Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

P. Suresh Rao, chair, is a graduate research professor in the Soil and Water Science Department of the University of Florida. His research interests include the development and field testing of process-level models for predicting the fate of pollutants in soils and ground water. He also has worked extensively on the field testing of innovative in situ flushing technologies for site remediation. He has worked with state and federal agencies in providing scientific bases for environmental regulatory policy. Dr. Rao is a former WSTB member and member of the WSTB's Committee on Ground Water Vulnerability Assessment and Committee on Ground Water Modeling Assessment. He received a Ph.D. in soil physics from the University of Hawaii.

Richard Brown, vice-chair, is vice-president of remediation technology for Fluor Daniel GTI. His responsibilities include the development and implementation of remediation technologies such as bioremediation, soil vapor extraction, and air sparging. Before joining Fluor Daniel GTI, Dr. Brown was director of business development for Cambridge Analytical Associates' Bioremediation Systems Division and technology manager for FMC Corporation's Aquifer Remediation Systems. Dr. Brown holds patents on applications of bioreclamation technology, on the use of hydrogen peroxide in bioreclamation, and on an improved nutrient formulation for the biological treatment of hazardous wastes. He was a member of the WSTB's Committee on In Situ Bioremediation. Dr. Brown received a B.A. in chemistry from Harvard and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Cornell University.



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Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup: From Concept to Commercialization Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS P. Suresh Rao, chair, is a graduate research professor in the Soil and Water Science Department of the University of Florida. His research interests include the development and field testing of process-level models for predicting the fate of pollutants in soils and ground water. He also has worked extensively on the field testing of innovative in situ flushing technologies for site remediation. He has worked with state and federal agencies in providing scientific bases for environmental regulatory policy. Dr. Rao is a former WSTB member and member of the WSTB's Committee on Ground Water Vulnerability Assessment and Committee on Ground Water Modeling Assessment. He received a Ph.D. in soil physics from the University of Hawaii. Richard Brown, vice-chair, is vice-president of remediation technology for Fluor Daniel GTI. His responsibilities include the development and implementation of remediation technologies such as bioremediation, soil vapor extraction, and air sparging. Before joining Fluor Daniel GTI, Dr. Brown was director of business development for Cambridge Analytical Associates' Bioremediation Systems Division and technology manager for FMC Corporation's Aquifer Remediation Systems. Dr. Brown holds patents on applications of bioreclamation technology, on the use of hydrogen peroxide in bioreclamation, and on an improved nutrient formulation for the biological treatment of hazardous wastes. He was a member of the WSTB's Committee on In Situ Bioremediation. Dr. Brown received a B.A. in chemistry from Harvard and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Cornell University.

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Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup: From Concept to Commercialization Richelle Allen-King is an assistant professor in the Department of Geology at Washington State University, where she teaches courses in ground water and contaminant fate and transport. Her research focuses on the biogeochemistry of contaminants in the subsurface environment. She is currently a member of the science advisory board for Washington State's environmental regulatory agency. She received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and a Ph.D. in earth sciences (hydrogeology) from the University of Waterloo. William Cooper is chair of the Department of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Previously, he was director of the Drinking Water Research Center at Florida International University. His current research focuses on high-energy electron beam irradiation of contaminated water, a process tested under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program. Dr. Cooper is an environmental chemist, with a Ph.D. in marine and atmospheric chemistry from the University of Miami. Wilford Gardner, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, recently retired as dean of the College of Natural Resources at the University of California, Berkeley. His research has focused on movement of fluids in porous media, soil physics, soil moisture measurement, and environmental physics. He has been a National Science Foundation senior fellow at Cambridge University and a Fulbright Lecturer at the University of Ghent. He was a member of the WSTB's Committee on Irrigation-Induced Water Quality Problems and is currently a member of the WSTB. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Iowa State College. Michael Gollin is a partner at Spencer & Frank in Washington, D.C. He is a registered patent attorney with experience in environmental law and litigation. He has built an international practice helping clients to protect, enforce, defend, and market intellectual property, with an emphasis on biotechnology and environmental technology. He holds an A.B. in biochemical sciences from Princeton, an M.S. in zoology and molecular biology from the University of Zurich, and a J.D. from Boston University. Thomas Hellman is vice-president for environmental affairs at Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. During his career, he has managed environmental health and safety operations for a range of companies, including General Electric, Allied Chemical, and Union Carbide. He served on the WSTB's Committee on Ground Water Quality Protection and is currently a member of the WSTB. He received a B.A. in chemistry from Williams College and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Pennsylvania State University. Diane Heminway is the western New York coordinator for the Citizens' Environmental Coalition, a statewide coalition of 90 environmental, community, and

