Background

Current Explosives Threat.

The most recently compiled bomb threat data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms7 and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)8 is shown in Table 1. The data for property damage and injuries in 1993 was significantly affected by the bombing of the World Trade Center in New York; the 1995 data was affected by the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. For example, the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993 caused $510 million in damage and resulted in 1042 persons injured—a significant portion of the 1993 data.

The most common materials used as ingredients in destructive devices in 1994 were reportedly flammable liquids (29%); various chemicals (26%); black powder (16%); photoflash/fireworks powders (16%); smokeless powder (9%); military explosives other than C-4 and TNT (1%); and dynamite/water gels, matchheads, blasting agents (including ammonium nitrate fuel oil, (ANFO)), and other fillers (2%). Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), although used in a few highly publicized bombings, is not a frequently used ingredient. Significant amounts of information are now available on the Internet, compounding the bombing threat.

TABLE 1 Historical Bomb Threat Data

Type of Incident

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Bombings

931

1551

1911

1880

1916

1562

Attempted bombings

254

395

384

375

522

417

Incendiary bombings

267

423

582

538

545

406

Attempted incendiary bombings

130

130

112

187

180

192

TOTAL

1582

2499

2989

2980

3163

2577

Reported killed

27

29

26

49

31

193

Reported injured

222

230

349

1323

308

744

Reported property damage

$9.6M

$6.4M

$12.5M

$518.0M

$7.5M

$105.1M

 

SOURCE: FBI Explosives Unit, Bomb Data Center. 1997. “1995 Bombing Incidents,” General Information Bulletin 97-1.

7  

Department of the Treasury, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. 1995. Arson and Explosives: Incidents Report 1994. ATF P 3320.4. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.

8  

FBI Explosives Unit, Bomb Data Center. 1997. “1995 Bombing Incidents,” General Information Bulletin 97-1.



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--> Background Current Explosives Threat. The most recently compiled bomb threat data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms7 and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)8 is shown in Table 1. The data for property damage and injuries in 1993 was significantly affected by the bombing of the World Trade Center in New York; the 1995 data was affected by the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. For example, the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993 caused $510 million in damage and resulted in 1042 persons injured—a significant portion of the 1993 data. The most common materials used as ingredients in destructive devices in 1994 were reportedly flammable liquids (29%); various chemicals (26%); black powder (16%); photoflash/fireworks powders (16%); smokeless powder (9%); military explosives other than C-4 and TNT (1%); and dynamite/water gels, matchheads, blasting agents (including ammonium nitrate fuel oil, (ANFO)), and other fillers (2%). Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), although used in a few highly publicized bombings, is not a frequently used ingredient. Significant amounts of information are now available on the Internet, compounding the bombing threat. TABLE 1 Historical Bomb Threat Data Type of Incident 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 Bombings 931 1551 1911 1880 1916 1562 Attempted bombings 254 395 384 375 522 417 Incendiary bombings 267 423 582 538 545 406 Attempted incendiary bombings 130 130 112 187 180 192 TOTAL 1582 2499 2989 2980 3163 2577 Reported killed 27 29 26 49 31 193 Reported injured 222 230 349 1323 308 744 Reported property damage $9.6M $6.4M $12.5M $518.0M $7.5M $105.1M   SOURCE: FBI Explosives Unit, Bomb Data Center. 1997. “1995 Bombing Incidents,” General Information Bulletin 97-1. 7   Department of the Treasury, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. 1995. Arson and Explosives: Incidents Report 1994. ATF P 3320.4. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 8   FBI Explosives Unit, Bomb Data Center. 1997. “1995 Bombing Incidents,” General Information Bulletin 97-1.