Federal Facilities Beyond the 1990s

Ensuring Quality in an Era of Limited Resources

Summary of a Symposium

Federal Facilities Council

Standing Committee on Design and Construction

Standing Committee on Organization and Administration

Technical Report #133

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, DC
1997



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--> Federal Facilities Beyond the 1990s Ensuring Quality in an Era of Limited Resources Summary of a Symposium Federal Facilities Council Standing Committee on Design and Construction Standing Committee on Organization and Administration Technical Report #133 NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, DC 1997

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--> NOTICE The Federal Facilities Council (FFC) (formerly the Federal Construction Council) is a continuing activity of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) of the National Research Council (NRC). The purpose of the FFC is to promote continuing cooperation among the sponsoring federal agencies and between the agencies and other elements of the building community in order to advance building science and technology-particularly with regard to the design, construction, acquisition, evaluation, and operation of federal facilities. Currently, the following agencies sponsor the FFC: Department of the Air Force, Office of the Civil Engineer Department of the Air Force, Air National Guard Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Department of Energy, Office of Associate Deputy Secretary of Field Management Department of the Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Department of State, Office of Foreign Buildings Operations Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Facilities Management Food and Drug Administration General Services Administration, Public Buildings Service Indian Health Service National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Facilities Engineering Division National Institutes of Health National Institute of Standards and Technology, Building and Fire Research Laboratory National Endowment for the Arts, Design Arts Program National Science Foundation Smithsonian Institution, Office of Facilities Services U.S. Information Agency, International Broadcasting Bureau U.S. Public Health Service, Office of Management U.S. Postal Service, Facilities Department As part of its activities, the FFC periodically publishes reports that have been prepared by committees of government employees. Since these committees are not appointed by the NRC, they do not make recommendations, and their reports are considered FFC publications rather than NRC publications. For further information on the FFC program or FFC reports, please write to: Director, Federal Facilities Council, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20418 or visit us on the Internet @ http://www2.nas.edu/ffc.

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--> FEDERAL FACILITIES COUNCIL STANDING COMMITTEES ON DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION AND ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION STANDING COMMITTEE ON DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION Chairman Daniel Hightower, Division of Engineering Services, National Institutes of Health Vice Chairman Terrel Emmons, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Department of the Navy Members Plaban Bagchi, Technical Support Branch, U.S. Department of State James Biasco, Division of Facilities Planning and Construction, Indian Health Service Ed Feiner, Public Buildings Service, General Services Administration Stephan Freese, Facilities Division, Air National Guard D. S. Gim, Engineering Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Thomas Grooms, Office of Design and Construction, General Services Administration Stephen Hagan, Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology Kevin Kelly, Office of Design and Construction, General Services Administration

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--> Sheryl Kolasinski, Office of Design and Construction, Smithsonian Institution Benjamin Lawless, Facilities Division, Air National Guard Al Lew, Facilities Division, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Richard Millard, Facilities Division, Air National Guard William Miner, Office of Foreign Buildings Operations, U.S. Department of State G. Ray Navidi, Engineering Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Martin Newdorf, Facilities Support Division, U.S. Department of Energy Vincent Nowicki, Engineering Design Division, International Broadcasting Bureau Leo Phelan, Office of Facilities Management, Department of Veterans Affairs William Quinn, Experimental Engineering Division, U.S. Army Cold Region Research and Engineering Laboratory Antonio Regojo, Facilities Division, U.S. Postal Service David Reynolds, Military Construction, Department of the Air Force Douglas Rowand, Air National Guard Readiness Center John Scalzi, Structures and Building Systems, National Science Foundation Lloyd Siegel, Facilities Quality Office, Department of Veterans Affairs Gordon Wilcox, Office of Engineering Services, Public Health Service Terry Witford, Division of Civil Engineering, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Robert Wilson, Maintenance and Repair Division, International Broadcasting Bureau Program Committee Liaison Member James Binkley, Major Facilities Office, U.S. Postal Service Nongovernment Liaisons Jeffrey Beard, Design Build Institute of America Stuart Binstock, American Institute of Architects Michael Charles, American Society of Civil Engineers Earl Kennett, National Institute of Building Sciences Nickolas Kolesnikoff, Associated General Contractors of America Susan Loomis, Associated General Contractors of America Charles McGinnis, Construction Industry Institute

