The Pew Health Policy Program was the first Trusts-initiated program, and it represented Pew's desire to play a more active role in the programs that it sponsored.

interviews with fellows and alumni sharing their experiences in pursuing midcareer, fast-track doctorate and postdoctorate education. In describing the field, the report would illustrate the importance of health services and health policy research and the role that the Pew Health Policy Program (PHPP) has played in this arena, as well as in the areas of leadership training and health policy development. Finally, the report was to describe the next generation of such programs and how and where they might be developed and funded. A report such as this was deemed important because the PHPP experience was an especially rich one due to the various formats of graduate training in health policy that the program helped to develop. The original thinkers hypothesized that differentiating between these programs would help guide future programs and identify aspects that were replicable and transferable.

THE BIRTH OF THE PEW HEALTH POLICY PROGRAM

By 1994, the Pew Charitable Trusts had eight signature scholarship programs. The Pew Health Policy Program (PHPP) was the oldest of the eight programs and the first with a national scope.1 In many ways PHPP, which was established in 1982 and which selected its first fellows in 1983, was a crucial experiment for the Pew Charitable Trusts, because, until the establishment of PHPP, Pew grants had predominantly been distributed in Pennsylvania.

When PHPP was designed, the operating philosophy of the Pew Charitable Trusts was strikingly different from what it had been during the development of earlier signature fellowship programs. PHPP was the first Trusts-initiated program, and it represented Pew's desire to play a more active role in the programs that it sponsored. The Pew Charitable Trusts developed their own programmatic initiatives and, together with the institutions selected to run the programs, helped to shape the process (Hamilton, 1995).

Traditionally, the Pew Charitable Trusts had focused on supporting the ''bricks and mortar'' endeavors in health and education. Rapid growth, however, in both the assets and the interests of the Pew Charitable Trusts during the 1970s, combined with significant changes in the nation's health care delivery, research, and funding systems, influenced the Pew Charitable Trusts to change their focus toward program building and human development. With the establishment of PHPP, Pew aimed to enrich the content of a subject area that was suffering from limited academic recognition and

1  

The seven other signature scholarship programs were: The Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences/Latin American Fellows; Pew Fellowships in the Arts; Pew National Arts Journalism Program; Pew Economic Freedom Fellowships; Pew Global Security Initiative; Pew Evangelical Scholars; and Pew Scholars in Conservation and the Environment.



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