-47. With A. H. Kropff. Quinazolines. XXIII. 6-Methyl-7-amino- quinazolones, 7-nitroquinazolone-6-carboxylic acids, and 1,3,7,9-naphthotetrazines. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 31:1071-78. With R. A. Gortner. Quinazolines. XXIV. Oxalyl anthranilic compounds and Quinazolines derived therefrom. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 32: 119-28. Chemistry and the conservation of our mineral resources. (Address at the Joint Conference between the National Conservation Com- mission and Governors of States, State Conservation Commissions, and Citizens' Conservation Committees) U.S. Senate Document No. 676, pp. 145-50. - 1910 The game butcher. Maine Woods and Maine Sportsman, 32:8. Chemistry and the conservation of our water resources. l. Franklin Inst., 169: 385-88; also in Chemical Engineer, 11: 127-28. Review of some recent investigations in the quinazoline group. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 32:784-95. Instability of alloxan. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 32:809-10. With C. G. Amend and V. l. Chambers. Quinazolines. XXV. Synthesis of 6- and 7-amino-2-methyl~-quinazolones from 4- and 5-acetaminoacetanthranils. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 32: 1297- 1312. With L. E. Wise. Some derivatives of p-aminobenzonitrile. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 32: 1494-99. With G. D. Beal and C. G. Amend. Quinazolines. XXVI. Syn- thesis of some stilbazoles, hydrazones and Schiff bases in the 4- quinazolone group. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 32: 1654-65.

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117 Twenty-five years' progress in aromatic chemicals. Am. Perfum. Essent. Oil Rev., 26:489-92. With W. S. Taylor. Thiazoles. XVII. An investigation of the connection between constitution and color in the thioflavine group. Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun., 3:480-98. MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 1932 Charles Frederick Chandler, 1836-1925. In: National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs, 14: 125-81. Washington, Na- tional Academy of Sciences. With D. Davidson. Some alpha-alkylcinnamic acids and their derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 54:334-38. With D. Davidson. Pyrimidine am derivatives. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 54:831. With l. A. Handy and D. Davidson. perfume and cosmetic industry. 10:25. Some technical problems of the Ind. Eng. Chem. (News Ed.), Charles Lathrop Parsons. Ind. Eng. Chem., 24:362-63. Science in the interest of peace. Columbia Alumni News, 23:5-7. With D. Davidson. Azo derivatives of the pyrimidines. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 18:215-22. Recent isoprene chemistry. Chem. Rev., 10:265-94. With H. G. Husted. Contribution to the pharmacology of the benzothiazoles. journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 45:189-208. With T. Hasselstrom. Investigations in the retene field. II. alpha- Retene carboxylic acid and some of its derivatives. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 18:417-22. A layman watches pharmacy's re-awakening. Of Pharmacy, 9: 179-82. New York Journal With D. Davidson. Isovioluric acid (alloxan-6-oxime). Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 18: 490-96. With H. G. Husted. Thiazoles. XVIII. Synthesis of 2-phenyl- benzothiazole-5-carboxylic acid and derivatives. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 54:3394-98. Structure of vitamin A and the synthesis of ionenes. Science, 76: 475-76. With D. Davidson. Oxidation colors derived from 5,6-diaminoura- cil. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 54:4754.

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118 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS 1933 The mechanism of the ionene synthesis. Science, 77:197-98. Process for the synthesis of phenanthrene and of phenanthrene de- rivatives. Science, 77:289. With I). Davidson. Preparation of 5-aminouracil and of some of its derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 55:1667-68. With R. B. Conklin. Synthesis of acenaphthene-peri-metathiazines and of some dyes derived therefrom. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 55: 1705-10. With R. B. Conklin. Constitution of certain acenaphthenesulfonic acids. Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun., 5:187-203. With E. G. \IcDonough. Autoxidation of aldehydes. Drug Cosmet. Ind., 32:312-13, 332-38, 514, 533-34, 536, 538, 540. With R. O. Roblin, Jr. Formation of cyclic acetals from aldehydes or ketones and alkylene oxides. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 55:3741~5. With S. .T- Marion. Chemical examination of the volatile oil of Sarothra gentianoides L. and the detection therein of normal nonane. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 55:4187-96. With G. S. Stomatoff. The synthesis of some alkylphenanthrenes and alkylphenanthrene-10-carboxylic acids. Rec. Trav. Chim. Pays-gas, 52: 584-92. 1934 With D. Davidson. Synthesis of condensed polynuclear hydrocar- bons by the cyclodehydration of aromatic alcohols. I. Indanes. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 56:185-90. With I). Davidson and R. O. Roblin, in Synthesis of polynuclear hydrocarbons by the cyclodehydration of aromatic alcohols. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 56:248. With P. M. Apfelbaum. Synthesis of 1,1,2,6-tetramethyltetralin and the constitution of Irene. Science, 79:280. Recent contributions to our knowledge of the chemistry of vitamin A. J. Chem. Educ., 11: 203-7. With D. Davidson and P. M. Apfelbaum. Synthesis of condensed polynuclear hydrocarbons by the cyclodehydration of aromatic alcohols. II. The synthesis of ionenes. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 56: 959-63. With T. Hasselstrom. Investigations in the retene field. III. Some

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119 new nitroretenols, nitrofluorenones and related compounds. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 56: 983-85. MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT Poison ivy. Drug Cosmet. Ind., 34:507. New Charabot process for floral oils. Am. Perfum. Essent. Oil Rev.. 29:124. With 1). Price. Synthesis of certain methoxychalcones and meth- oxy-benzal-beta-coumaranones from methoxyacetophenones and nitrobenzaldehydes. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 56:2442~9. With D. Price and A. Dingwall. Influence of chemical constitution upon visible color and other tinctorial properties in the case of certain structurally related methoxychalcones and methoxy- benzalcoumaranones. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 56:2483-87. 1935 With R. O. Roblin, fir., and D. Davidson. Synthesis of condensed polynuclear hydrocarbons by the cyclodehydration of aromatic alcohols. III. The cyclization of some phenylated alcohols and related olefins. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 57:151-59. With E. B. Marr. Quinazolines. XXXIX. Synthesis of quinazoline derivatives structurally analogous to the angostura alkaloids galiopine and galipine. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 57:729-32. With E. B. Marr. Quinazolines. XL. Synthesis of a quinazoline derivative structurally related to papaverine. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 57: 1329-30. With S. E. Cairncross. Quinazolines. XLI. Synthesis of some new 4-quinazolone derivatives from p-bromoaniline, formaldehyde and hydrochloric acid. Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun., 7: 548-54. With D. Davidson. Preparation of aromatic alcohols by the crossed Cannizzaro reaction with formaldehyde. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 57:905. With B. Naiman. Thiazoles. XX. Synthesis of benzothiazoles from aldehydes and o-aminothiophenol. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 57: 1529-33. With B. Naiman. Thiazoles. XXI. Synthesis of indirubin types by condensation of 2-methylbenzothiazoles with isatins. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 57:1660-63. With M. G. Ast. Thiazoles. XXII. Synthesis of some 6-methoxy- and 5,6-dimethoxybenzothiazoles and of certain dyes obtainable therefrom. Rec. Trav. Chim. Pays-gas, 54:917-30.

