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REMINGTON KELLOGG October 5, 1892-May 8, 1969 BY FRANK C. WHITMORE, JR. WITH BIBLIOGRAPHY COMPILED BY JANE KNAPP REMINGTON KELLOGG, retired assistant secretary of the Smith- sonian Institution and director of the United States Na- tional Museum, died of a heart attack on May 8, 1969, in his seventy-seventh year, at his home in Washington, D.C. He had been recuperating from a broken pelvis suffered in a fall on the ice the previous January, but, except for this period, he had been constantly and productively engaged in research at the national museum for more than forty-nine years. Retire- ment, which came in 1962, brought him welcome relief from administrative duties and an opportunity to intensify his study of fossil marine mammals. The years 1962 to 1969 were among his most productive. Arthur Remington Kellogg, as he was christened (he early dropped "Arthur" from his name), was born in Davenport, Iowa, on October 5, 1892, the son of Clara Louise (Martin) and Rolla Remington Kellogg. He was descended from colonial stock on both sides of the family. One ancestor, Sergeant Joseph Kellogg, came from England in 1651, settling first in Farmington, Connecticut, and finally at Hadley, Massachusetts, in 1661. Sergeant Kellogg helped to defeat the Connecticut Indian tribes at Turner's Falls, Massachusetts, in 1676. Kellogg's paternal grandfather taught Latin and Greek in high school in Davenport, Iowa. His father was a printer who 159

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160 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS at one time or another was owner of several printing shops. Remington's mother was a school teacher before her marriage. The Kelloggs moved to Kansas City, Missouri, when Remington was six years old. Of his early years Dr. Kellogg said, "I do not recall that I disliked any particular study. Westport High School in Kansas City was considered at the time to be an academic rather than a manual training high school. The courses given were in accordance with a regular schedule of four years of English, history, mathematics, science, and Latin.... "From the fourth grade onward while attending public grade and high schools most of my spare time outside of school hours was devoted to studying wild life and by the time I graduated from grade school I had prepared a small collection of mounted birds and mammals." Before completing his high school studies, Kellogg had decided to attend a university where there were natural history collections. This interest led him to the University of Kansas, the training ground for many famous naturalists. In order to . ~ .. . in the nearby woods, save enough money for college, Remington found it necessary to find employment as a salesman in a dry-goods store, as a worker in the smokehouse of a packing plant, and as a cement worker on a construction crew. In his first years at the uni- versity he cooked his own meals and delivered papers. He sold trunks as a traveling salesman during the summer after fresh- man year. At the university he concentrated first in entomology; later he changed his field to mammals. From 1913 to 1916 he was a taxonomic assistant for mammals under Charles D. Bunker, curator of birds and mammals in the Museum of Natu- ral History at the university. His first paper, published in 1914. resulted from this museum work. Bunker took Kellogg to his cabin, where he instructed him in skinning and preserving vertebrate specimens. In Kellogg's senior year, when an instruc-

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 161 tor died, he helped give a class in ornithology. He received his A.B. in January 1915 and his M.A. in 1916. In Kellogg's freshman year there began a lifelong friendship with Alexander Wetmore. In 1911, Wetmore joined the Bureau of Biological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and helped Kellogg in getting summer jobs with the survey, con- ducting field surveys of plant and animal life in the West. The two men worked closely together for many years in the Smith- sonian Institution, first as curators and later in administrative positions, when Wetmore was secretary of the Smithsonian and Kellogg was director of the United States National Museum. Another admired friend of undergraduate days was Edward A. Preble of the Biological Survey. Preble was an editor and fre- quent contributor to the magazine Nature (not to be confused with the British journal), then published in Washington, D.C. Among many wildlife monographs he published a study of the fur seals of the Pribilof Islands. Immediately after graduation, in the winter of 1915-1916, Kellogg worked for the Biological Survey in southeastern Kansas and, in the following summer, in North Dakota. Of this assignment he said, "I remember the first year I went out to Wahpeton, North Dakota, the first day the chief of the survey took me out and we walked all over the area. Then he said, 'Well, I'm leaving. You know all about it.' From then on I was alone. I had to cover everythingplants and animalsand write a report. It didn't faze me a bitI guess I didn't know any better." While at the University of Kansas, Kellogg made his first acquaintance with marine mammals, in the form of skeletons of white whale, porpoise, walrus, and seal. In the fall of 1915, at the end of his summer's fieldwork, the Biological Survey paid his way to Washington, D. C. He made a tour of museums in the eastern United States, which undoubtedly gave him further

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162 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS opportunity to examine whales, pinnipeds, and sirenians. At about this time he made His decision to study the evolution of marine mammals, and in the fall of 1916 he entered the Uni- versity of California at Berkeley to concentrate in zoology. At Berkeley, Kellogg met several men who became lifelong friends and in various ways influenced his professional growth. Perhaps the most revered of these was David Starr Jordan, ichthyologist and president of Stanford. Joseph Grinnell, director of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, stimulated Kellogg's interest in ornithology. Chester Stock, a fellow graduate student and later professor of vertebrate paleon- tolog~r at California Institute of Technology, shared many hours of discussion of evolution. The most lasting influence resulting from the R~rkelev velure , . . ~ . . ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ _ ~ ~ _ ~ ~ v was gnat or Jonn a;. Merriam. Kellogg was given a teaching fellowship and was invited by Merriam to study the fossil record of the seals, sea lions, and walruses whose remains had been found in Pacific Coast TertiarY formations. This orolect re- ~ _ _ ~ ~ _ ~ _ __ ~r _ 1 1 _ _ ~ ~ . - 1 J ~ OLllL~= 111 ~C;llUg~ ~ 1li-5l important papers on marine mammals (1921 and 1922), both dealing with fossil pinnipeds. With the thoroughness, coupled with deceptively modest titles, that was to characterize his published work throughout his career, the second of these, entitled "Pinnipeds from Miocene and Pleisto- cene Deposits of California," incorporated a critical review of the literature of fossil pinnipeds of the world. This work re- mains today the base upon which modern research on fossil pinnipeds begins. In the summer of 1917, Kellogg again did fieldwork for the Biological Survey. He went to Montana and then to California, where he studied the Microtus californicus group of meadow mice. A monograph resulting from this work was published in 1918. Graduate work was interrupted by service in World War I.

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 163 On December 11, 1917, Kellogg enlisted in the 20th Engineer Battalion at San Francisco, and on February 19, 1918, he sailed from Hoboken for France. By a stroke of luck for a naturalist, Kellogg was transferred in May 1918 to the Central Medical Department Laboratory at Dijon, where he was promoted to sergeant and found himself under the command of Major E. A. Goldman, one of the last of the general field naturalists. One of their major assignments was rat control in the trenches and at the base ports. During his service in France, Kellogg ob- served and collected birds and small mammals and sent collec- tions to Joseph Grinnell at Berkeley and Charles D. Bunker at the University of Kansas. His notebook contains almost daily observations from November 17, 1918, to February 23, 1919. The climax of this period was a motor trip that he took between January 29 and February 23 with Major Goldman and Lt. A. C. Chandler from Dijon to Toul and "such other places in depts. of Meurthe-et-Moselle, Meuse, and Ardennes as is necessary to carry out instructions of Chief Surgeon, in connection with preparation of medical history of war." During the period of this reconnaissance, his notebook lists thirty species of birds and five of small mammals. Upon his return to Berkeley, Kellogg gave a talk to the Northern Division of the Cooper Ornithological Club entitled "Experiences with Birds of France," and in 1919 he published, with Francis Harper, who had also been in the Army in France, a Christmas day bird census made at Is-sur-Tille in the Depart- ment of Cote d' Or, where the Army Medical Laboratory was situated. In June 1919 Kellogg returned to the United States. He was discharged from the Army at Newport News, Virginia, on July 2 and returned immediately to Berkeley to complete the resi- dence requirements for the Ph.D. He transferred from zoology to vertebrate paleontology under Merriam, resumed his teach-

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164 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS ing fellowship for a semester, and then, on January 1, 1920, was appointed assistant biologist in the Biological Survey, with headquarters in Washington, D. C. While at Berkeley, Kellogg had met a fellow student, Mar- ':,uerite E. Henrich, a native Californian. They were married in Berkeley on December 21, 1920, and set up their home in Washington, where, with many interludes of travel, they were to spend their entire married life. For the next eight years Kellogg performed varied assign- ments, in field and laboratory, for the Biological Survey. He was well suited to such work by inclination and training and by a tremendously retentive memory and systematic use of the literature. All his life he was an inveterate reader and maker of reference cards, with annotations, filed taxonomically, by subject, and by author. Much of Kellogg's work with the Biological Survey had to do with the feeding habits of hawks and owls, which entailed both field observation and the examination of hundreds of pellets. Observations were also made of the feeding habits of diving ducks, which were suspected of depleting trout popula- tions. In a travel authorization issued in 1920, Kellogg is referred to as assistant in economic ornithology. Between 1920 and 1927, a great deal of time was devoted to the drudgery of examining pellets and stomach contents from owls and hawks. These data were published (1926) in H. L. Stoddard's Report on Cooperative Quail Investigation and in his book, The Bobwhite Quail; also in Alfred O. Gross (1928), Progress Report of the New England RufJed Grouse Investiga- tions Committee. Concurrently with his ornithological work, Kellogg spent much time studying toads, mainly museum specimens, includ- ing examination of stomach contents. In 1922 he published a Biological Survey circular, one of a number that he wrote, on the toad, and during that year he planned to revise the taxon-

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 165 only of the toads of North and Middle America. The entire project was not completed, but it did result in an important monograph, Mexican tailless amphibians in the United States National Museum (1932~. Another dietary study was made of alligators. In the 1920s, there was a controversy over whether alligators should be pro- tected from indiscriminate hunting, and Kellogg was given the task of finding out how predatory they actually were. He pub- lished a technical bulletin of the U.S. Department of Agricul- ture, The Habits and Economic Importance of Alligators, in 1929. At about the time Kellogg joined the Biological Survey, his professor, John C. Merriam, was appointed president of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Merriam arranged an appointment for Kellogg as a research associate of the Carnegie Institution, a position he held from 1921 to 1943. Annual re- search grants from the institution helped Kellogg to carry on research on marine mammals concurrently with his extensive projects for the Biological Survey. It was decided that an inves- tigation of the earliest known predecessors of the typical ceta- ceans, the Archaeoceti, found in older Tertiary rocks, would be supported by a grant. In October 1929, Kellogg went to Choc- taw and Washington Counties, Alabama, to collect zeuglodont material to supplement the archaeocete collections in the Na- tional Museum. The monograph resulting from this study, A Review of the Archaeoceti, published in 1936, is a landmark in cetology. Merriam's increased administrative duties left him little time for paleontology, and he encouraged Kellogg to begin a project that Merriam had long had in mind: the study of the marine mammals of the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland. Beginning in the early 1920's, Kellogg devoted many weekends to collect- ing, adding significantly to the collections of his predecessors, William Palmer and Frederick W. True. By the time of Kel-

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166 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS logy's death, the collection of fossil marine mammals in the National Museum was probably the best in the world. The most fascinating aspect of marine mammals is the way in which existing mammalian organs have been modified for life in the sea. Kellogg decided to make this theme the basis for his doctoral thesis, which, because of the war and other matters, had yet to be written. Using the literature, but also drawing heavily on his own original studies, he wrote "The History of WhalesTheir Adaptation to Life in the Water" (1928), for which he was awarded the Ph.D. by the University of California. This paper is still the best summary of the subject. In 1928, Kellogg transferred to the U.S. National Museum as assistant curator of mammals under Gerritt S. Miller, Jr. He became curator in 1941. With his transfer to the Smithsonian, he was able to devote more time to study of marine mammals. He has described the course of his research as follows: "In the earlier stages the marine mammal studies were largely descriptive, but as they progressed the importance of fossil cetaceans for geological correlation became apparent. As a collateral investigation, the recorded occurrences of migrating whales in the several oceans were collated. These observations confirmed the belief, more recently supported by whale mark- ing, that the Recent whalebone whales make seasonal migra- tions from tropical calving grounds to the food banks located on or near the colder waters of the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The location of fossil remains tends to confirm the conclusion that the precursors of present day whalebone whales followed similar migration routes, and that similar types of fossilized skeletal remains occur in geological formations of correspond- ing age on the old shores that bordered these oceans. "Examination of fossilized cetacean skeletons excavated in sedimentary strata deposited on ancient beaches, estuaries and river deltas revealed that although these air breathing mammals had been adapted for habitual aquatic existence, no funda-

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 167 mentally new structures had been added in the course of geo- logic time, and that the functioning of the entire body is conditioned by adjustments of old organs to an exclusive life in the water" (McGraw-Hill, Modern Men of Science, 1968, pp. 283-84~. The Archaeocetithe most primitive of the three suborders of whales, dating from Eocene and early Oligocene timeare well represented in fossil collections. So also are whales from the Miocene Epoch, a period of tremendous evolutionary radia- tion of Cetacea. Much less well known are the Oligocene ances- tors of modern whale types. While he was treating the Archaeoceti systematically, Kel- logg simultaneously worked on the description of Miocene Cetacea from both coasts of North America. This study was of major concern to him from the time of his description of the humpback whale Megaptera miocaena, in 1922, to his last paper, "Cetothere Skeletons from the Miocene Choptank For- mation of Maryland and Virginia," published the week after his death. The difference in Kellogg's approach to the Archaeoceti and the Miocene Cetacea is significant and proper. The Archaeo- ceti are unified by primitive characteristics that permit standard taxonomic treatment, whereas the variation among the Miocene forms is such that Kellogg, rightly, usually refused to assign genera to families or to express opinions as to their relationships to modern forms. At the same time his meticulous treatment of both specimens and literature clarified many a taxonomic prob- lem, even though it was as yet insoluble because of paucity of data. An example is his treatment of the Squalodontidae (1923), published under the title "Description of Two Squalo- donts Recently Discovered in the Calvert Cliffs, Maryland, and Notes on the Shark-Toothed Cetaceans." All genera as- signed to the family are recorded and are either accepted, reassigned, or placed in limbo as insufficiently known. This last

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 179 An apparently new Hyla from E1 Salvador. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash.. 41:123-24. Programme of the final public examination for the degree of doctor of philosophy. University of California, Graduate Division, 6 pp. Vertebrates in the marine Tertiary formations of western Oregon. In: Stratigraphic Relations of Western Oregon Oligocene For- mations, ed. by H. G. Schenck. Univ. Calif. Dep. Geol. Bull., 18~1~: 1-50. Determinations of the food of 95 snowy owls and of 139 goshawks. In: Progress Report of the New England RufJed Grouse Investi- gations Committee, by A. O. Gross. Boston, Massachusetts Fish and Game Commission. 8 pp. Report of researches by Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleontological Researches. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 27, pp. 386-87. History of the cetacean fore limb. Exhibition representing results of research activities. Carnegie Institution of Washington, De- cember 14, pp. 15-16. 1929 Extinct ocean-living mammals from Maryland. Smithson. Inst. Explor. Field-Work, 1928, Publ. 3011, pp. 27-32. What is known of the migrations of some of the whalebone whales. Smithson. Inst., Ann. Rep., 1928, Publ. 2997, pp. 467-94. A new fossil toothed whale from Florida. lO pp. Am. Mus. Novit. no. 389. Report of researches by Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleontological Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 28, pp. 389-90. A new cetothere from southern California. Univ. Calif. Dep. Geol. Bull. 18(15):449-57. The habits and economic importance of alligators. U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture Technical Bulletin no. 147, pp. 1-36. 1930 With others. Preliminary draft convention for the regulation of whaling. League of Nations Economic Committee. Report to

