emergence suggested that the experience gained through various experiments in technology transfer and the management of intellectual property can, indeed, provide some guidance for those concerned with the management of intellectual property in research tools in molecular biology. Those themes are discussed in the final two sessions, which include a section on different perspectives represented by the workshop participants and a general summary of the workshop.

REFERENCES

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Henderson R, Jaffe AB, Trajtenberg M. 1994. Numbers up, quality down? Trends in university patenting 1965–1992. Paper presented at the CEPR/AAAS conference "University Goals, Institutional Mechanisms, and the 'Industrial Transferability' of Research."


Weiner C. 1989. Patenting and academic research: Historical case studies. In: Weil V and Snapper JW, editors. Owning Scientific and Technical Information. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.



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