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Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup: From Concept to Commercialization labor organizations in New York State. Heminway became active in ground water cleanup issues as a result of a pesticide spill near her children's elementary school. She is very familiar with public concerns about the limitations of cleanup technologies and has been outspoken about the need for governments and companies to present citizens with complete information about the capabilities of technologies. She currently serves on the Water Management Advisory Committee and the Working Group of the Pesticide Management Advisory Board of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Richard Luthy is a professor in (and former head of) the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. In addition to academic responsibilities, he has consulted on a range of waste treatment and remediation issues for both the public and private-sectors. His research interests in environmental engineering include physicochemical processes for industrial waste reduction and treatment, remediation of contaminated soil using physicochemical and microbial processes, and applied aquatic chemistry. Dr. Luthy is a former president of the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors, and a past chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Environmental Sciences. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Roger Olsen is vice-president and senior geochemist for Camp Dresser & McKee. He is responsible for project management and technical supervision of geochemical and hazardous waste investigations. His experience includes design of sampling and analytical programs; evaluation of risks and impacts; evaluation of treatment and disposal options; implementation of quality control procedures; and design and engineering of hazardous waste disposal and remediation programs. He has expertise in the mobility, degradation, and transport of metals and organic compounds in soil water systems. He received a B.S. in mineral engineering chemistry and a Ph.D. in geochemistry from the Colorado School of Mines. Philip Palmer, a senior environmental fellow in the DuPont Chemicals Core Resources Section of the Corporate Remediation Group, has over 15 years of experience in the field of remediation technology development. He currently heads a group of 40 that is evaluating remediation technologies. Palmer oversees development and pilot testing of new technologies on DuPont sites and assessment of the company's remediation technology needs. Mr. Palmer served as a leader and member of the Chemical Manufacturers Association RCRA Regulations Task Force from the inception of RCRA until 1990. He is a former member of the National Research Council's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University. He holds an M.S. in environmental engineering from Drexel University.

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Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup: From Concept to Commercialization Frederick Pohland, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is Edward R. Weidlein Chair of Environmental Engineering and professor of civil engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests include water and waste chemistry and microbiology, solid and hazardous waste management, and environmental impact monitoring and assessment. He earned an M.S. in civil engineering and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Purdue University. Ann Rappaport is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University and director of the university's Hazardous Materials Management Program. Previously, she served as chief of policy and program development for the Division of Hazardous Waste, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Quality Engineering. She earned a B.A. in Asian and environmental studies from Wellesley, an M.S. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Tufts University. Martin Sara is principal hydrogeologist for RUST Environment & Infrastructure. His current responsibilities include conducting assessments of hazardous waste sites and managing monitoring programs for solid and hazardous waste landfills. He is active with the American Society for Testing of Materials (ASTM). He authored ASTM Standard D5092, ''Design and Installation of Ground-water Monitoring Wells in Aquifers." He currently chairs two ASTM committees: the Monitoring Wells Design and Construction committee and the Geochronology and Environmental Isotopes committee. Mr. Sara recently authored a text, "Standard Handbook for Solid and Hazardous Waste Facility Assessments," published by Lewis Publishers and used in the EPA's Superfund University Training Institute. He holds a B.S. in geology from the University of Illinois and an M.S. in geological sciences from the University of Southern California. Dag Syrrist is a partner with the venture capital firm Vision Capital in Boston, Massachusetts. Previously, he was manager of environmental operations and the principal industry liaison for the Environmental Finance Group at Technology Funding. His responsibilities included establishing the industry and government relationships necessary to implement Technology Funding's environmental investment strategies, including technology transfer, corporate alliances, and licensing. Mr. Syrrist also acted as Technology Funding's primary coordinator with the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Defense, and national laboratories. He has served on several federal, state, and regional advisory committees focusing on technology development, diffusion, and financing. Mr. Syrrist holds a B.A. in business administration from Lincoln University and an M.A. in international economics from San Francisco State University.

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Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup: From Concept to Commercialization Brian Wagner is a research hydrologist in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program. His research interests include data network design for environmental monitoring and assessment, experimental design for understanding contaminant fate and transport, and optimization techniques for water resources management. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from Drexel University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in applied hydrogeology from Stanford University. STAFF Jacqueline A. MacDonald is associate director of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She directed the studies that led to the reports Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup, In Situ Bioremediation: When Does It Work?, Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities, and Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology. She received the 1996 National Research Council Award for Distinguished Service. Ms. MacDonald earned an M.S. degree in environmental science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois, where she received a university graduate fellowship and Avery Brundage scholarship, and a B.A. degree magna cum laude in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College. Angela F. Brubaker is a research assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She prepared the report of the Committee on Innovative Remediation Technologies for publication and assisted with editing the final draft. She received a B.A. in liberal arts from Eastern Mennonite College in 1990. Ellen A. de Guzman is a project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She assisted in preparing the final draft of the report. She received a B.A. from the University of the Philippines.