Appendix D
Biographical Sketches

C. Herb Ward (chair) is the Foyt family chair of engineering at Rice University, where he directs the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute. Dr. Ward also directs the Department of Defense Advanced Applied Technology Demonstration Facility, and for the past 15 years, he has directed the activities of the National Center for Ground-Water Research. In addition, Dr. Ward serves as co-director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-sponsored Hazardous Substances Research Center/South & Southwest. His research interests include the microbial ecology of hazardous waste sites, biodegradation by natural microbial populations, microbial processes for aquifer restoration, and microbial transport and fate. Dr. Ward is also an expert on the technical issues surrounding cleanup of the nation's nuclear weapons complex. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Environmental Management Technologies (CEMT). Dr. Ward received his Ph.D. in plant pathology, genetics, and physiology from Cornell University and an M.P.H. in environmental health from the University of Texas.

Barry Bozeman is the director of the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he specializes in science and technology policy, focusing on research and development impact evaluation, technology transfer, and commercialization. Dr. Bozeman is an expert on the use of peer review to evaluate the impacts of research and development. His work on peer review has included a state-of-the-art review paper titled ''Peer Review and Evaluation of R&D Impacts'' (in Evaluating R&D Impacts: Methods and Practice, Bozeman and Melkers, 1993), as well as studies on peer review for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Air Force. He has served on the NRC's Committee to Address Continued Review of the Tax System's Modernization of the Internal Revenue Service. Dr. Bozeman received his Ph.D. in Political Science/Public Administration from the Ohio State University.

Radford Byerly, Jr. recently retired as vice-president for public policy of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research after a distinguished career in academia and government, specializing in science management and policy. Among his many positions, Dr. Byerly has worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST; then the National Bureau of Standards) in the environmental measurement and fire research programs; has served as chief of staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology; and was director of the University of Colorado's Center for Space and Geosciences Policy. He currently serves as a member of NASA's Space Science Advisory Committee and serves on National Science Foundation site visit committees and review panels. Dr. Byerly is a member of the NRC's Board on Assessment of NIST. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Rice University.

Linda Capuano is the vice-president of technology and new business development at AlliedSignal Aerospace. In this capacity, Dr. Capuano is responsible for restructuring the company's review process for selecting research and development programs. Prior to joining



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--> Appendix D Biographical Sketches C. Herb Ward (chair) is the Foyt family chair of engineering at Rice University, where he directs the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute. Dr. Ward also directs the Department of Defense Advanced Applied Technology Demonstration Facility, and for the past 15 years, he has directed the activities of the National Center for Ground-Water Research. In addition, Dr. Ward serves as co-director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-sponsored Hazardous Substances Research Center/South & Southwest. His research interests include the microbial ecology of hazardous waste sites, biodegradation by natural microbial populations, microbial processes for aquifer restoration, and microbial transport and fate. Dr. Ward is also an expert on the technical issues surrounding cleanup of the nation's nuclear weapons complex. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Environmental Management Technologies (CEMT). Dr. Ward received his Ph.D. in plant pathology, genetics, and physiology from Cornell University and an M.P.H. in environmental health from the University of Texas. Barry Bozeman is the director of the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he specializes in science and technology policy, focusing on research and development impact evaluation, technology transfer, and commercialization. Dr. Bozeman is an expert on the use of peer review to evaluate the impacts of research and development. His work on peer review has included a state-of-the-art review paper titled ''Peer Review and Evaluation of R&D Impacts'' (in Evaluating R&D Impacts: Methods and Practice, Bozeman and Melkers, 1993), as well as studies on peer review for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Air Force. He has served on the NRC's Committee to Address Continued Review of the Tax System's Modernization of the Internal Revenue Service. Dr. Bozeman received his Ph.D. in Political Science/Public Administration from the Ohio State University. Radford Byerly, Jr. recently retired as vice-president for public policy of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research after a distinguished career in academia and government, specializing in science management and policy. Among his many positions, Dr. Byerly has worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST; then the National Bureau of Standards) in the environmental measurement and fire research programs; has served as chief of staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology; and was director of the University of Colorado's Center for Space and Geosciences Policy. He currently serves as a member of NASA's Space Science Advisory Committee and serves on National Science Foundation site visit committees and review panels. Dr. Byerly is a member of the NRC's Board on Assessment of NIST. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Rice University. Linda Capuano is the vice-president of technology and new business development at AlliedSignal Aerospace. In this capacity, Dr. Capuano is responsible for restructuring the company's review process for selecting research and development programs. Prior to joining