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180 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS the Council on the work of the thirty-second session. Official no. C353.M.146.1930. II, pp. 8-11. Report of researches by Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleontological Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. (Carnegie Inst Wash Year Book no. 29, pp. 397-98. _ i, 1931 Pelagic mammals from the Temblor formation of the Kern River region, California. Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences, 19~12):217-397. Whaling statistics for the Pacific Coast of North America. l. Mammal., 1241~:73-77. Ancient relatives of living whales. Work, 1930, Publ. 3111, pp. 83-90. Whales. U.S. Congress, Senate, Special Committee on Wild Life Resources, Hearings on the conservation of whales and other marine mammals, 72d Congr., 1 st sees., pp. 6-9. The last phase in the history of whaling. Whales. Smithson. Inst. Explor. Field- U.S. Congress, Senate, Special (committee on Wild Life Resources, Hearings on the conservation of whales and other marine mammals, 72d Congr., 1st sees., pp. 20-29; also in: Lewis Radcliffe, Economics of the whaling industry with relationship to the convention for the regulation of whaling. U.S. Congress, Senate, Special Com- mittee on the Conservation of Wild Life Resources, 73d Congr., 2d sees., pp. 57-66. Report on examination of 1098 Marsh Hawk pellets from Leon County, Florida. In: The Bobwhite Quail. Its Habits, Preserva- . ' ~ ~ ~ ~ T T ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ T _ ~ r _ 1_ ~1~ 1 _ ~ ~ i___ ~ tzon and increase, by H. L. Untoward. New York, names ~cr~- ner's Sons. xxix + bb9 pp. Obituary notice of David Starr Jordan. l. Mammal.. 12(4):445. Obituary notice of James Williams Gidley. 445-46. . ~ , J. Mammal., 12~4~: Report of researches by Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleontological Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 30, p. 450. lg32 A Miocene long-beaked porpoise from California. Smithson. Misc. Collect., 87~2~:1-11.

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 181 Notes on the spadefoot of the western plains (Scaphiopus ham- mond iiJ. Copeia, no. 1, p. 36. Mexican tailless amphibians in the United States National Museum. U.S. Natl. Mus., Bull. 160. iv + 224 pp. New names for mammals proposed by Borowski in 1780 and 1781. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 45:147-48. Researches by Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. Car- negie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 31, p. 330. 1933 The last phase in the history of whaling. _ . ~ . (committee Print, 73d Confer. 2d sees.. on. 57-66. U.S. Congress, Senate ~ ' 7 1 1 Protective measures needed to perpetuate the supply of whales off the coasts of North America, as recommended by the Committee on Marine Mammals. U.S. Congress, Senate Committee Print, 73d Congr., Id sees., pp. 67-68. Obituary notice of Barton Warren Evermann. 394. I Mammal., 14~4) Researches by Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 32, pp. 328-29. 1934 With Earl L. Packard. A new cetothere from the Miocene Astoria formation of Newport, Oregon. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Palaeontol. Publ. 447, pp. 1-62. The Patagonian fossil whalebone whale, Cetotherium moreni (`Ly- dekker). Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Palaeontol. Publ. 447, pp.63-81. A new cetothere from the Modelo formation at Los Angeles, Cali- fornia. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Palaeontol. Publ. 447, pp. 83-104. Description of periotic bones of Schizodelphis bobengi. In: A Specimen of a Long-Nosed Dolphin from the Bone Valley Gravels of Polk County, Florida, by E. C. Case, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 1 05-11 3. Ann Arbor, University of Michigan, Museum of Palaeontology Contributions.

