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Ibex A Adaptability engineers, 33, 102-104, 119-120, 123 organizations, 104-107 Age distribution, 54, 102, 103;figure) AmericanIndians, 65, 78,94. See also Minorities American Society for Engineering Education {ASEE),54 Asian Americans, 7, 65,94. See also Minorities Association for Computing Machinery, 76 Associations. See Professional societies Automation, 33 B Biochemical engineering, 32 Biotechnology, 32 Blacks, 7, 64-65, 78,94. See also Minorities . Broad engineering education, 68- 69,78, 117, 122 C Chemical engineering, 93, 98, 100 Civil engineering, 25, 26,93,98 Communication, 115, 122 Computer-aided design CAD), 96 Computer engineering, 32, 67,96- 97 Computers and computer-aided instruction, 73, 81 Computer science education, 76, 118 Computer specialists, 32, 43, 89- 90,89{figure),92 Concentrationratios,88-90,89(fig- ure}, 105-106 Consulting, 77, 78 Continuing education, 6, 71-72, 81-82,104, 107, 121 Cooperative education, 4, 69-70, 79 Core courses approach, 68. See also Broad engineering education Corporations. See Industry 133

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134 Cross-disciplinary movement, 103 104 Curriculum requirements, 3-4, 68 69, 78, 117-120,122-123 D Databases,39, 43, 49, 86-87 Demand. See Supply and demand Detailed "stock" flow diagrams, 38, 42;figure},42ttable) Discrimination, 93-94, 106 Dislocation, 6,33, 104, 107. See also Adaptability Diversification, 31-33 Doctoral degrees faculty shortage and, 2,53-54, 80-81 future needs, 116 minority output, 65 output of, 56, 58-59,58{figure) salaries and, 54-56, 55ifigure}, 100, lOl~figure} student preparedness, 74 See also Graduate education Dual-degree programs, 67-68, 83- 84 E Economic awareness, 116-117, 122 Education. See Engineering education Educational technology, 73, 81 Electrical/ electronic engineering, 67,91-93,97 Employment adaptability factors, 33, 102-107, 119-120, 123 aging and retirement factors, 54, 102 concentration ratios, 88-90, 89tfigure), 105-106 dislocation, 6,33, 104,107 federal government work force, 5-6,88,105 INDEX findings, conclusions, andrecom mendations, 105-107 growth, 87, 88;figure,, 105 management practices, 6, 104 105, 107 minorities, 6-8,94-95 mobility, 93-95, 101-102 occupational structure problems, 5,105-106 predominant work activity,90 91,91{table) quality of workforce, 3-4,96-97, 106 salaries, 54-56, 55{figure), 94, 98, 99ifigures,, 100, lOl~figureJ, 105 specialization, 91-92, 92{table,, 93{figure) supply and demand, 4, 97-98, 106 unemployment rates, 101 women, 6-8,92-94, 106 work force flux, 33 See also Faculty Engineering changes in, 31-33 committee approach to, 22-23 conclusions and perspectives on 10-11 context of study on, 21-22 economic changes and,51, 52|figure, educational system status, 1-3 employment statue, 4-6 engineer competency, 3-4 future trends, 8-10 history of, 25-27 national interests role, 27 public attitudes toward, 28 quality of life role, 27-28 recommendations for, 11-17 report structure, 23-24 women and minorities status, 6-8 Engineering community data base problems, 39, 43, 49 definitions, 35-37

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INDEX findings, conclusions, and recom mendations,49-50 flow diagrams of,37-39,38ifig ure},40-41{figure),42tfigure), 43, 42ttable},49 manpowermodel,44,45{figure) support organizations, 44, 46-50 Engineering disciplines, 32n age distribution and, 102 diversification of, 31-33 employment in, 91-92,92ttable), 93tfigure, movement among, 103-104 women in, 93 Engineering education computer science, 76, 118 continuing education, 6,71-72, 81-82, 104, 107, 121 cooperative, 4, 69-70,79 curriculum requirements, 3-4, 68-69,78,117-120, 122-123 data base problems, 43 educational technology, 73, 81 emergence of, 25 engineering technology pro grams, 74-75, 82 equipment and facility problems, 60, 62, 82 faculty shortage, 2,53-56, 68, 80-81, 84 federal government support, 26, 59-63, 76, 83 findings, conclusions, and reeom mendations, 78-84 future needs, 116-120, 122-123 graduate degrees, 56, 57;table,, 58-59 national economic events and, F 51,52;figure} nontechnical content, 3-4, 69, 117-119, 122 precollege preparation, 8, 65-66, 73-74,78-80 problems of, 1-3 student demographics, 63-66, 64;figure) 135 supply and demand factors, 66 68, 102, 103tfigure) two-tiered system, 61-63, 83 university-industry interaction, 76-78,82 See also Faculty Engineering manpower model, 44, 45 ~figure) Engineering technicians. See Tech nlclans Engineering technologists. See Technologists Engineering technology programs, 74-75,82 Engineers adaptability of, 33, 102- 104, 119 120, 123 age distribution, 102, 103tfigure) career effectiveness, 121 competency of, 3-4, 96-97j 106 concentration ratios, 89-90. 89;figure,, 105-106 definition of, 36 minority group, 6, 7,94-95 predominant work activity,90 91, 91{table) salaries, 98, 99{figures), 100, 101 Figure) shortages and surpluses, 97-98 unemployment rate, 101 uses of, 33 women, 5-8, 92-94 work force flux, 33 See also Employment; Engineer ing education; Faculty Equipment and facilities, 60, 62, 82 Faculty age and retirement faetors,54 engineering technology and engi neering, friction between, 75 industry interaction, 77, 78 salaries, 54-56, 55;figure), 94, 100