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--> AlliedSignal, she worked as vice-president of business development at Conductus, and she held a number of engineering and management positions at IBM. Dr. Capuano also served on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Task Force on Alternative Futures for the DOE National Laboratories ("Galvin Task Force"), which explored the relevance of national laboratory research, including the role of peer review in research at the DOE's national laboratories. Dr. Capuano received her Ph.D. in materials science from Stanford University. Richard Conway is a recently retired senior corporate fellow at Union Carbide Corporation. His areas of expertise include contaminated site remediation, hazardous waste management, and environmental risk analysis of chemical products. Mr. Conway was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986 for his contributions to environmental engineering and for the development of improved treatment processes for industrial wastes. He has received many awards and honors, including the Hering Medal, Gascoigne Medal, Dudley Medal, Rudolfs Medal, and honors from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Water Environment Federation, and the American Society for Testing and Materials. Mr. Conway has been involved in numerous NRC activities, including the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Water Science and Technology Board, and the Committee on Peer Review of Department of Defense Environmental Scholarships and Grants, and the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. He earned his M.S. in environmental engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Thomas Cotton is vice-president of JK Research Associates, Inc., where he is a principal in activities related to radioactive waste management policy and strategic planning. Before joining JK Research Associates, he dealt with energy policy and radioactive waste management issues as an analyst and project director during 11 years with the U.S. Congress's Office of Technology Assessment. His expertise is in public policy analysis, nuclear waste management, and strategic planning. Dr. Cotton has served the NRC as a member of the CEMT and the Committee on the Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes. He received a Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems from Stanford University. Frank Crimi recently retired as vice-president for Lockheed Martin's Advanced Environmental Systems Company. He joined Lockheed in 1992 after completing 34 years in engineering and management positions with the General Electric Company. Mr. Crimi has over 30 years in design, operations, and maintenance of DOE naval nuclear power plants with special emphasis in decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. He was the General Electric project manager for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station decommissioning and recently chaired the Long Island Power Authority's Independent Review Panel during the decommissioning of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. Mr. Crimi was a member of Public Service of Colorado's Management Oversight Committee for the Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station decommissioning. He currently is on advisory boards for the decommissioning of the Trojan and Connecticut Yankee Nuclear Power Plants. Mr. Crimi completed a B.S. in mechanical engineering at Ohio University in Athens and did graduate studies in mechanical engineering at Union College, Schenectady, New York. John Fountain is a professor of geochemistry at the State University of New York at Buffalo. His research focuses on various aspects of contaminant hydrology, including aquifer

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--> remediation and the characterization of fractured rock aquifers. Dr. Fountain is a member of the NRC's Committee on Technologies for Cleanup of Subsurface Contaminants in the DOE Weapons Complex. He received his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. David T. Kingsbury is the vice-president and chief information officer at Chiron Corporation. He recently resigned as director of the Division of Biomedical Information Sciences and chief information officer of the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include computational biology and databases, molecular diagnostic techniques in medical microbiology, and the biochemistry and mechanisms of pathogenesis of the slow (unconventional) viruses. Dr. Kingsbury is an expert on the administration of peer reviews, having served for four years as assistant director for Biological, Behavioral, and Social Sciences at the National Science Foundation. He also serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Computational Biology and is North American editor of the Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology. Dr. Kingsbury received his Ph.D. in biology at the University of California, San Diego. Gareth Thomas is a professor in the Graduate School of the Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a renowned expert in the theory and application of electron diffraction and high-resolution microscopy to problems in materials science and engineering. Dr. Thomas is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. In addition to holding a variety of positions at Berkeley, he also has held positions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where he founded the National Center for Electron Microscopy. Dr. Thomas has been involved in peer reviews for a variety of scientific societies and scholarly journals, and he currently is serving as editor-in-chief for the journal Acta/Scripta Materialia. He has served on the NRC Committee on Materials Research Opportunities and Needs in Materials Science and Engineering. Dr. Thomas received his Ph.D. and Sc.D. from Cambridge University.

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