Appendixes



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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH Appendixes

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH This page in the original is blank.

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH APPENDIX A Biographical Information on the Committee on Health Effects of Waste Incineration Donald R. Mattison (Chair) is medical director at the March of Dimes in White Plains, New York. Previously, he was Dean of the Graduate School of Public Health and Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Mattison received his under-graduate education at Augsburg College (Minneapolis, Minnesota) majoring in chemistry and mathematics, and an M.S. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His medical education was received at The College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University and clinical training in obstetrics and gynecology at Sloane Hospital for Women, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. Dr. Mattison obtained postgraduate research training at the National Institutes of Health. From 1978 to 1984, Dr. Mattison was director of the Reproductive Toxicology Program in the Pregnancy Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health. From 1984 to 1990, Dr. Mattison was on the faculty of the University of Arkansas for medical sciences and advanced to professor of obstetrics and gynecology and professor of interdisciplinary toxicology. During this period, he was also acting director of the Human Risk Assessment Program at the National Center for Toxicological Research, a component of the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Mattison moved to the University of Pittsburgh in 1990. Dr. Mattison is a diplomat of the American Board of Toxicology. He is a member of the Commission on Life Sciences and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (National Research Council), chair of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (Institute of Medicine) and many other local and national boards. Dr. Mattison has chaired or co-chaired National Research Council committees

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH on biomarkers in reproductive and developmental toxicology, pesticides in the diets of infants and children, and risk assessment methodology. He has published more than 150 papers, chapters, and reviews in the areas of public health, reproductive and developmental toxicology, risk assessment, and clinical obstetrics and gynecology. Regina Austin is the William A. Schnader Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania. She received a B.A. from the University of Rochester in 1970 and a J.D. from Pennsylvania in 1973. She is a member of the Order of the Coif, the legal honorary society. Before joining the Penn faculty in 1977, Professor Austin was an associate with the firm of Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis. She has also been a visiting professor at Harvard and Stanford Law Schools. Professor Austin has written on various topics including the working conditions of low status minority and/or female workers; law, culture and black women's lack of wealth; governmental restraints on black leisure; and the minority grassroots environmental movement. Paul C. Chrostowski is principal of CPF Associates, Inc. He received a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Drexel University. Formerly, he was director of risk management programs for the Weinberg Group, on the faculty at Vassar College, a consultant in private practice, and vice president and director of research and development at ICF/Clement. He is a registered Qualified Environmental Professional. Dr. Chrostowski has over 25 years experience in industry, academia, and consulting in the fields of risk analysis, environmental chemistry, and environmental engineering. He has conducted environmental impact studies on risk assessments for over 100 waste management facilities on behalf of regulatory agencies or regulated parties. Marjorie J. Clarke is an instructor in the Department of Geography at Rutgers University. She has been an environmental consultant specializing in waste incineration emissions control and waste prevention techniques and a fellow at the Center for Applied Studies of the Environment at the City University of New York. She received a B.A. in geology from Smith College, an M.A. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University, an M.S. in energy technologies from New York University, and a Ph.D. in earth and environmental sciences at the City University of New York. She has been chair of the Integrated Waste Management Technical Committee of the Air and Waste Management Association since 1994, was past chair of AWMA's Solid Waste Thermal Treatment technical committee, and past chair of the Manhattan Citizens' Solid Waste Advisory Board. Edmund A. Crouch is a senior scientist for Cambridge Environmental, Inc., and an associate of the Department of Physics at Harvard University. Dr. Crouch

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH holds a B.A. in natural sciences (Theoretical Physics) and a Ph.D. in high energy physics, both from Cambridge University, United Kingdom. Dr. Crouch has published widely in the areas of environmental quality, risk assessment, and presentation and analysis of uncertainties. He has co-authored a major text in risk assessment, Risk/Benefit Analysis. Dr. Crouch has served as an advisor to various local and national agencies concerned with public health and the environment. He has written computer programs for the sophisticated analysis of results from carcinogenesis bioassays; has developed algorithms (on the levels of both theory and computer implementation) for the objective quantification of waste site contamination; and has designed Monte Carlo simulations for purposes of fully characterizing uncertainties and variabilities inherent in health risk assessment. Mary R. English is a research leader at the Energy, Environment, and Resources Center (EERC) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, as well as a member of the UT Waste Management Research and Education Institute. She also co-directs EERC's Program for Environmental Issues Analysis and Dialogue (Pro-Dialogue). She currently serves on the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management and completed a 3-year term on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. Her research since the 1970s has focused on environmental policy, particularly in the areas of waste management, land use, and energy. She has a Ph.D. in sociology and an M.S. in regional planning. Dominic Golding is a research assistant professor at the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University. He received his Ph.D. in geography from Clark University in 1988, where his research focused on occupational hazards and the social issues of risk assessment and risk management, especially with regard to nuclear power. His current research interests include the history and development of risk research, environmental equity, risk communication, and social trust. He is the author of “The Differential Susceptibility of Workers to Occupational Hazards: A Comparison of Policies in Sweden, Britain, and the United States,” co-author of “Managing Nuclear Accidents: A Model Emergency Response Plan for Power Plants and Communities,” and co-editor of “Social Theories of Risk,” “Worst Things First: The Debate over Risk-Based National Environmental Policies,” and “Preparing for Nuclear Power Plant Accidents.” Ian A. Greaves is associate professor in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health and associate dean in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. He received an undergraduate degree in biomedical science and a medical degree from Monash University, Australia. He was a National Health and Medical Research (Australia) traveling fellow and subsequently a faculty member in the Harvard School of Public Health. He is a fellow of the

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH Royal Australasian College of Physicians and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. He directs the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety at the University of Minnesota. S. Katherine Hammond is an associate professor of environmental health sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health. She received her B.A. from Oberlin College, her Ph.D. in chemistry from Brandeis University, and her M.S. in environmental health sciences from Harvard School of Public Health, where she holds an appointment as Visiting Lecturer in Industrial Hygiene. Her research has focused on assessing exposure to complex mixtures for epidemiologic studies; among the exposures she has evaluated are those associated with work in the semiconductor industry, diesel exhaust, and environmental tobacco smoke. She served as a consultant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Scientific Advisory Board in its review of the environmental tobacco smoke documents that culminated in the publication of Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders, and she is currently on the Acrylonitrile Advisory Panel for the National Cancer Institute. Allen Hershkowitz is a senior scientist in NRDC's Urban program, specializing in solid waste management, recycling, medical wastes, and sludge. He is the originator, principal coordinator, and co-chairman of the Board of the Bronx Community Paper Company, a half-billion dollar paper recycling and community development project in the South Bronx area of New York City, which will convert waste paper from the metropolitan area (and beyond) into newsprint. Dr. Hershkowitz has served as the chairman of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner's Advisory Board on Operating Requirements for Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators. In the past he served on the EPA's Science Advisory Board Subcommittee on Sludge Incineration, as well as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Peer Review Panel for its Report to Congress on the Health Implications of Medical Waste. Dr. Hershkowitz was the principal contractor for the United States Congress' Office of Technology Assessment 's Report to Congress on Municipal Solid Waste Management. He was a member of the U.S. EPA's Regulatory Negotiations on Fugitive Emissions from Equipment Leaks at Synthetic and Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industries. Prior to going to NRDC he was the director of solid waste research at INFORM, an environmental research group. His training into advanced solid waste management strategies includes more than two dozen research visits to Japan and Europe, as well as extensive on-site research at solid waste management facilities throughout the United States. Robert J. McCormick is founder and president of Franklin Engineering Group, Inc., an engineering firm specializing in the fields of waste combustion and air

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH pollution control. He received a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Washington University. He has over 20 years experience with industrial pollution control, and is a co-author of EPA's Engineering Handbook for Hazardous Waste Incineration. Thomas E. McKone is group leader for exposure and risk analysis at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an adjunct professor and researcher with the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. He has a Ph.D. and M.S. in engineering from UCLA. In addition to his membership on the Committee on Health Effects of Waste Incinerators, he is a member of the NAS Committee on Toxicology. He is also a member of the EPA Science Advisory Board, president of the International Society of Exposure Analysis (ISEA), and on the Council of the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA). He has served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the World Health Organization, and the Food and Agriculture Organization. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology and on the editorial board of the journal Risk Analysis. Adel F. Sarofim is Presidential Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah. He was affiliated with MIT from 1958 to 1996 where he held the position of Lammot du Pont Professor of Chemical Engineering from 1989 to 1996, emeritus from October 1, 1996. He has been a visiting professor at Sheffield University, England, the University of Naples, Italy; and at the California Institute of Technology. His awards include the Sir Alfred Egerton Gold Medal from the Combustion Institute; the Kuwait Prize for Petrochemical Engineering; the Walter Ahlstr öm Environmental Prize of the Finnish Academies of Technology; the University of Pittsburgh's 1995 Award for Innovation in Coal Conversion; the DOE's 1996 Homer H. Lowry Award in Fossil Energy and the AIME/ASME 1996 Percy Nicholls Award. Carl M. Shy received an M.D. degree from Marquette University School of Medicine (1962) and a doctor of public health degree in epidemiology from the University of Michigan School of Public Health (1967). Formerly, he was director of the Human Studies Laboratory at the U.S. EPA, and since 1974 has been on the faculty of the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he is now a full professor. His career research and teaching interests have been focused on environmental and occupational health, with particular emphasis on air pollution and environmentally-related respiratory disease. George D. Thurston is an associate professor on the faculty of the Department of Environmental Medicine at the New York University School of Medicine. His research primarily involves the measurement and health effects assessment

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WASTE INCINERATION & PUBLIC HEALTH of air pollutants. He has recently been called upon several times by the U.S. Congress during Clean Air Act hearings to testify regarding the known human health effects of air pollution. His past research has included field studies of the effects of ozone and acid aerosols on the incidence of asthma attacks in children, as well as time-series studies of the effects of air pollution on the incidence of daily hospital admissions and human mortality. Dr. Thurston has served as an associate editor of the Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology since 1993. Prior to joining the NYU faculty in 1984, he was a research fellow at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Thurston received a B.S. in engineering from Brown University in 1974, and his doctorate from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1983.