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Appendix BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF BURTON SINGER, chair of the Panel on Indignation Statistics, is professor and chair of the Department of Statistics at Columbia University and adjunct professor, Laboratory of Populations at Rockefeller University. He also is a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. His interests include medical epidemiology, economics, demography, and the theory of stochastic processes. SAM BERNSEN is a practicing immigration attorney in Washington, D.C., with the firm of Fragomen, Del Rey & Bernsen, P.C. He also teaches immigration law at the law schools of American University and Catholic University. From 1974 to 1977 he served as general counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Previously he served in that agency as an assistant commissioner and as a district director. He has an LL.B. from Brooklyn Law School. GEORGE J. BORJAS is professor of California, Santa Barbara; he is also National Bureau of Economic Research. extent of quality changes among the United States in the postwar period. mathematics from St. Peter's College Columbia University. economics at the University of a research associate at the His present work examines the immigrant cohorts admitted to the He received a B.S. in economics and and a Ph.D. in economics from NORMAN L. CHERVANY is a professor of management sciences and director of professional management programs in the Graduate School of Management at the University of Minnesota. His major work is in the area of applied decision-information systems and in organizational strategy. He is past president and a fellow of the American Institute for Decision Sciences. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Mount Union College and M.B.A. and D.B.A. degrees in quantitative business analysis from Indiana University. KENNETH HILL, associate study director for the Panel on Immigration Statistics, has been on the staff of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council since 1977. His previous work experience has been mainly in the field of demographic statistics for developing countries, working for the 325

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326 Statistics Division of the government of Uganda, the Centre for Population Studies of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the U. N. Lat in American Demographic Centre, and the Committee on Populat ion and Demography of the Nat tonal Research Counc il. He has a Ph.D. from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has authored or coauthored numerous art icles and texts concerning the estimation of fertility, mortality and migration for developing countries. CHARLES B. KEELY is senior associate at the Populat ion Counc it in New York. He received a Ph.D. in sociology from Fordham University. His research interests include labor migration, especially in the Middle East, international policy and programs on refugees, and U.S. immigration policy and its demographic impacts. ELLEN PERCY KRALY is assistant professor of geography at Colgate University. She received an M.S. degree in demography from Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. in sociology from Fordham University. Her research focuses on federal and international statistics on immigration and emigration, the relationship between immigration and population growth, and trends in emigration from the United States. She is also directing a research project involving issues in infant nutrition. DANIEL B. LEVINE, study director for the Panel on Immigration Statistics, was formerly with the Bureau of the Census; he was deputy director between 1979 and 1982 and also served as acting director. His interests are in the management of statistical systems and in the collection, processing, and presentation of statistical information, particularly through the conduct of large-scale surveys and censuses. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received an M.A. in economics from Columbia University. MILTON D. MORRIS is director of research at the Joint Center for Political Studies. Previously he was associate professor of political science at Southern Illinois University, a research fellow at the Joint Center, and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. His research interests are in political behavior, race and ethnic relations, immigration, and urban policy. He received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from the University of Maryland. ALE JANDRO FORTES is professor of sociology at the Johns Hopkins University and a member of the faculty of the Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington. Previously he taught at Duke University, the University of Brasilia, the University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Illinois. He has served as chair of the Latin American and Caribbean Dissertation Fellowship Committee of the Social Science Research Council, program adviser for social sciences for the Ford Foundation in Brazil, and associate director of the Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin. His principal research interests are comparative urbanization and international migration. He is currently conducting a longitudinal study of 1980 Cuban (Marie!) refugees and Haitian boat people in South Florida and a

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327 comparative project on the urban informal sector in two South American capital cities. JACK ROSENTHAL is deputy editorial page editor of The New York Times. He graduated from Harvard College, served as a senior aide in the Department of Justice and the Department of State, spent a year at Harvard's Institute of Politics as a fellow, served as principal author of the Kerner Commission report on urban disorders, and won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 1982. He has written about immigration since college, inside and outside the government. He is an immigrant. MARK R. ROSENZWEIG is professor of economics at the University of Minnesota. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University. During 1979-1980 he was a research director of the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. He is currently working on a monograph on U.S. immigration using Census Bureau, INS, and World Bank data and on studies of the determinants and consequences of child health, fertility, family structure, and public health programs in developed and developing countries. TERESA A. SULLIVAN is associate professor of sociology and training director of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. She received a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. She is a demographer with interests in labor force, immigration, and minority groups. She is also a member of the National Research Council's Panel on Technology and Women's Employment. MARTA TIENDA is professor of rural sociology and affiliate of the Center for Demography and Ecology and the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin. She is principal investigator of a research project on the labor market and program participation of Hispanic immigrants and Southeast Asian refugees. Her expertise is in economic sociology, demography, international development and immigration. She is a member of the board of directors of the Population Association of America and the Census Advisory Committee on Population Statistics (1979-1985~. She received a B.A. in Spanish literature from Michigan State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin. JAMES TRUSSELL is professor of economics and public affairs and faculty associate in the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. His principal research interests are demographic methods, fertility, and family planning, and he has published research papers in all three areas. He is a member of the Population Association of America and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He received a B.S. in mathematics from Davidson College, a B.Phil. from Oxford University in economics, and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. KENNETH W. WACHTER is associate professor of demography and statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. Author of a major work on statistical studies of historical social structure, he also works in the areas of multivariate statistical analysis, mathematical population

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328 studies, demographic simulation, and kinship forecasting. An expert witness in the suit over the 1980 U.S. census, he serves as a member of the National Science Foundation's Review Panel on Measurement Methods and Data Improvement, as a member of the Scientific Committee on Family and Life Cycle Demography of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, and as research associate of the National Bureau for Economic Research. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from Cambridge University. ROBERT WARREN, who served as research associate for the study, is now a demographer with the Statistical Analysis Branch of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. At the time of the study, he was on leave to the panel from the Bureau of the Census. His research interests have focused on the evaluation of decennial census coverage and the development of methodology to estimate emigration and undocumented immigration. He is the coauthor of a pathfinding report on estimating the number of illegal aliens counted in the 1980 decennial census. He has an M.S. from Indiana University.