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182 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS The search for extinct marine mammals in Maryland. Smithson. Inst. Explor. Field-Work, 1933, Publ. 3235, pp. 15-17. Researches of Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. Car- negie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 33, p. 311. 1935 Savage, Thomas Staughton (1804-1880~. In: Dictionary of Ameri- can B iography, vol. 16, pp. 391-92. Researches of Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by John C. Merriam and associates. Car- negie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 34, p. 316. 1936 Henry Fairfield Osborn. (Obituary note) i. Mammal., 17~1~:84. Sigurd Risting. (Obituary note) J. Mammal., 17~1):84. Mammals from a native village site on Kodiak Island. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 49:37-38. The whaling treaty act. U.S. Congress, House of Representatives, Committee on Foreign Affairs, Hearings on S.3413. 74th Congr., 1st sees., Feb. 11, 18, 25, March 3, 7, and 10, 1936. 160 pp. Researches of Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by. J. C. Merriam and associates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 35, p. 321. A review of the Archaeoceti. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 482. xv + 366 pp. 1937 Comments on whale vertebra from Escalante Point. In: Gold- Bearine Deposits on the West Coast of Vancouver Island be- With others tween Esperanza Inlet and Alberni Canal, by M. F. Bancroft, Canada Geological Survey Memorandum 204, no. 2432. 34 pp. International Agreement for the Regulation of Whal- ing. With Final Act of the Conference. Misc. no. 4, London, His Majesty's Stationery Office, June 8, 1937. Cmd. 5487, 12 pp.; also in Confidential Document, U.S. Congress, Senate, 75th Congr., 1st sees., Executive U. pp. 6-14, July 31, 1937; U.S. Con- gress, Senate, Congressional Record, 75th Congr., 1st sess, August 5,81~150~:10672, 10674.

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 183 With Herschel V. Johnson. Report of the delegates of the United States to the International Whaling Conference, London, May immune 8. Confidential Document, U.S. Congress, Senate, 75th Congr., 1st sees., Executive U. July 31, pp. 14-19. Annotated list of West Virginia mammals. Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus., 84~3022~:443-79. Researches of Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by I. C. Merriam and associates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 36, pp. 339-40. 1938 With others. Regulation of whaling. Agreement between the United States of America and other powers, and final act of the conference. Department of State, Treaty Series no. 933, pp. 1-12. With A. S. Pearse. Mammalia from Yucatan caves. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 491, pp. 301~. With others. Protocol amending the International Agreement of June 8, 1937, for the Regulation of Whaling. With Final Act of the Conference, London, June 24. Misc. no. 6, London, His Majesty's Stationery Office, June 24, 1938. Cmd. 5827. 13 pp. Adaptation of structure to function in whales. In: Cooperation in Research. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 501, pp. 649-82. Researches of Remington Kellogg. In: Continuation of Paleonto- logical Researches, by J. C. Merriam and associates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 37, pp. 352-53. 1939 Annotated list of Tennessee mammals. Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus., 86(305 1): 245-303. Report of the delegates of the United States to the International Whaling Conference, London, June 1~24, Protocol, and Final Act. Executive Report no. 1, U.S. Congress, Senate, 76th Congr., 1st sees., Feb. 23. 27 pp. With others. Regulation of whaling. Protocol between the United States of America and other powers amending the International Agreement for the Regulation of Whaling signed in London June 8, 1937 (Treaty Series no. 933), with certificate of extension

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184 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS and Final Act of Conference. Department of State, Treaty Series, no. 944, pp. 1-14. A new red-backed mouse from Kentucky and Virginia. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 52:37-39. Cetacean studies in Europe. Smithson. Inst. Explor. Field-Work, Publ. 3525, pp. 41~6. With E. A. Goldman. The status of the name Dorcephalus crook) Mearns. J. Mammal., 20~4~:507. Studies on the history and evolution of whales. Wash. Year Book no. 38, pp. 311-12. Carnegie Inst. 1940 Whales, giants of the sea. National Geographic Magazine, 77~1~: 35-90. With E. A. Goldman. Ten new white-tailed deer from North and Middle America. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 53:81-89. Studies on the history and evolution of whales. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 39, pp. 294-95. 1941 On the cetotheres figured by Vandelli. Museu de Mineralogia e Geologia da Universidade de Lisboa, Bolletim, Ser. 3a, nos. 7-8, pp. 3-12. On the identity of the porpoise Sagmatias amblodon. Field Mu- seum of Natural History, Zoology Series Publ. 511, vol. 27, pp. 293-311. Palaeontology, early man, and historical geology. In: Report of John C. Merriam. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book no. 40, pp. 316-33. 1943 Notes and measurements of the skull. In: A Second Specimen of True's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon mirus True, from North Carolina, by H. H. Brimley. l. Mammal., 24~2~: 200-203. Tertiary, Quaternary, and Recent marine mammals of South Amer- ica and the West Indies. Proceedings, Eighth American Scientific Congress, Washington, 3:445-73.

