eventual implementation. The group has also published a booklet, Taking Steps, which provides a useful information format and worksheet for the public on advance directives.

The Whitmore Foundation

Hospice for the Deaf

Contact:

Judith Lauterstein, Ph.D.

The George Whitmore Foundation

33 East 38th Street, Suite 3A

New York, NY 10016

212-867-6521

When hospitalized, the deaf frequently sustain long periods of social isolation. They cannot communicate with doctors and other hospital staff unless a qualified interpreter is present. Currently, there are no hospice programs actively serving the deaf community. The George Whitmore Foundation, in collaboration with the Jacob Perlow Hospice, will create a program of hospice care for the deaf at the end of life. A key component of this pilot program will be the collection of data from the deaf community about their experiences with end-stage illness.

Additional Internet Sites of Interest

The Compassionate Friends: www.jjt.com

Growth House, Inc.: www.growthhouse.org

The International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement: www.wwdc.com/death/iwg/iwg.html

The Union of American Hebrew Congregations: server.huc.edu/rjbackup/uahc/conv/adres/care.html

Health Care Financing Administration: www.hcfa.gov

Agency for Health Care Policy Research: www.ahcpr.gov



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