Click for next page ( R2


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page R1
ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES ~ . . ~ nglneenng Technology ret ~ . ~c.ucatlon Panel on Technology Education Subcommittee on Engineering Educational Systems Committee on the Education and Utilization of the Engineer Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1985

OCR for page R1
NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS 2101 ConstitutionAve.,NW Washington,DC20418 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to proce- dures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medi- cine. The National Research Council was established by the National Academy of Sci- ences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy's purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. The Council operates in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy under the authority of its congressional charter of 1863, which establishes the Academy as a private, nonprofit, self-governing membership corporation. The Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in the conduct of their services to the govern- ment, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. It is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. The National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine were established in 1964 and 1970, respec- tively, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences. Support for this work has been provided by the National Science Foundation, the Department of the Air Force, the Department of the Army, the Department of Energy, the Department of the Navy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Additionally, assistance has been provided through grants from the Eastman Kodak Company, Exxon Corporation, the General Electric Company, the IBM Corporation, the Lockheed Corporation, the Monsanto Company, and the Sloan Foundation. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 85-62838 ISBN 0-309-03632- 1 Printed in the United States of America

OCR for page R1
Preface The Panel on Technology Education was one of four panels estab- lished lay the Committee on the Education and Utilization of the Engi- neer to investigate educational aspects of the preparation of engineers in the United States. Although its membership was limited, the panel sought to provide as broad a base of experience and expertise as possi- ble. Panel members were drawn from the fields of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Their backgrounds included experience with large and small institutions, both state-supported and independent, and with programs that ranged from two-year curriculum through grad- uate study. In addition, panel members represented a number of geo- graphic areas, such as the Northeast, the Middle Atlantic states, and the Southwest. At the beginning of its study, the panel identified a list of topics that it considered to be of primary concern in engineering technology educa- tion. This report documents the panel's findings relating to these topics and its recommendations for further action. The study is also intended to provide supporting material for the main report, ~ to which readers are therefore referred for information in other areas of specific interest. For further information on educational issues, see also the companion volumes of the other three education panels. J *Engineering Education and Practice in the United States: Foundations of Our Techno-Economic Fu ture (Washington, D . C .: National Academy Press, 198 5 ~ . . . .

OCR for page R1
1V PREFACE In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to the many partici- pants in this study on technology education the panel members and the staffs of both the National Research Council and the Wentworth Institute of Technology for their invaluable efforts in collecting and condensing the available material. Edward T. Kirkpatrick Chairman >

OCR for page R1
Panel on Technology Education EDWARD T. KIRKPATRICK, Chairman; President, Wentworth Institute of Technology JOHN D. ANTHEM, General Manager, Certification Programs, National Society of Professional Engineers STEPHEN R. CHESHIER, President, Southern Technical Institute, Marietta, Georgia RICHARD A. KENYON, Dean, College of Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology LAWRENCE l. WOLF, Dean, College of Technology, University of Houston DONALD TRITSCHLER, Consultant, Shrewsl~ury, Massachusetts

OCR for page R1
Committee on the Education and Utilization of the Engineer ~ERRIERA. HADDAD, Chairman jIBM, Ret.) GEORGE S. ANSELL, Dean of Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute {now President, Colorado School of MinesJ JORDAN l. BARUCH, President, Jordan T. Baruch Associates ERICH BLOCH, Vice-President, IBM Corporation [now Director, National Science Foundation) DENNIS CHAMOT, Associate Director, Department for Professional Employees, AFL/CID EDMUND T. CRANCH, President, Worcester Polytechnic Institute DANIEL C. DRUCKER, Dean of Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana (now Graduate Research Professor of Engineering Sciences, University of Florida at Gainesville J FRED W. GARRY, Vice-President, Corporate Engineering and Manufacturing, General Electric Company JOHN W. GEILS, Director of ~ES/ASEE Faculty Shortage Project AT&T, Ret. ~ AARON I. GELLMAN, President, Gellman Research Associates, Inc. HELEN GOULDNER, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Sociology, University of Delaware JOHN D. KEMPER, Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Davis EDWARD T. KIRKPATRICK, President, Wentworth Institute of Technology V1

OCR for page R1
COMMITTEE MEMBERS ERNEST S. KUH, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California at Berkeley . . V11 W. EDWARD LEAR, Executive Director, American Society for Engineering Education LAWRENCE M. MEAD, OR., Senior Management Consultant iSenior Vice-President, Ret. J. Grumman Aerospace Corporation M. EUGENE MERCHANT, Principal Scientist, Manufacturing Research, Cincinnati Milacron, Inc. Now Director, Advanced Manufacturing Research, Metcut Research Associates, Inc. ~ RICHARD l. REDPATH, Vice-President, Ralston Purina Company FRANCIS E. REESE, Senior Vice-President, Monsanto [now retired) ROBERT M. SAUNDERS, Professor, School of Engineering, University of California at Irvine Chairman, Board of Governors, AAES, 1983) CHARLES E. SCHAFFNER, Executive Vice-President, Syska &c Hennessy JUDITH A. SCHWAN, Assistant Director, Research Labs, Eastman Kodak Company HAROLD T. SHAPIRO, President, The University of Michigan MORRIS A. STEINBERG, Vice-President, Science, Lockheed Corporation DONALD G. WEINERT, Executive Director, National Society of Professional Engineers SHEILA E. WIDNALL, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Staff WILLIAM H. MICHAEL, TR., Executive Director VERNON H. MILES, Staff Officer AMY TANIK, Administrative Assistant COURTLAND S. LEWIS, Consultant Government Liaison LEWIS G. MAYFIELD, Head, Office of Interdisciplinary Research, National Science Foundation

OCR for page R1

OCR for page R1
Contents Executive Summary 1. The History of Technical Institutes Accreditation, 5 . . Associations, 5 Development of the Junior College, 6 Continued Data Collection, 6 2. Engineering Technology and Industrial Technology Definitions, 7 Secondary School Preparation, 10 Recommendations, 10 3. Engineering Technology and Engineering Similarities, 11 Differences, 12 Transfer Opportunities, 14 Recommendations, 15 4. Engineering Technology Education . . . . .. .. Graduate Study, 16 Associate and Bachelor's Degree Programs, 18 Student Chapters, 19 Recommendations, 20 ix 4 .. 11 ... 16

OCR for page R1
x 5. Cooperative Education and Engineering Technology Federal Assistance, 22 Future Federal Funding, 23 Co-op Programs in Engineering Technology Education, 24 Concerns for the Future, 25 Recommendations, 27 6. Accreditation, Certification, and Licensing . Accreditation and Recognition of Quality, 28 Licensing and Certification, 28 Recommendations, 29 7. Manpower Considerations Enrollment, 30 Degrees, 31 Institutions and Programs, 31 Recommendation, 34 8. The Impact of High Technology Educational Technology and High-Tech Equipment, 35 Lack of Software, 36 High-Tech Lab Equipment Problems, 36 Recommendations, 38 9. Allocating Resources for Engineering Technology Education ............. Planning, 40 Bases for Resource Allocation, 40 Low-Technology Areas, 41 High-Technology Areas, 42 Conclusions, 44 Recommendations, 45 Notes CONTENTS .... 22 .. 28 . 30 . 35 . 39 . 46

OCR for page R1
ENG - EERING EDUCATION AND PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES =010g)T

OCR for page R1