Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of the Committee Members and Technical Consultant

Members

John J. Wise (chair) is retired from his position as vice president of research at the Mobil Research and Development Corporation after 44 years with the company. His division conducted research and development in exploration, production, refining, and products, including aviation fuel chemistry. He holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Tufts University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

James B. Day is a private consultant in the air-breathing propulsion industry. He is a retired civilian engineer from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, with more than 34 years in jet engine research and development. During his career, he had major responsibilities in the development of engines for Air Force fighter, bomber, and transport aircraft, including the F-15, F-16, B-1, and B-2, and F-22. He was chief engineer for USAF engine development for 10 years and holds a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Kentucky.

Frederick L. Dryer received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University. He is currently professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Princeton University. His research interests include fundamental combustion science, high-temperature chemistry of hydrocarbons, and fire-safety-related phenomena.

Peyman Givi is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the CFD Laboratory at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He received a B.E. degree from Youngstown State University and a Ph.D. from Carnegie-Mellon University. His current research interests include turbulent combustion, computational fluid mechanics, analytical methods, and stochastic processes.

Richard H. Hall received a B.S.Ch.E. from Case Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Delaware. He worked as a chemist for the Dow Chemical Company for 39 years before retiring in 1992. Since then he has worked as a technical consultant for Imbibitive Technologies. His expertise is in petrochemical processes with an emphasis on additives, and he has been involved in a research program investigating gellants for crash safe fuels. He holds more than 100 patents in 17 countries.

Syed Qutubuddin is professor of chemical engineering and macro-molecular science at Case Western Reserve University. He holds a Ph.D. from Carnegie-Mellon University. Colloids, interfacial phenomena, and polymers constitute his basic research interests. Currently, he is involved in the study of polymer solutions and surfactant systems, particularly micro-emulsions, using rheological, laser light scattering, electrochemical, and other techniques. He has developed novel polymer blends and nanocomposites using colloidal approaches. Qutubuddin is a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award and the LaMer Award of the American Chemical Society.

Elizabeth J. Weckman is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. She received a B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Waterloo. Her expertise is in experimental combustion, ranging from fire measurements to application of advanced laser diagnostics for detailed characterization of burner flames. Her research has been particularly related to the behavior of pool fires and full-scale structural fires.

Technical Consultant

Thor I. Eklund is a consulting engineer specializing in aviation technology with primary focus on fire safety. He received a B.S.E. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in fluid mechanics from Brown University's Division of Engineering. He previously was manager of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Fire Research Branch, and his past research experience includes fuel flammability, fire resistant materials, fire modeling, fire detection and suppression, and smoke control in aircraft. He played a pivotal role in developing overall aviation safety plans for the FAA, in areas such as fire research, aging aircraft, security, and free flight.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 141
Aviation Fuels with Improved Fire Safety: A Proceedings Appendix C Biographical Sketches of the Committee Members and Technical Consultant Members John J. Wise (chair) is retired from his position as vice president of research at the Mobil Research and Development Corporation after 44 years with the company. His division conducted research and development in exploration, production, refining, and products, including aviation fuel chemistry. He holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Tufts University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. James B. Day is a private consultant in the air-breathing propulsion industry. He is a retired civilian engineer from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, with more than 34 years in jet engine research and development. During his career, he had major responsibilities in the development of engines for Air Force fighter, bomber, and transport aircraft, including the F-15, F-16, B-1, and B-2, and F-22. He was chief engineer for USAF engine development for 10 years and holds a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Kentucky. Frederick L. Dryer received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University. He is currently professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Princeton University. His research interests include fundamental combustion science, high-temperature chemistry of hydrocarbons, and fire-safety-related phenomena. Peyman Givi is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the CFD Laboratory at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He received a B.E. degree from Youngstown State University and a Ph.D. from Carnegie-Mellon University. His current research interests include turbulent combustion, computational fluid mechanics, analytical methods, and stochastic processes. Richard H. Hall received a B.S.Ch.E. from Case Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Delaware. He worked as a chemist for the Dow Chemical Company for 39 years before retiring in 1992. Since then he has worked as a technical consultant for Imbibitive Technologies. His expertise is in petrochemical processes with an emphasis on additives, and he has been involved in a research program investigating gellants for crash safe fuels. He holds more than 100 patents in 17 countries. Syed Qutubuddin is professor of chemical engineering and macro-molecular science at Case Western Reserve University. He holds a Ph.D. from Carnegie-Mellon University. Colloids, interfacial phenomena, and polymers constitute his basic research interests. Currently, he is involved in the study of polymer solutions and surfactant systems, particularly micro-emulsions, using rheological, laser light scattering, electrochemical, and other techniques. He has developed novel polymer blends and nanocomposites using colloidal approaches. Qutubuddin is a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award and the LaMer Award of the American Chemical Society. Elizabeth J. Weckman is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. She received a B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Waterloo. Her expertise is in experimental combustion, ranging from fire measurements to application of advanced laser diagnostics for detailed characterization of burner flames. Her research has been particularly related to the behavior of pool fires and full-scale structural fires. Technical Consultant Thor I. Eklund is a consulting engineer specializing in aviation technology with primary focus on fire safety. He received a B.S.E. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in fluid mechanics from Brown University's Division of Engineering. He previously was manager of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Fire Research Branch, and his past research experience includes fuel flammability, fire resistant materials, fire modeling, fire detection and suppression, and smoke control in aircraft. He played a pivotal role in developing overall aviation safety plans for the FAA, in areas such as fire research, aging aircraft, security, and free flight.