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120 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS With T. Hasselstrom. Investigations in the retene field. IV. The synthesis of 6-thioretenol and of certain related and derived compounds. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 57: 1579-81. With T. Hasselstrom. Certain sapinic acids obtained from various species of pine and spruce. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 57:2118-21. With V. [. Mikeska. Synthesis of certain phenylated benzoxazoles and derivatives. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 57:2121-24. With V. i. Mikeska. fain benzoxazole dyes. Preparation and tinctorial properties of cer- . Am. Chem. Soc., 57:2513-17. 1936 With S. E. Cairncross. Quinazolines. ~ , . ~ . . . XLII. Synthesis of certain new 3,3-ct~nyctroqu~nazo~ne derivatives from p-aminobenzoic acid, formaldehyde and hydrochloric acid. Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun., 8:57-66. With I. G. Hildebrand, in The Beckmann rearrangement of certain 2-alkyl cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone oximes. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 58: 650-53. With D. E. Adelson. Investigations in the retene field. V. The structure of 6-acetylretene. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 58:653-54. With E. A. Robinson. Synthesis of substituted 5,6-benzocinchoninic acids by the Doebner and by the Pfitzinger reactions. I. Org. Chem., 1:65-75. Connection between odor and constitution in the benzothiazole group. III. Am. Perfum. Essent. Oil Rev., 32:51. With D. E. Adelson and T. Hasselstrom. Investigations in the retene field. VI. Retenediphenic acid and some of its deriva- tives. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 58:871-73. The onward march of synthetic organic chemistry. Chemist, 13: 535-49. A spirane by-product in the phenanthrene synthesis. Science, 84: 44. With D. Papa. Quinazolines. XLIII. Synthesis of a quinazoline derivative structurally analogous to cusparine. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 58:1701-3. With V..~. Mikeska and N. T. Farinacci. Allotropic forms of di- phenylsulfone and the determination of their transition point. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 58:1869-71.

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 121 With R. M. Orcutt. Synthesis of 1,1-dimethyl-6,7-methylenedi- oxytetralin. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 58:2055-56. With R. M. Orcutt. Synthesis of 1,1,2-trimethyl-5,6-methylenedi- oxyindane from safrole. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 58: 2057-59. With l. G. Hildebrand. An efficient expansible mechanical stirrer and its use in organic syntheses. Collect. Czech. Chem. Com- mun., 8:391-95. With H. v. B. joy. Thiazines. III. Synthesis of cyanine dyes of the peri-naphthometathiazine series. l. Org. Chem., 1 :236~4. With D. Perlman and D. Davidson. Synthesis of phenanthrenes from hydroxyl derivatives of beta-phenylethylcyclohexanes and the nature of the by-product. l. Org. Chem., 1:288-99. With D. Perlman and D. Davidson. Synthesis and properties of certain spiranes from phenylpropylcyclanols. l. Org. Chem., 300-304. With D. E. Adelson. Retene field. VII. Certain fluorenones and phenanthridones from retenediphenic acid. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 58:2236-39. The research chemist, mankind's devoted and indispensable servant. Science, 84:425-30. 1937 With D. E. Adelson. Retene field. VIII. Synthesis of 3'-methyl- 5,6-cyclopentenoretene. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 59:399-401. With R. B. Akin. Synthesis of 1,4-dimethyl-6,7-methylene di- oxyphenanthrene and of certain substituted 9,10-dimethyl- 1,2,b,6-dibenzanthracenes. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 59:1564-67. With R. B. Akin and G. S. Stamatoff. Synthesis of 1,4-dimethyl- phenanthrene by the Pschorr reaction and the nonidentity of the product with the 1,4-dimethylphenanthrene of Bardhan and Sengupta. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 59: 1268-72. With D. Perlman. Dehydration of beta-phenylethyl-3-methylcyclo- hexan-l-ol. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 59:2534-36. With G. W. Pope. The constitution of the methylionones. I. Org. Chem., 2:276-87. 1938 Carotenoids: the polyene pigments of plants and animals. Chapter IV in: Organic Chemistry: An Advanced Treatise, ed.

