TABLE 2.7 Marital Status of Immigrant Admissions, 1995 and U.S. Population, 1990 by Age Group (percentage)

 

Men

Women

Age Group and Marital Status

Immigrants

U.S. Population

Immigrants

U.S. Population

25-34

Never married

34.8

36.1

18.8

25.0

Married

63.9

54.0

79.7

60.8

Widowed

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.6

Divorced

1.0

7.3

1.1

9.8

Separated

0.2

2.5

0.2

3.8

35-44

Never married

14.5

13.4

10.2

10.0

Married

82.4

71.1

85.4

69.1

Widowed

0.2

0.4

0.8

1.6

Divorced

2.5

12.1

3.2

15.4

Separated

0.4

2.9

0.4

3.9

45-54

Never married

5.7

6.8

7.7

5.6

Married

90.3

77.4

82.5

70.3

Widowed

0.6

1.1

4.0

5.2

Divorced

3.1

12.1

5.3

15.7

Separated

0.4

2.7

0.5

3.3

55-64

Never married

3.7

4.8

7.5

4.5

Married

90.9

69.0

72.0

66.3

Widowed

2.3

12.5

15.1

15.9

Divorced

2.8

7.5

4.9

11.0

Separated

0.4

6.2

0.5

2.2

65 and older

Never married

3.7

4.8

9.5

5.5

Married

84.3

73.1

46.1

38.6

Widowed

9.7

13.9

40.5

49.4

Divorced

1.8

4.7

3.6

5.5

Separated

0.4

3.5

0.2

1.0

 

Sources: U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (1997:Table 14); and U.S. Bureau of the Census (1993:Population Characteristics, Table 34).

Finally, immigrant women have more children than the average resident of the United States, another contributor to differences in family and household size (see Table 2.9). As we discuss in the next chapter, the greater rates of childbearing among immigrant women are an important factor in the effect of immigration on American society.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement