TABLE 5.15 Observed Growth in Relative Employment Rates of Specific Cohorts of Immigrant Men (Difference Between Immigrant Men and Native Men in Percentage of the Population That Is Employed, by Age Group and Year of Arrival)

 

Year

Cohort/Age Group

1970

1980

1990

1960-64 arrivals

15-24 in 1970

0.2

0.4

25-34 in 1970

0.4

1.5

2.4

35-44 in 1970

0.9

3.2

12.0

45-54 in 1970

1.1

13.0

1965-69 arrivals

15-24 in 1970

-0.4

-1.4

25-34 in 1970

-5.4

1.0

2.4

35-44 in 1970

2.3

3.1

12.0

45-54 in 1970

-1.6

10.8

1970-74 arrivals

25-34 in 1980

-1.1

-0.2

35-44 in 1980

0.3

1.4

45-54 in 1980

1.6

13.1

1975-79 arrivals

15-24 in 1980

-11.4

0.7

25-34 in 1980

-7.8

0.4

35-44 in 1980

-7.8

11.8

1980-84 arrivals

25-34 in 1990

-1.2

35-44 in 1990

-2.1

45-54 in 1990

-2.0

1985-90 arrivals

25-34 in 1990

-9.6

35-44 in 1990

-9.3

45-54 in 1990

-9.0

—= cohort is outside 25-64 age range.

Source: Tabulations from the 1970, 1980, and 1990 Public Use Samples of the U.S. Census of Population. The statistics are calculated in the subsample of men aged 2564 years who did not reside in group quarters.

Since these tables have exactly the same format as those that tracked cohort-specific trends in wages, they can be used to examine both changes in employment across immigrant cohorts as well as career trajectories in relative employment rates of immigrants.23

23  

As was the case in examining relative wage growth by tracking cohorts over time, selective emigration may explain part of this convergence of employment rates.



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