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122 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS by H. Oilman, vol. II, pp. 1138-1220. New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Chandler Centenary: introductory address. 118-20. With D. Papa and D. Perlman. Synthesis of 1,4-dimethylphenan- threne by cyclodehydration methods. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 60: 319-21. With E. C. Sterling. Ind. Eng. Chem., 30: An approach to the synthesis of fichtelite. Science, 87: 196, 234. With P. M. Apfelbaum. Synthesis of 1,1,2,6-tetramethyltetralin and the constitution of Irene. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 60:930-33. With D. Price and D. Davidson. Synthesis of condensed polynuclear hydrocarbons by the cyclodehydration of aromatic alcohols. VII. Cyclodehydration involving the Wagner rearrangement. I. Org. Chem., 2:540-45. The chemist as defender of his fatherland. Science, 88:19-21. From the cradle to the grave. (Priestly Medal address) Ind. Eng. Chem. (News Ed.), 16:553-61. With R. M. Orcutt. Application of cyclodebydration reactions to some safrole derivatives. Roczniki Chemii, 18:732-38. It chimico difensore delta patria. Atti del X Congresso Interna- zionale di Chemica, 1: 307-12. 1939 With I. Werner. Synthesis from thujaketone of some new hydro- terpenoids. i. Org. Chem., 3:578-87. With D. E. Adelson. Chemistry of retene. Chem. Rev., 24:135-76. With E. C. Sterling. Synthesis of 12-methylperhydroretene (abie- tane) and its non-identity with fichtelite. J. Org. Chem., 4:20- 29. With C. A. Fetscher. Quinazolines. XLIV. Synthesis of some new quinazoline derivatives of veratrole akin to alkaloids. I. Org. Chem., 4:71-88. With M. Levitz and D. Perlman. Products of the cyclizing dehydra- tion of 1-beta-phenylethylcyclohexanol-1 and the synthesis of spirocyclohexane-l,l-indanone-3. Science, 90: 114-15. With H. H. Fox. Thiazoles. XXIII. Synthesis of certain benzo- thiazoles structurally related to quinoline antimalarials. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 61:2013-17. With J. T. Cassaday. Synthesis of 1,4-dimethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT 123 phenanthrene from para-xylylacetic acid and 6-nitroveratralde- hyde by the Pschorr reaction. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 61:2461-63. With i. T. Cassaday. Synthesis of some new 1,4-dimethylphenan- threnes structurally related to morphol. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 61 :3055-57. With I. T. Cassaday. Application of the Pschorr reaction to alpha- (para-xylylene)-2,5-di-~6'-aminodimethylcaffeic acid). Synthesis of 9,10-dimethyl-2',3',6',7'-tetramethoxy- 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthra- cene. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 61:3058-61. With R. M. Orcutt. Synthesis of 2-methylphenanthrene from 1- methone. l. Org. Chem., 4:543-47. International Union of Chemistry. Ind. Eng. Chem. (News Ed.), 17:710; also in Science, 90:491-92. 1940 With L. T. Coggeshall, L. H. Cretcher, L. F. Small, and T. H. Soll- mann. The National Research Council Committee on Chemo- therapy Origin and Subjects. News Ed. (Am. Chem. Soc.), 18: 657-58. With E. I. Mills, fir. Synthesis of some new pyrimidines and uric acids from cystamine. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 62:1173-80. 1941 With D. D. \Iossman. Bergamot Oil. American Pharmaceutical Association Monograph No. 2, 122 pp. With R. M. Orcutt. Scianthrene and the synthesis of 1-isopropyl- 7-methylphenanthrene. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 63:127-31. With S. A. Cassaday. Retene field. XI. Synthesis of retopyridines (naphthoquinolines) from 3-aminoretene. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 63:703-8. With S. A. Cassaday. Retene field. XII. Synthesis of 10-phenan- thrt2,3-b~azepine derivatives by the Beckmann rearrangement of a tetrahydrobenzoretene ketoxime. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 1452-~. With A. A. Plentl. Synthesis of tricyclic hydrocarbons related to stilbestrol. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 63:989-95. With A. A. Plentl. Optical isomers of cis-9-methyl-l~ecalone. J. Org. Chem., 6:669-83. With O. N. Jitkow. Relationship between structure and odor in the case of certain derivatives of 2,2,4-trimethyl-~3-cyclohexenealde- hyde. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 63:1979-84.

