APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Ronald W. Yates (chair), U.S. Air Force, retired, is an independent consultant to the aerospace industry. Gen Yates spent 35 years in the U.S. Air Force. He is a fighter pilot and test pilot and has 5,000 flying hours in more than 50 different types of aircraft. He has extensive experience in the acquisition business having served as program director of both the F-15 and F-16 System Program Offices. He was also a test wing commander. He served as Air Force Director of Tactical Programs in the Pentagon and as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. He was the Commander of both the Air Force Systems Command and the Air Force Materiel Command, where he was responsible for all Air Force research, development, acquisition policy, and logistics. He is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots; a commissioner for the National Research Council (NRC) Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems; and a member of the Ballistic Missile Defense Office Advisory Group. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and holds a masters degree in systems management from the University of Southern California.

Donald W. Bahr was Manager, Combustion Technology at GE Aircraft Engines for more than 20 years prior to his retirement in 1994. He joined GE Aircraft Engines in 1956 as a combustion research engineer. As Manager, Combustion Technology, he was responsible for the design, development, and certification of a variety of combustion systems used in both commercial and military aircraft turbine engines, as well as combustion systems used in industrial turbine engines. A major aspect of these responsibilities was the evolution of low pollutant emission combustors. Mr. Bahr graduated from the University of Illinois with a B.S. in chemical engineering and from the Illinois Institute of Technology with M.S.



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U.S. Supersonic Commercial Aircraft: Assessing NASA's High Speed Research Program APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Ronald W. Yates (chair), U.S. Air Force, retired, is an independent consultant to the aerospace industry. Gen Yates spent 35 years in the U.S. Air Force. He is a fighter pilot and test pilot and has 5,000 flying hours in more than 50 different types of aircraft. He has extensive experience in the acquisition business having served as program director of both the F-15 and F-16 System Program Offices. He was also a test wing commander. He served as Air Force Director of Tactical Programs in the Pentagon and as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. He was the Commander of both the Air Force Systems Command and the Air Force Materiel Command, where he was responsible for all Air Force research, development, acquisition policy, and logistics. He is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots; a commissioner for the National Research Council (NRC) Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems; and a member of the Ballistic Missile Defense Office Advisory Group. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and holds a masters degree in systems management from the University of Southern California. Donald W. Bahr was Manager, Combustion Technology at GE Aircraft Engines for more than 20 years prior to his retirement in 1994. He joined GE Aircraft Engines in 1956 as a combustion research engineer. As Manager, Combustion Technology, he was responsible for the design, development, and certification of a variety of combustion systems used in both commercial and military aircraft turbine engines, as well as combustion systems used in industrial turbine engines. A major aspect of these responsibilities was the evolution of low pollutant emission combustors. Mr. Bahr graduated from the University of Illinois with a B.S. in chemical engineering and from the Illinois Institute of Technology with M.S.

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U.S. Supersonic Commercial Aircraft: Assessing NASA's High Speed Research Program degrees in chemical engineering and gas technology. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the General Electric Propulsion Hall of Fame. James B. Day is a private consultant in the aircraft propulsion industry. He spent 34 years working in propulsion research and development for the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. During his tenure, he had major responsibilities during the development of engines for the F-15, F-16, A-10, B-1B, B-2A, C-17, and F-22 aircraft. He was chief engineer for Air Force engine development for 10 years and spent two years as general manager for development engines. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Kentucky, Lexington. Antony Jameson is the Thomas V. Jones Professor of Engineering in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. He is also professor emeritus at Princeton University and, until 1996, he was the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Aerospace Engineering at Princeton. During the last decade, Professor Jameson has devised a variety of new schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for inviscid and viscous compressible flows and has written a series of computer programs that have been widely used in the aircraft industry. Dr. Jameson has also served as the director of Princeton University's Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics. Before joining the faculty of Princeton University in 1980, he was a professor of computer science at New York University, where he concentrated on developing models to predict transonic flow. During the 1960s, Dr. Jameson worked for Hawker Siddeley Dynamics in Coventry, England, and Grumman Aerospace Corporation in Bethpage, New York, where he applied automatic control theory to the development of stability augmentation systems. Dr. Jameson studied engineering at Trinity Hall, Cambridge University, obtaining a Ph.D. in magneto-hydrodynamics. He is a recipient of the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, the Gold Medal of the British Royal Aeronautical Society, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Fluid Dynamics Award, and the ASME Spirit of St. Louis Medal. He is a foreign associate of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the AIAA, an honorary fellow of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge. Donald T. Lovell was Chief Engineer of Structures Engineering, Boeing Materials Technology, until he retired in 1995. This group is responsible for research, development, design analysis, production, and airline support for all materials and processes used on Boeing commercial airplanes. Mr. Lovell worked at Boeing for more than 38 years. He had direct engineering involvement with key programs including KC-135, B-52, Minuteman, "Man on the Moon" Saturn/Apollo,

