Page 2

BOX ES.1
Research Areas of Interest to the Entertainment Industry
and the Defense Modeling and  Simulation Community

Technologies for Immersion

Image generation—graphics computers capable of generating complex visual images.
Tracking—technologies for monitoring the head position and orientation of participants in virtual environments.
Perambulation—technologies that allow participants to walk through virtual environments while experiencing hills, bumps, obstructions, etc.
Virtual presence—technologies for providing a wide range of sensory stimuli: visual, auditory, olfactory, vibrotactile, and electrotactile.

Networked Simulation

Higher-bandwidth networks—to allow faster communication of greater amounts of information among participants.
Multicast and area-of-interest managers—to facilitate many-to-many communications while using limited bandwidth.
Latency reduction—techniques for reducing true or perceived delays in distributed simulations.

Standards for Interoperability

Virtual reality transfer protocol—to facilitate large scale networking of distributed virtual environments
Architecture for interoperability—network and software architectures to allow scalability of distributed simulations without degrading performance
Interoperability standards—protocols that allow simulators to work together effectively and facilitate the construction of large simulations from existing subsystems

Computer-generated Characters

Adaptability—development of computer-generated characters that can modify their behavior automatically over time
Individual behaviors —computer-generated characters that accurately portray the actions and responses of individual participants in a simulation rather than those of aggregated entities such as tank crews or platoons.
Human representations —authentic avatars that look, move and speak like humans.

continues

 


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement