Appendix D Letter Requesting Comments from Industry

June 21, 1996

(202) 334-2855

Dear

At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Research Council (NRC) is conducting a study of advanced technologies for human support in space. The specific purview of the committee is the NASA Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications (OLMSA) programs to develop advanced technology for life support systems, extravehicular activity suits and systems, environmental monitoring and control (within pressurized habitats), and space human factors engineering. This letter is to request a written input from your organization on topics important to our study. Based on your experience in human support in space, and in consultation with NASA, your organization is one of several from which we are seeking information. Please be assured that information in your response identified as proprietary will be treated as such. Proprietary information can also be limited to distribution to certain members of the committee (as directed by you, please see enclosed roster of committee members). Our questions are as follows:

  1. What are your company's priorities and areas of expertise in technologies for human support in space? Do you have technologies that you believe could contribute to NASA's long-term needs in human support? Do you believe that NASA is aware of these technologies? Of the technologies that you possess or are working on, which do you consider ''evolutionary'' or "revolutionary"? Are you working on "revolutionary" technologies


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Appendix D Letter Requesting Comments from Industry June 21, 1996 (202) 334-2855 Dear At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Research Council (NRC) is conducting a study of advanced technologies for human support in space. The specific purview of the committee is the NASA Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications (OLMSA) programs to develop advanced technology for life support systems, extravehicular activity suits and systems, environmental monitoring and control (within pressurized habitats), and space human factors engineering. This letter is to request a written input from your organization on topics important to our study. Based on your experience in human support in space, and in consultation with NASA, your organization is one of several from which we are seeking information. Please be assured that information in your response identified as proprietary will be treated as such. Proprietary information can also be limited to distribution to certain members of the committee (as directed by you, please see enclosed roster of committee members). Our questions are as follows: What are your company's priorities and areas of expertise in technologies for human support in space? Do you have technologies that you believe could contribute to NASA's long-term needs in human support? Do you believe that NASA is aware of these technologies? Of the technologies that you possess or are working on, which do you consider ''evolutionary'' or "revolutionary"? Are you working on "revolutionary" technologies

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that might lead to large reductions in weight, volume, power, or cost requirements? Would you be willing to discuss your technologies with the committee? What do you believe should be the priorities of NASA's programs to develop advanced technology for human support in space? For example, should NASA effort focus on improving existing technologies or on developing new "revolutionary" technologies? To what extent has your organization sought funding for relevant technology development projects from NASA and OLMSA, or sought to coordinate your own independent R&D projects with those of NASA and OLMSA? How should NASA and industry interact in the development of new technology for human support in space? We will consider the responses to this letter and expect to draw up an invitation list for industrial representatives to meet with the committee in Washington, D.C., some time in mid-August. Our study report is scheduled for delivery in December 1996. You will be sent a copy and it will be widely disseminated to NASA and other federal officials, selected members of Congress and their staffs, and others who are involved in research or national space science and technology policy. Briefings on the report will be given to NASA and other officials as appropriate. Several relevant documents are enclosed: the statement of task for the study, the roster for the committee, and brochures describing the roles of the NRC and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. I hope your organization will find the time to respond to this request. We respectfully request your input by August 5, 1996. If you have any question, please contact the study director of the project, Mr. Noel Eldridge, at the address above, or via e-mail at neldridg@nas.edu. Thank you for your help in assuring that the committee is informed of your company's work. Sincerely, James Bagian, P.E., M.D. Chairman Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space Enclosures