EMIL WALTER HAURY

May 2, 1904–December 5, 1992

BY RAYMOND HARRIS THOMPSON, CALEB VANCE HAYNES, JR., AND JAMES JEFFERSON REID

AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY HAD difficulty overcoming its antiquarian origins until the first decades of this century when Alfred Vincent Kidder (1885–1963, NAS 1936) shifted the emphasis in the southwestern region of the country from whole pots and cliff dwellings to potsherds and culture history. His Introduction to the Study of Southwestern Archaeology , published in 1924, was the first synthesis of the prehistory of any North American region based on professionally recovered empirical data. A handful of pioneering archaeologists in several regions of the country completed the transformation initiated by Kidder.

Emil Haury was preeminent among these regional archaeologists. Influenced and inspired by Kidder, Haury kept the Southwest in the forefront of these early paradigm shifts in American archaeology. He was responsible for accumulating much of the evidence that gives the Southwest the most complete culture history of any region of North America. The Southwest, with its spectacular landscapes, well-preserved ruins, and surviving Indian communities had long fascinated eastern and midwestern Americans, including young Emil Haury. He went to Arizona in 1925 to study with Byron Cummings (1860–1954), who had been exploring cliff dwellings in southern Utah and northern Arizona since before



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