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124 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS With A. N. Nathan. Synthesis of pyrimidine and purine deriva- tives of cystamine and a new type of thiazolidenopyrimidine. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 63:2361-66. With H. H. Fox. Thiazoles. XXIV. Some interesting exchange reactions between 6-alkoxy-7-nitrobenzothiazoles and alcohols. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 63:2996-99. . 1942 Harry Linn Fisher: career and accomplishments. Chemist, 19:19- 27. With M. Levitz. Dehydrogenation. II. Spirocyclopentane-1,1'- tetralin. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 64:1719-20. With E. l. Masters. Thiazoles. XXV. Some new thiazolidinopyri- midines of barbituric acid type. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 64:2709-12. The influence of Egloff on the progress of American chemistry. Chemist, 19: 270-74. With E. I. Masters. Thiazoles. XXVI. Some acyl derivatives of 2-aminothiazole. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 64:2712-13. 1943 With F. Linsker. Amidino arsenicals. I. p-Amidinophenylarsonic acid and 4,4'-diamidinoarsenobenzene. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 65: 932-35. With F. Brody. Synthesis of a pyridine analog of hydnocarpic acid and of a lower homolog. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 65:1075-80. With F. Brody. Thiazoles. XXVII. A thiazole analog of hydno- carpic acid. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 65:1080-82. With M. Levitz. Dehydrogenation. III. Dehydrogenation of a methyl spiran. i. Org. Chem., 8:253-55. With K. C. Frisch. The search for superior antimalarials. I. Ex- periments in the veratrole group. i. Org. Chem., 8:331-38. With K. C. Frisch and M. Silverman. Unexpected rearrangement in the application of the Skraup reaction to 3-nitro-4-aminovera- trole. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 65:2432-34. Harrison E. Howe. Chem. Eng. News, 21:678. 1944 With K. Frisch. The search for superior antimalarials. II. Syn- thesis of 6,7-dimethoxyquinoline derivatives and of some in- cidental compounds. J. Org. Chem., 9:338-51.

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MARSTON TAYLOR BOGERT With F. Linsker. Amidino arsenicals. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 66: 191-92. 1945 125 II. Some trivalent arsenicals. Memorial meeting in honor of Marie Sklodowska Curie. Bulletin of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences in America, 3:200- 201. With NI. Levitz. The search for superior drugs for tropical diseases. I. Derivatives of quininaldehyde and 6,7-dimethoxycinchoninal- dehyde. I. Org. Chem., 10: 341-46. With F. NIisani. The search for superior drugs for tropical diseases. II. Synthetic studies in the quinoline and phenanthroline series. Skraup and Conrad-Limpach-Knorr reactions. I. Org. Chem., 10: 347-65. With F. Misani. The search for superior drugs for tropical diseases. III. Further experiments in the quinoline group. I. Org. Chem., 10:458-63. 1946 With M. Silverman. Synthesis of some indene and dihydronaph- thalene derivatives related to stilbestrol. J. Org. Chem., 11:34- 49. With F. Linsker. N-oxides of atebrin and plasmochin. i. Am. Chem. Soc., 68: 192-93. Addresses given at Parsons testimonial banquet: Introductory marks. Chem. Eng. News, 24:1204. The International Union of Chemistry. Chem. Eng. News, 24: 2608-9. 1947 The rebuilding and advance of the International Union of Chem- istry. Chem. Eng. News, 25:1426-28; also in Chemistry and In- dustry, 447-49. Wtih J. Ehrlich. Experiments in the veratrole and quinoxaline groups. l. Org. Chem., 12: 522-34. - lg49 International organization of chemists. 95. Chem. Eng. News, 27:1992-

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126 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS GERMAN PATENTS 228,796, Klasse 22a, Gruppe 1 Verfahren zur Darstellung von Azo- farbstoffen 236,848, Klasse 12a, Gruppe 6 Verfahren zur Darstellung van 2,4- Diamino-i-phtalsaeure bezw. ihre Acidylderivate U.S. PATENTS 1,012,055, Azo Dyestuffs 1,032,734 Products obtainable from 4,6-diamino-1,3-xylene and process of making 1,574,337 Dyestuff Intermediates

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