6
Publications and Other Activities

Other activities in which humanities Ph.D.s participated included publishing, membership in professional societies, work-related training, and committee service. What was the extent of this participation and what fields were more heavily represented in these activities?

  • Over half (57 percent) of humanities doctorates had a publication between April 1994 and April 1995. ("Publication" includes articles in refereed journals, creative works in juried media, book/article reviews, chapters in edited volumes, textbooks, and other types of books.) Historians and art historians were more likely than other doctorates to publish (between 67 and 69 percent), whereas music doctorates were least likely (33 percent). In fact, 39 percent of all historians had three or more publications. This compares with 30 percent for all Ph.D.s and 14 percent for music doctorates. The mean number of publications for all humanities doctorates was 2.5 (see Table 30).
  • By sector, over three-fifths (62 percent) of academically employed doctorates published between April 1994 and April 1995, compared with only 27 percent of those in private for-profit companies. One-third (34 percent) of all academics had three or more publications, compared with only 9 percent of those in private for-profit companies.
  • Looking at academe, assistant professors were most likely to have published (73 percent), with full professors and associate professors slightly behind (68 and 66 percent, respectively). In contrast, only 40 percent of adjunct professors published. Those on a tenure track were more likely to have published than those with tenure (75 versus 67 percent). The mean number of publications for those in academe was 2.8, slightly higher than the overall mean (see Table 31).
  • In 1995, 83 percent of all humanities Ph.D.s belonged to at least one professional organization. This ranged from a high of 88 percent of music doctorates to a low of 78 percent of English doctorates (see Table 32).
  • Over two-fifths (44 percent) of humanities doctorates had attended work-related training activities in the year preceding the survey. By field, participation in work-related training ranged from 28 percent for art history doctorates to 48 percent for music and "other humanities" doctorates. These activities included technical training (69 percent of those who attended training activities); professional training, such as public speaking or business writing (23 percent); management or supervisory training (21 percent); and other work-related training (18 percent). Nearly 90 percent of those attending work-related training activities indicated that the purpose of the training was to increase skills in their occupational field (see Table 33). Musicians were most likely to have indicated this purpose (95 percent), while philosophers were least likely (82 percent). The second most


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6 Publications and Other Activities Other activities in which humanities Ph.D.s participated included publishing, membership in professional societies, work-related training, and committee service. What was the extent of this participation and what fields were more heavily represented in these activities? Over half (57 percent) of humanities doctorates had a publication between April 1994 and April 1995. ("Publication" includes articles in refereed journals, creative works in juried media, book/article reviews, chapters in edited volumes, textbooks, and other types of books.) Historians and art historians were more likely than other doctorates to publish (between 67 and 69 percent), whereas music doctorates were least likely (33 percent). In fact, 39 percent of all historians had three or more publications. This compares with 30 percent for all Ph.D.s and 14 percent for music doctorates. The mean number of publications for all humanities doctorates was 2.5 (see Table 30). By sector, over three-fifths (62 percent) of academically employed doctorates published between April 1994 and April 1995, compared with only 27 percent of those in private for-profit companies. One-third (34 percent) of all academics had three or more publications, compared with only 9 percent of those in private for-profit companies. Looking at academe, assistant professors were most likely to have published (73 percent), with full professors and associate professors slightly behind (68 and 66 percent, respectively). In contrast, only 40 percent of adjunct professors published. Those on a tenure track were more likely to have published than those with tenure (75 versus 67 percent). The mean number of publications for those in academe was 2.8, slightly higher than the overall mean (see Table 31). In 1995, 83 percent of all humanities Ph.D.s belonged to at least one professional organization. This ranged from a high of 88 percent of music doctorates to a low of 78 percent of English doctorates (see Table 32). Over two-fifths (44 percent) of humanities doctorates had attended work-related training activities in the year preceding the survey. By field, participation in work-related training ranged from 28 percent for art history doctorates to 48 percent for music and "other humanities" doctorates. These activities included technical training (69 percent of those who attended training activities); professional training, such as public speaking or business writing (23 percent); management or supervisory training (21 percent); and other work-related training (18 percent). Nearly 90 percent of those attending work-related training activities indicated that the purpose of the training was to increase skills in their occupational field (see Table 33). Musicians were most likely to have indicated this purpose (95 percent), while philosophers were least likely (82 percent). The second most

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frequent reason given for work-related training was that it was required or expected by one's employer (36 percent). Approximately one-third of humanists had performed committee service in the year preceding the survey. Historians and art historians (both around 40 percent) were most likely to have done so; philosophers and classicists (both at 30 percent) were least likely. Two-fifths (39 percent) of those doing committee work served as committee chairs (see Table 34). Figure 13. Mean number of publications by humanities Ph.D.s between April 1994 and April 1995, by field.