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 185 Past and present status of the marine mammals of South America and the West Indies. Smithson. Inst. Ann. Rep., 1943, Publ. 3719, pp. 299-316. 1944 Mammals. In: A Field Collector's Manual in Natural History, prepared by members of the staff of the Smithsonian Institution, Publ. 3766. iv + 118 pp. With Lloyd V. Steere. Report of the delegation of the United States to the International Whaling Conference held at London, January 4, 13, 19 and 31, 1944. Confidential Document, U.S. Congress, Senate, 78th Congr., 2d sees., Executive D, pp. 11-17. Made public June 8, 1944. A new macaque from an island off the east coast of Borneo. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 57:75-76. With E. A. Goldman. Review of the spider monkeys. Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus., 96: 1-45. Fossil cetaceans from the Florida Tertiary. Comp. Zool. Bull., 94~9~:433-71. 1945 Harv. Univ. Mus. Macaques. In: Primate Malaria, ed. by S. D. Aberle. Once of Medical Information, Division of Medical Sciences, National Research Council. Washington, D.C., National Academy of Sciences. iii + 171 pp. Two rats from Morotai Island. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 58:65-68. A new Australian naked-tailed rat (Melomys). Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 58: 69-71. Two new Philippine rodents. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 58: 121-24. 1946 Three new mammals from the Pearl Islands, Panama. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 59: 57-62. Problems related to marine animals. In: A Program of Desirable Scientific Investigations in Arctic North America, ed. by R. F. Flint, pp. 43-44. Montreal, Arctic Institute of North America.

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186 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS Mammals of San lose Island, Bay of Panama. Smithson. Inst. Misc. Collect. 10647~: 1-4. With Ira N. Gabrielson. Report of the delegation of the United States to the International Whaling Conference, held at London, November 20, 21, 22, 23, and 26, 1945. U.S. Congress, Senate, 79th Congr., Ed sees., Executive I, pp. 13-16; also in Executive Report no. 9, pp. 15-18. A century of progress in Smithsonian biology. Science, 104:132~1. 1947 With Ira N. Gabrielson and William E. S. Flory. Report of the delegation of else United States to the International Whaling Commission held at Washington, D.C., November 20 through December 2, 1946. U.S. Congress, Senate, 80th Confer.. 1st sees.. Executive I, April 8, 1947, pp. 28-35. With Victor B. Scheffer. the Oregon Coast. O ~ , ~ (, , Occurrence of Stenella euphrosyne off Murrelet, 28~1):9-10. With A. Wetmore. A preliminary list of the mammals of the Shen- andoah National Park. U.S. National Park Service (mimeo- graphed circular), 6 pp. Scientists and deep sea resources. Magazine, 46~8~:6-8. University of Kansas, Graduate International commission for the establishment of an International Hylean Amazon Institute. U.S. Department of State Bulletin, 17~436~:891-92. 1949 Regulation of whaling. U.S. Congress, Senate, Subcommittee of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, Hearings on S.2080. 81st Congr., 1st sees., July 20, 1949, pp. 32~0. 1955 With Gerrit S. Miller, Jr. List of North American Recent mam- mals. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 205, pp. xii-954. Three Miocene porpoises from the Calvert Cliffs, Maryland. I. Lophocetus paptus, new species. II. Pelodelphis gracilis, new genus, new species. III. Identity of Tretosphys gabbii (Cope). Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus., 105: 101-54.

