Appendixes



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The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy Appendixes

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The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy This page in the original is blank.

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The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy Appendix A— Biographical Sketches of Committee Members JOHN P. HOLDREN (NAS member), chair, is Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, and professor of Environmental Science and Public Policy in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University. He is also a member of the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, Chair of the Executive Committee of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, Visiting Distinguished Scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center, and a consultant to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has written extensively on energy technology and policy, global environmental problems, and international security. JOHN D. STEINBRUNER, vice-chair of CISAC, is a senior fellow and former director of the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. He has held faculty positions at Yale, Harvard, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A political scientist, he has written extensively on arms control and security issues, including problems of command and control and crisis decision making. MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM F. BURNS (USA, ret.), chair of the nuclear weapons study, was the ninth director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and former deputy assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs. He served as the first U.S. Special Envoy to the denuclearization negotiations with states of the former Soviet Union under the Nunn-Lugar Act, and he negotiated the government-to-government agreement on HEU sales to the United

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The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy States of uranium from dismantled Soviet weapons. He is currently a distinguished fellow at the U.S. Army War College. GENERAL GEORGE LEE BUTLER (USAF, ret.) is former commander-in-chief of the Strategic Air Command and its successor, United States Strategic Command. Prior to assuming these positions, he served as director for Strategic Plans and Policy on the staff of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He played a leading role in adapting U.S. national military strategy and nuclear war planning to the post-Cold War era. He is now president of Kiewit Energy Group, with headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1996, he served as a member of the Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons. PAUL M. DOTY (NAS) is director emeritus of the Center for Science and International Affairs and professor emeritus of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Harvard University. He was a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee and has served as a consultant to various government agencies. He has been a leader in developing dialogues on security issues between Russian and American scientists. STEVE FETTER is an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs, University of Maryland. A physicist, he was a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy and a Council on Foreign Relations fellow at the U.S. Department of State. ALEXANDER H. FLAX (NAE) is president emeritus of the Institute for Defense Analyses and served as home secretary of the National Academy of Engineering. His field is aeronautical engineering. From 1964 to 1969 he was assistant secretary for research and development of the U.S. Department of the Air Force and has served on advisory boards of the U.S. Departments of Defense and Transportation. RICHARD L. GARWIN (NAS, NAE, IOM) is fellow emeritus of the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of the IBM Corporation. An experimental physicist, he has served as a consultant to the Los Alamos National Laboratory on nuclear weapons and to the U.S. government on topics of national security and arms control. He has been a member of the Defense Science Board and is the 1996 recipient of the R.V. Jones Intelligence Award. ROSE GOTTEMOELLER is deputy director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Previously she was director of Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian affairs at the National Security Council and a senior specialist on Soviet security policy for the RAND Corporation.

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The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy SPURGEON M. KEENY, JR. is president of the Arms Control Association. He served with the atomic energy division of the U.S. Department of Defense, as a senior staff member of the National Security Council, and with Arms Control Disarmament Agency as assistant director for science and technology (1969-1973) and as deputy director (1977-1981). He was head of the U.S. delegation to the Theater Nuclear Force Talks in 1980. JOSHUA LEDERBERG (NAS, IOM), chair of CISAC's Working Group on Biological Weapons Control, is university professor and past president of the Rockefeller University. In 1958 he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in bacterial genetics. He has been active in the work of the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health and was involved in National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mariner and Viking missions to Mars. He served as a consultant to Arms Control Disarmament Agency during the negotiation of the Biological Weapons Convention. MATTHEW MESELSON (NAS, IOM) is professor of molecular and cellular biology at Harvard University and codirector of the Harvard Sussex program on Chemical and Biological Warfare, Armament, and Arms Limitation. He has served as a consultant on chemical and biological weapons matters to U.S. government agencies. WOLFGANG K. H. PANOFSKY (NAS), chair emeritus, is professor and director emeritus at the Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University. He served as chair of CISAC plutonium study. His field is experimental high-energy physics. He was a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee under Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy and the General Advisory Committee on Arms Control to the President under President Carter. C. KUMAR N. PATEL (NAS, NAE) is vice chancellor of research at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is the former executive director of research, Material Science, Engineering, and Academic Affairs Division of AT&T Bell Laboratories. He has served as a trustee of Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles and director of California Micro Devices, Milpitas, Calif. He is currently a director of Newport Corporation and chairman of the board of directors of Accuwave Corporation. He has received several awards in the field of lasers and quantum electronics. Most recently he was awarded the National Science Medal by President Clinton in 1996. JONATHAN D. POLLACK is senior advisor for international policy at the RAND Corporation. A political scientist, he is a specialist on East Asian political and security affairs, especially China. He has served as a consultant to the Ford

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The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy Foundation and Los Alamos National Laboratory and is a member of the National Council on U.S.-China Relations. REAR ADMIRAL ROBERT H. WERTHEIM (USN, ret.; NAE) was director of navy strategic systems projects from 1977 to 1980, responsible for development and support of U.S. submarine launched ballistic missile systems. From 1981 to 1988 he served as Lockheed Corporation's senior vice-president for science and engineering. He is a member of various advisory groups serving, among others, the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, U.S. Strategic Command, and the University of California.