Telephone Interview with Doctoral Alumna Sarita Bhalotra Thursday, August 31, 1995, 1:30 p.m.

1a. Based on your experience and familiarity with the Pew program, what did the fellowship really accomplish? What are the most important contributions?

The most important thing that the Pew program accomplished for me was the opportunity to network with a lot of important players in the health policy field, including the other Pew fellows, as well as the people that they worked with. The Pew conferences were very important; we got to meet other Pew fellows and the senior persons they worked with.

1b. What is the Pew "legacy" in terms of:

  1. health policy?

    The Brandeis program is a good program, built as it were around the Heller School. The PhD could have been a little more in depth as far as health policy is concerned. I felt that I got a lot more familiar with health policy with the work that I've done beyond what the PhD program had to offer.

  2. education?

    In terms of my education, it's been priceless. Frankly, without the Pew stipend I wouldn't have entered this program. It was just enough to get me to stop working. It provided the catalyst.

  3. your future?

    I think it has changed my direction in terms of health services and health policy research. When I entered the program I didn't think it would have had that effect. I thought it would be a stepping stone for health care settings, which I am not ruling out right now, but at this point at least I am more interested in research.

2. What was the most innovative or unique aspect of your program design and implementation?

Jon Chilingerian's seminar, which he implemented the second year that I was a Pew fellow, was not just innovative and unique but was also very influential. It filled a spot that needed to be filled. I'm sorry that we did not have it that



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