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U.S. Supersonic Commercial Aircraft: Assessing NASA's High Speed Research Program Supersonic Transport (SST) Prototype, and the 707, 727, 737, 747, 757, 767, and 777 airplanes. After termination of the U.S. SST Prototype Program, Mr. Lovell was program manager of the Department of Transportation's SST Technology Follow-On Program. The objective of this program was to transfer advanced technologies developed by the SST program to other U.S. government and industry programs. He led the implementation of major new aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and composites for the 757, 767, and 777 airplanes. Mr. Lovell attended the GMI Engineering and Management Institute, obtaining a BSME, and the University of California, Berkeley, completing the Executive Management Program. He is a fellow of ASM International (formerly the American Society of Metals); served on materials committees of the ASM, AIAA, and Society for the Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering; and is a scholar emeritus at the University of Washington. John M. Reising is an engineering psychologist in Wright Laboratory's Vehicle-Pilot Integration Branch located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. His current research centers around advanced cockpit design, with a special emphasis on blending the many new cockpit technologies so the pilot can use them optimally. Currently under examination are 3-D stereo cathode ray tubes, flat panel displays, touch sensitive overlays, voice controls, and programmable switches. The focus of Dr. Reising's research is developing cockpit technologies that will facilitate and maximize effective communication between the pilot of the future and the artificially intelligent computers that will be housed in tomorrow's aircraft. Dr. Reising is a Wright Laboratory Fellow and a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He is also an adjunct professor in the Engineering Management Department of the University of Dayton, where he has taught human factors engineering since 1978. He has published more than 100 papers, journal articles, and technical reports. David K. Schmidt is a professor of aerospace engineering and Director of the Flight Dynamics and Control Laboratory at the University of Maryland at College Park. He has been with the University of Maryland since 1993. Previously, Dr. Schmidt was a member of the faculty of Arizona State University (for five years), as well as a member of the faculty of Purdue University (for 14 years). In addition to his academic experience, Dr. Schmidt has also been a member of the technical staffs of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Corporation in Huntington Beach, California, and the Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California. He has also held visiting research positions with the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory and with NASA's Langley Research Center. His area of expertise is the dynamics, guidance, and control of aerospace vehicles. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA and a member of the American Astronautical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Aerospace Control and Guidance Systems Committee

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U.S. Supersonic Commercial Aircraft: Assessing NASA's High Speed Research Program of the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aerospace Technical Committee of the International Federation for Automatic Control. He is past chairman of AIAA's technical committee on guidance, navigation, and control, and a past associate editor of the Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics. Finally, he recently served on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board's Review Panel for Science and Technology. Daniel P. Schrage is a professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He also serves as the Director of the Georgia Tech Center of Excellence in Rotorcraft Technology and as the Codirector of the Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory. He has been at Georgia Tech since 1984. Prior to his current academic position, Dr. Schrage served as an engineer, manager, and senior executive with the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM) from 1974 to 1984. His final position at AVSCOM was Director for Advanced Systems and while at AVSCOM he served on four major Army Aviation Source Selection Evaluation Boards and co-chaired the concept exploration effort for the LHX (Light Helicopter Experimental), now RAH-66 Comanche. In 1983, Dr. Schrage also served on a temporary assignment as the chief scientist for the Army's Combined Arms Center. Dr. Schrage also has considerable Army operational experience, having served as an Army aviator for nine years, with combat experience in Southeast Asia and as a field artillery battery commander in Europe. He recently retired as a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. Dr. Schrage has served on a number of advisory boards, such as the Army Science Board, the Air Force Studies Board, NASA Aeronautics Research Technology Subcomittees, and several NRC committees. Charlotte H. Teklitz is Vice President of AMR Training and Consulting Group (AMRTC). Ms. Teklitz has more than 10 years of experience specializing in planning and analysis. At AMRTC, she has overseen aviation consulting projects in the United States, Central America, Venezuela, the Philippines, Hawaii, Uruguay, and Australia. Projects include strategic planning, due diligence, schedule optimization, slot negotiations, executive information systems, start-up business plans, hub feasibility studies, revenue accounting, and fleet planning. Prior to AMRTC, Ms. Teklitz held analytical positions at American Airlines in pricing yield management, international planning, and corporate development. She has represented American Airlines in bilateral negotiations with Singapore and Thailand. Other major projects included investigation of route potentials between North American gateways and Fukuoka and Nagoya, Japan, and an evaluation of hubbing potential in Europe. Previously, she worked in finance and marketing at General Electric and Progressive Insurance. Ms. Teklitz is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where she received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering. She earned a Master of Management degree, with concentration in marketing and finance, from Northwestern University's J.L. Kellogg School of Management.

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U.S. Supersonic Commercial Aircraft: Assessing NASA's High Speed Research Program Earl R. Thompson is Director of the Materials and Structures Department of United Technologies Research Center in East Hartford, Connecticut. Dr. Thompson has been a staff member of the Research Center for more than 30 years. His research contribution has been primarily in the area of high temperature, structural materials. He is a fellow of ASM International and a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. He is a previous member of the NRC's National Materials Advisory Board. His B.S. and M.S. degrees in metallurgical engineering are from North Carolina State University, and his D.Sc. in materials science is from the University of Virginia. Dianne S. Wiley is the Manager of Airframe Technology in the Business and Advanced Systems Development Organization of Northrop Grumman's B-2 Division. She oversees five departments responsible for research and development in materials and processes, structural design and analysis, and manufacturing technology development. She has been with Northrop for 15 years. As Director of the Corporate Center of Excellence for Materials and Processes, she is responsible for coordinating the expertise and resources of the corporation to address the materials-and processes-related needs of major programs and to aggressively pursue developments in innovative and affordable materials and processes to address emerging needs of future weapon systems. Previously, as manager of the Advanced Structures Department, Dr. Wiley was responsible for directing a team of design engineers developing advanced structural concepts for aerospace applications. As a team member with Rockwell International on the Reusable Launch Vehicle NASA Research Agreement, she has used her aircraft structures experience to transition advanced organic composites to launch vehicle structures. She is also involved with Rockwell on preliminary design of wing and intertank structures for the X-33 advanced technology demonstrator. She is a member of the NASA-Industry Structures Synergy Team for Access to Space. Previously, she was a senior technical specialist on the B-2 program, responsible for developing and implementing innovative structural solutions to ensure the structural integrity of the B-2 aircraft. She draws on 20 years of experience in advanced structures research and development. Her technical experience includes durability and damage tolerance, advanced composites (organic and ceramic), high temperature structures, smart structures, low observable structures, concurrent engineering, and rapid prototyping.