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--> Christopher Monek, Associated General Contractors of America Todd Phillips, American Institute of Architects James Pierce, National Society of Professional Engineers STANDING COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION Chairman William May, Advanced Broadcasting Technologies, International Broadcasting Bureau Members Hallet Brazelton, Facilities Division, Air National Guard Robert Bowen, Office of Facilities Management, Department of Veterans Affairs Tony Clifford, Division of Engineering Services, National Institutes of Health Jon Erikson, Network Engineering, International Broadcasting Bureau George Everhart, Public Buildings Service, General Services Administration Tom Hodges, Office of Foreign Buildings Operations, U.S. Department of State William Lowe, Special Projects, Indian Health Service William Morrison, Facilities Division, Air National Guard Mark Prahl, Implementation Division, International Broadcasting Bureau Rose Quicker, Facilities Management Division, Department of Veterans Affairs Richard Rothblum, Office of Foreign Buildings Operations, U.S. Department of State John Scalzi, Structures and Building Systems, National Science Foundation William Stareper, Facilities Division, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dianne Walters, Public Buildings Service, General Services Administration Raymond Willcocks, Engineering Division, Air National Guard

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--> Program Committee Liaison Member Robert Neary, Office of Facilities Management, Department of Veterans Affairs Staff Lynda Stanley, Director, Federal Facilities Council Lena Grayson, Project Assistant

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--> Preface Today, as never before, federal facility managers are being challenged to satisfy their agencies' needs for quality facilities with limited resources. New policy directions and attrition have resulted in substantially reduced funds and staff, the consolidation and reorganization of functions within and among agencies, and an increased reliance on outside contractors to design and construct facilities. As agencies downsize, "right-size," and reinvent themselves, facility managers must find new ways to provide and maintain quality facilities, so that the missions of their agencies can be met. Our two committees of the Federal Facilities Council (FFC) had been watching these developments for some time. We were both concerned that facilities managers adapt to the new environment in ways that sustain the quality of federal facilities. Learning of each other's interest, the FFC standing Committees on Design and Construction, and Organization and Administration decided to pool talents and efforts, to sponsor a symposium on ensuring quality facilities in this era of limited resources. In keeping with the missions of both standing committees, the symposium covered a broad range of facilities-related issues, including design and construction, project delivery, operations and maintenance, management, and customers. Therefore, we defined quality in several ways. Quality in new construction means a facility is built on time and within budget and satisfies the customer. With respect to maintenance, quality means a product or service that provides value to a facility, and whose cost is not disproportionately high, and which is provided on time.

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--> For the customer—both federal employees and the general public—quality means an environment in which they can achieve their intended purpose efficiently, safely, and comfortably. The symposium, entitled "Federal Facilities Beyond the 1990s: Ensuring Quality in an Era of Limited Resources," was held May 30–31, 1996, at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. Representatives from federal government, private corporations, and academia described their experiences in reengineering their organizations and business practices to maintain or improve the quality of their facilities despite fewer resources. The speakers were selected above all for their successful innovations. We wanted the symposium to provide an opportunity for the facilities management community to learn of practical approaches and achievements, as well as to sharpen their understanding of the current environment and provide their own views about the issues they face. This report includes papers based on many of the presentations made at the symposium. We hope that you will find the ideas here as stimulating as we did. DANIEL HIGHTOWER, CHAIR, COMMITTEE ON DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION WILLIAM MAY, CHAIR, COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

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--> Content     Executive Summary:   1     Maintaining Quality In An Era Of Reduced Resources   11     Key Facility Implications And Results of Business Reengineering: The Private Sector Experience and an Outlook for the Future   17     Organization Transformation: A Case Study   32     Reengineering Business Practices: A University's Experience Outsourcing Facility Management Services   41     Reinventing The Bureau of Reclamation   50     Technologies For Effective Facility Management   55     Federal Acquisition Reform: A Status Report and Outlook for the Future   66     Design-Build: Not Necessarily What You Thought It Was   76     Alternative Methods For Delivering Facilities At The U.S. Postal Service   84     Ensuring Quality In Buildings Despite Fewer Resources   92     Achieving Outstanding Design Efficiently   96     The Charrette Process: A Tool For Achieving Design Excellence   103

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-->     Building Performance: Improving The Facility Lifecycle   111     Putting It All Together: Case Study Of The HCFA Headquarters   115     The Stewardship Of Facilities   135     Effective Approaches To Facility Stewardship And Management   140     Techniques For Cost And Quality Control: Initiatives At The Department of Veterans Affairs   144     Facilities Managers: Communicating Your Value To Your Customers   150     Speaker Biographies   157