personal responsibility. The home environment emphasized the importance of reading and debate.

He attended public schools in Newton and Brookline, graduating with a spotty grade record marked by high grades from teachers he liked and low grades from those he disliked. One especially well-liked teacher, Tyler B. Kepner, demanded analytic thinking in the context of teaching United States history. It was Kepner's encouragement, and his high recommendation, that was critical to Dick's applying to college and matriculating at Brown.

Although his high school interests had tended more towards the humanities, Dick was drawn to economics and psychology at Brown, eventually completing a joint major. He carried out an undergraduate honors thesis directed by Joseph McV. Hunt, which earned him a summa cum laude degree in 1940. His eventual decision to focus on psychology was heavily influenced by the quality of the members of the Brown psychology department at that time, people such as Walter Hunter, Harold Schlosberg, Donald Lindsley, Carl Pfaffmann, and Lorrin Riggs.

Dick elected to remain at Brown for his graduate training, working in the laboratory of Harold Schlosberg. His graduate career was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served as a research psychologist in the Office of Scientific Research and Development. There he worked on perceptual-motor systems for the defensive weapons systems of the B-29 bomber. At the end of the war Dick returned to Brown where he received his Ph.D. in 1947.

In 1947 Dick took up an assistant professorship in social relations at Harvard. He remained at Harvard, becoming an associate professor in 1950 and a full professor in 1957. In 1960 he was recruited by Bob Bush to the newly emerging psychology department at the University of Pennsylvania. At Penn he became the first James M. Skinner Univer-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement