TABLE 3-5 Topics and Variables from Phases I and II of the 1994-1996 Disability Survey, Population 18-64 Years of Age

PHASE I: TOPICS

PHASE II: TOPICS AND VARIABLES

Sensory impairments (problems with seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting)

Repeated

Communication problems

 

Learning problems

 

Specified diseases and conditions

Specified diseases and conditions

ADL impairments (need for hands-on help or supervision, extent of difficulty

Repeated with many variables, including difficulty, pain, and speed of performance

IADL impairments (need for hands-on help or supervision, extent of difficulty

Repeated with many variables, including difficulty, pain, and speed of performance

Other functions and activities (lifting, walking, standing, bending, reaching, using fingers to grasp or handle objects)

Repeated with many variables, including the difficulty with the function or activity

Mental and emotional problems (impact on ability to find or keep a job and kind or amount of work the person can do)

 

Participation in sheltered workshop, work training, and supported employment

Repeated with many variables

Use of physical or occupational therapy

Repeated with many additional services

Use of vocational rehabilitation services

Repeated with many variables

Use of assistive devices

Repeated with many variables

Income and assets

 

Receipt of disability payments

 

Employment status

Employment status or work history (ever worked, type of work, volunteer work)

 

Need for accommodations in order to work (e.g., ramps, parking, special workstation)

 

Need for other assistance to work (e.g., interpreter, job coach, personal attendant)

 

Reasons for not working or looking for work (e.g., fear of loss of disability benefits, or health insurance, lack of transportation)

 

Type of living situation (e.g., apartment, group home, center for independent living); adaptations or modifications to home, services provided by living situation

 

Transportation (ability to drive, use of regular public transportation, special transportation, mobility training)

 

Social activities (e.g., visit friends or relatives, go out, talk on the telephone)

 

SOURCE: NCHS, 1995.



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