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136 shortage, 2,53-56, 68,80-81,84 mobility and, 102 research involvement, 62-63 women, 7, 93, 94, 106 Federal government employee education, 72 employment objectives, 113-114 engineering employment, S-6, 88, 105 equipment and facilities support, 60 fellowship funding, 59 research and development sup- port, 26, 61-63, 76, 83 salaries, 100, 105 Fellowships, 59, 80-81 Flow diagrams basic, 37, 38{figure) benefits of, 38-39 comprehensive,37-38,40- 41 {figure), 49 data base problems, 43 detailed stock, 38, 42(figure} secondary school student flows, 38, 42tfigure},42ltable) Foreign nationals, 33, 56, 58 Future change adaptation mechanisms, 117-121 characteristics, 111-113, 121- 122 findings, conclusions, and recom- mendations, 121-123 impacts and implications, 113- 117 G Georgia Tech, 69 Global economy, 114- 115 Graduate education degreeoutput,56,57ttable),58- 59 federal support, 61-63 fellowships, 59, 80-81 future needs, 116 INDEX student preparedness, 74 See also Doctoral degrees; Engi- neering education H Higher Education General Informa- tion Survey, 43 Hispanics, 65, 78,94. See also Minorities Industrial engineering, 26,91,92 Industry concentration ratios and, 88-89 cooperative education programs, 69-70,79 corporate framework, 31, 33 employee education, 71-72, 81- 82,96, 106 employment objectives, 113- 114 equipment support, 60 fellowship funding, 59 professional society interaction, 47-48 research and development sup- port, 61-63, 83 salaries, 100 university collaboration, -77-78. 82 Institute of Electrical and Electron- ics Engineers, 76 International competition, l 14-115 Jefferson, Thomas, 25 lob orientation "raining, 96, 106 M Management practices, 6, 104-105, 107 Management skills, 120-121 Manpowermodel,44,45(figure}

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INDEX Manufacturing automation, 33 Master's degrees, 59, 65. See also Graduate education Mathematics education, 8, 65-66, 74,78,80 Mechanical engineering, 25, 26, 91-93, 102 Media coverage, 48-50 Minorities employment, 6-8,94-95 engineering education, 7,8, 64 66, 64 (figure) precollege education needs, 8 Mobility, 93-95, 101-102 Morrill Act, 26 N National Science Foundation {NSPl, 35n, 82,83 National strength and influence, 27 Nontechnical education, 3-4, 69, 117-119,122 Northeastern University, 69 Nuclear engineers, 100 p Panel on Engineering Employment Characteristics, 86-87, 97 Panel on Engineering Interactions With Society, 97 Panel on Graduate Education and Research, 56, 59, 97 Panel on Infrastructure Diagram ming and Modeling, 97 data base evaluation, 39, 43 definition development, 35-37 engineering manpower model, 44, 45{figure) flow diagrams, 37-39, 38{figure) 40-41ifigureJ, 42{figure}, 42{table},43 objectives and accomplishments 34-35 137 Panel on Support Organizations, 44, 46-49 Panel on Undergraduate Education, 97 Personal career management, 119- 120 Precollege education, 8, 65-66, 73- 74, 78-80 Predominant work activity, 90-91, 91 {table} Productivity, 9, 96 Professional development, 71-72. See also Continuing education Professional societies, 46-50, 60, 72,76,79,80 Public attitudes, 28,48-50 Public land-grant college system, 26 Public/private sector versatility, 113- 114, 122 Q Quality of engineers, 3-4, 96-97, 106 Quality of life, 27-28 R Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 25, 76 Research and development {R&Dl, 26,60-63,76,77,82,83,93, 105 Research Triangle Park, North Car- olina,76 Resource shortages, 114, 122 Retirement, 54, 102 S Salaries ), faculty, 54-56, 55|figure), 94, 100 levels of, 98, 99(figures), 100, 101{figure), 105 Science education, 8, 65-66, 74,80 Scientific change, 115-116, 122

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138 Secondary school student flows, 38, 42;figure],42;table) Shortages. See Faculty; Resource shortages; Supply and demand Social responsibilities, 28 Specialization, 68-69, 78, 91-92, 92ttable),93tfigure) Staff support poor, 37 State programs, 76-77 Student demographics, 63-66, 64ifigure) Student preparedness, 73-74, 80 Supply and demand, 8-10 Aging and retirement factors, 102, 103{figure} - engineering education and, 66 68,102, 103(figure) problems of, 97 salary factors, 98, 99tfigure,, 100, lOl~figure), 105 shortage and surplus factors, 4, 97-98,106 Support structure, 44, 46-50 T Technical reserve poor, 37 Technical societies. See Profes sional societies Technicians, 5, 33, 37, 43, 89-91, 89tfigure), 105-106 Technological change, 115-116 Technologists, 5,33, 36-37, 90, 91, 100, 105-106 INDEX Three-two programs, 67-68,83-84 Two-tiered system, 61-63, 83 Undergraduate education curriculum requirements, 68-69, 78, 119-120,122-123 demand variability and, 67-68, 83-84 engineering technology pro- grams,74-75,82 minorities, 64-66 research, 62, 83 two-tier system, 62,83 women in, 63,93 See also Engineering education Unemployment rates, 101 University-industry interactions, 76-78, 82 University of Arizona, 76 University of Cincinnati, 69 W ^}Vest Point, 25 Women employment, 6-8,92-94, 106 engineering education, 7, 63, 64tfigure), 78, 93 faculty, 7-8, 106 precollege education needs, 8, 78 Work force. See Employment Work-study programs, 4, 70, 79,120

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