Appendix C
Biographical Information

Steven E. Koonin (Chair) is vice president and provost and a professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology. His areas of expertise include theoretical nuclear physics and computational physics; current research interests include nuclear structure and reaction models and quantum computing. He has served as a consultant for various national laboratories, including Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge. He chaired the National Research Council's (NRC's) 1990 review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, served on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Inertial Confinement Fusion Advisory Committee (ICFAC), and participated in a review of Science Based Stockpile Stewardship as part of the JASON group. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

W. David Arnett is a Regents' Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Arizona. His research interests include nuclear, relativistic, and computational astrophysics. His previous positions include terms at the University of Chicago and as a Distinguished Professor at the Enrico Fermi Institute. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and is a member of the International Astronomical Union and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has recently participated in experiments using the NOVA laser facility at Lawrence Livermore. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Robert L. Byer is a professor of applied physics and director of the Center for Nonlinear Optical Materials at Stanford University. He previously served as Stanford's dean of engineering. His research expertise includes diode-pumped solid-state lasers, nonlinear optics, nonlinear materials, and laser remote sensing. He serves on the Director's Advisory Committee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has consulted for its laser directorate. He served as a consultant to the ICFAC in its review of the National Ignition Facility laser design. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Optical Society of America, and the American Physical Society, and is past president of the IEEE Lasers and Electrooptics Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Robert W. Conn is dean of engineering and Walter J. Zable Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of California, San Diego. His experience in fusion physics and engineering, and in plasma and materials technology, includes specific expertise in the dynamics of fusion burning plasmas, the interaction of plasma with material surfaces, and fusion reactor design. He has served on numerous DOE magnetic fusion advisory committees, as well as on the NRC's 1990 review of ICF. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Ronald C. Davidson is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University. He headed the university's Physics Laboratory from 1991 through 1996. His previous positions include that of assistant director for applied plasma physics in the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and 10 years as director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center. His research interests include plasma turbulence, nonlinear plasma theory, nonneutral plasmas, and intense charged particle beams. He has served on numerous national and international review committees, including the 1986 and 1990 NRC reviews of the ICF program, and on the DOE ICFAC. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society.



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Review of the Department of Energy's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program: The National Ignition Facility Appendix C Biographical Information Steven E. Koonin (Chair) is vice president and provost and a professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology. His areas of expertise include theoretical nuclear physics and computational physics; current research interests include nuclear structure and reaction models and quantum computing. He has served as a consultant for various national laboratories, including Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge. He chaired the National Research Council's (NRC's) 1990 review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, served on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Inertial Confinement Fusion Advisory Committee (ICFAC), and participated in a review of Science Based Stockpile Stewardship as part of the JASON group. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. W. David Arnett is a Regents' Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Arizona. His research interests include nuclear, relativistic, and computational astrophysics. His previous positions include terms at the University of Chicago and as a Distinguished Professor at the Enrico Fermi Institute. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and is a member of the International Astronomical Union and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has recently participated in experiments using the NOVA laser facility at Lawrence Livermore. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Robert L. Byer is a professor of applied physics and director of the Center for Nonlinear Optical Materials at Stanford University. He previously served as Stanford's dean of engineering. His research expertise includes diode-pumped solid-state lasers, nonlinear optics, nonlinear materials, and laser remote sensing. He serves on the Director's Advisory Committee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has consulted for its laser directorate. He served as a consultant to the ICFAC in its review of the National Ignition Facility laser design. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Optical Society of America, and the American Physical Society, and is past president of the IEEE Lasers and Electrooptics Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Robert W. Conn is dean of engineering and Walter J. Zable Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of California, San Diego. His experience in fusion physics and engineering, and in plasma and materials technology, includes specific expertise in the dynamics of fusion burning plasmas, the interaction of plasma with material surfaces, and fusion reactor design. He has served on numerous DOE magnetic fusion advisory committees, as well as on the NRC's 1990 review of ICF. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Ronald C. Davidson is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University. He headed the university's Physics Laboratory from 1991 through 1996. His previous positions include that of assistant director for applied plasma physics in the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and 10 years as director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center. His research interests include plasma turbulence, nonlinear plasma theory, nonneutral plasmas, and intense charged particle beams. He has served on numerous national and international review committees, including the 1986 and 1990 NRC reviews of the ICF program, and on the DOE ICFAC. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society.

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Review of the Department of Energy's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program: The National Ignition Facility Anthony J. DeMaria is chairman and president of DcMaria Electrooptics Systems, Inc. and a research professor at the University of Connecticut Photonics Research Center. His previous experience includes the positions of assistant director of research for electronics and photonic technologies, and acting assistant director of research for information systems and technology, at United Technologies. His expertise in applied and laser physics includes experience in utilization of laser devices, interaction of elastic waves with coherent light radiation, gas laser research and applications, and acoustic-and electrooptics. He served on the 1990 NRC review of the ICF program, and on the DOE ICFAC. He is a fellow of the IEEE, and past editor of the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, a fellow and past president of the Optical Society of America, and a fellow of the American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Paul E. Dimotakis is the John K. Northrop Professor of Aeronautics and a professor of applied physics at the California Institute of Technology. His research focuses on investigations of turbulent-flow phenomena, with an emphasis on turbulent transport and mixing in liquid-and gas-phase, chemically reacting as well as nonreacting flows, and combustion. He has consulted for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the area of turbulence and turbulent mixing and has participated in experiments at the NOVA laser facility at Lawrence Livermore. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Jack J. Dongarra holds a joint appointment as Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of Tennessee and as Distinguished Scientist in the Mathematical Sciences Section at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He was formerly the scientific director of the Advanced Computational Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. His expertise includes numerical algorithms in linear algebra, parallel computing, use of advanced computer architectures, programming methodology, tools for parallel computers, and high-quality mathematical software. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Roger W. Falcone is professor and chair of the Department of Physics at the University of California at Berkeley. His recent research includes topics in laser interaction with solids, gases, and plasmas; atomic physics; and x-ray scattering. Dr. Falcone has served on numerous scientific advisory committees, including several for the National Science Foundation involving a science and technology center, the LIGO project at MIT and Caltech, and a visiting committee at NSF; a review committee for the Max Planck Institute in Garching; and advisory committees for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has served on numerous national and international advisory committees for scientific societies. Throughout his career he has consulted for several laser and electrooptics companies and has consulted with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the areas of laser interaction with matter and other areas of physics in the laser and physics divisions. He has received partial support from DOE for several research projects at Berkeley through LLNL. He is a recipient of an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award and is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America. Hermann A. Grunder is the director of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the DOE's newest laboratory for nuclear physics research in Newport News, Virginia. Before coming to Jefferson Laboratory in May 1985, he served as deputy director of general sciences at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Experienced in the design, construction, and operation of accelerators and neutral beam injectors, Dr. Grunder has also managed large facilities through construction and operations. Dr. Grunder is a fellow of the American Physical Society, is division councilor of the Division of Physics of Beams, and has served on a number of professional and review committees such as the DOE Joint Coordinating Committee on the Fundamental Properties of Matter, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Policy Committee, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Panel for Radiation Research. Henry W. Kendall is the J.A. Stratton Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is recognized for his research in high-energy physics, including high-energy

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Review of the Department of Energy's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program: The National Ignition Facility experimental physics and nucleon structure. He is a founding member of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), an organization whose missions include advocacy of U.S. policies and international agreements that control nuclear weapons proliferation and lower the risk of nuclear war. He has served as chairman of the UCS since 1973. He has held various advisory positions, including service on the JASON group and on the Galvin Committee review of the DOE laboratories. He is an advisor to the World Bank and is the organizer and chairman of the bank's Panel on the Genetic Engineering of Crops. He is on the board of trustees of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution as well as of the National Religious Partnership for the Environment. He is the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the 1990 Nobel Prize for physics. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Arthur K. Kerman is a professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests in theoretical nuclear physics include nuclear QCD-relativistic heavy-ion physics, nuclear reactions, and laser accelerators. Over the course of 30 years, he has had various long-standing consulting relationships with Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge national laboratories, as well as with several private companies and the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST). He currently has active consulting relationships with LLNL and LANL. He has similarly served on numerous professional committees for DOE, the National Science Foundation, Stanford University, the University of California, and the White House. He currently serves on the Director's Advisory Committee of LLNL, the Physics and Space Technology Advisory Committee at LLNL, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Policy Committee at Brookhaven, the Physics Division Advisory Committee at LANL, and the Theory Advisory Committee at LANL. He was a member of the DOE ICFAC. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Steven A. Orszag is the Forrest G. Hamrick '31 Professor of Engineering and Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University. He is well recognized for his expertise in fluid dynamics and applied mathematics, and is co-author with Carl Bender of the widely used textbook Advanced Mathematical Methods for Scientists and Engineers. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the American Physical Society's Otto Laporte Award for fluid dynamics, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Fluid and Plasma Dynamics Award, and the G.I. Taylor Medal. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Marshall N. Rosenbluth is a professor of physics Emeritus at the University of California at San Diego. His research interest is the theoretical physics of plasmas. He was a nuclear weapons designer at Los Alamos National Laboratory early in his career (1950–1956). He consults primarily as a member of the Joint Central Team of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is funded by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (the ICF program is independent of DOE OFES), and also consults at General Atomics. His committee service includes membership on committees concerned with international security and arms control, such as the JASON group, and the National Research Council's Committee on International Security and Arms Control. He served on both the 1986 and 1990 NRC reviews of the ICF program, as well as on the DOE ICFAC. He is a winner of the Fermi Prize. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. George H. Trilling is Professor Emeritus at the University of California and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His expertise is in high-energy physics. He has served on numerous advisory groups, including the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel of the DOE and committees for Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratoryl Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Review of the Department of Energy's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program: The National Ignition Facility J. Pace VanDevender is the founder of Prosperity Institute, a firm dealing in the study and applications of human factors. He previously held positions at Sandia National Laboratories, where he headed the pulsed-power program from 1984 to 1993. His responsibilities in that position included pulsed-power research and development, inertial confinement fusion, nuclear weapons effects simulation, and directed energy weapon research and development. He is a member of the Naval Studies Board of the National Research Council and has served on the Carrier 21 Study, the Mine Warfare Study, and the study on implications of advancing technology for Navy warfare in the twenty-first century. In addition, he has been a member of numerous advisory boards, including the Advance Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the Compact Ignition Tokomak of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Directed Energy Advisory Board of the Strategic Defense Initiative, and the Defense Sciences Advisory Board of Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He was awarded the Department of Energy's Lawrence Award for Physics in 1991.