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 1956 187 The International Whaling Commission. Papers presented at the International Technical Conference on the Conservation of the Living Resources of the Sea, Rome, 18 April to 10 May 1955. United Nations Publication, Sales no. 1956. II.B.1., pp. 256-61. What and where are the whitetails? In: The Deer of North Amer- ica. The White-Tailed, Mule and Black-Tailed Deer, Genus Odocoileus, Their History and Management, ed. by Walter P. Taylor, pp. 31-55. The Stackpole Co. and Wildlife Manage- ment Institute. Table I: Distribution and supposed age relationships of New Zea- land cetaceans. In: Provisional Correlation of Selected Cenozoic Sequences in the Western and Central Pacific, by Preston E. Cloud, Jr. Proceedings, Eigl~th Pacific Science Congress, 2:555-76. lg57 With Frank C. Whitmore, fir. Marine mammals. In: Treatise on Marine Ecology and Paleoecology, ed. by Joel W. Hedgpeth. Geol. Soc. Am., Mem. 67, 1:1223-25. With Frank C. Whitmore, fir. Mammals. In: Treatise on Marine Ecology and Paleoecology, ed. by Joel W. Hedgpeth. Geol. Soc. Am., Mem. 67, 2: 1021-24. Two additional Miocene porpoises from the Calvert Cliffs, Ma~-y- land. Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus., 107: 279-337. 1959 Description of the skull of Pomatodelphis inaequalis Allen. Harv. Univ. Mus. Comp. Zool. Bull., 1 2 1 ~ 1 ): 3-26. Introduction. Symposium, Systematics, Present and Future, Society of Systematic Zoologists, Washington, December 29, 1958. Sys- tematic Zoology, 8~2) :59. 1960 Mammals and how they live. In: Wild Animals of North America, ed. by A. Severy, chap. 1, pp. 13-35. Washington, D.C., Na- tional Geographic Society.

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188 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS The rise of modern mammals. In: Wild Animals of North Amer- ica, ed. by A. Severy, chap. 2, pp. 37-51. Washington, D.C., National Geographic Society. Whales, giants of the sea. In: Wild Animals of North America, ed. by A. Severy, chap. 28, pp. 366-93. Washington, D.C., National Geographic Society. 1961 Antarctic whales. In: Science in Antarctica. Part 1: The Life Sci- ences in Antarctica, chap. 14, pp. 115-28. Washington, D.C., National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council. 1965 Fossil marine mammals from the Miocene Calvert formation of Maryland and Virginia. Part 1. A new whalebone whale from the Miocene Calvert formation. U.S. Natl. NIus. Bull. 247, pp. 1-45. Fossil marine mammals from the Miocene Calvert Formation of Maryland and Virginia. Part 2. The Miocene Calvert sperm whale Orycterocetus. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 47-63. 1966 Fossil marine mammals from the Miocene Calvert formation of Maryland and Virginia. Part 3. New species of extinct Mio- cene Sirenia. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 65-98. Fossil marine mammals from Miocene Calvert formation of Mary- land and Virginia. Part 4. A new odontocete from the Calvert formation of Maryland. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 99-101. 1968 Fossil marine mammals from Miocene Calvert formation of Mary- land and Virginia. Part 5. Miocene Calvert mysticetes de- scribed by Cope. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 103-32. Fossil marine mammals from Miocene Calvert formation of Mary- land and Virginia. Part 6. A hitherto unrecognized Calvert cetothere. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 133-61. Fossil marine mammals from Miocene Calvert formation of Mary- land and Virginia. Part 7. A sharp-nosed cetothere from the Miocene Calvert. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 163-73.

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REMINGTON KELLOGG 189 Fossil marine mammals from Miocene Calvert formation of Mary- land and Virginia. Part 8. Supplement to description of Parietobalaena palmer). U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 247, pp. 175-97. lg69 Cetothere skeletons from the Miocene Choptank formation of Mary- land and Virginia. U.S. Natl. Mus. Bull. 294, pp. 1-40.