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B— Committee Biographies

Richard Deriso earned his Ph.D. in biomathematics from the University of Washington in 1978. He is cochair of the Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods. Dr. Deriso is the chief scientist of the Tuna-Billfish Program of the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. He also serves as adjunct associate professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and affiliate associate professor of fisheries at the University of Washington. Dr. Deriso served on the Ocean Studies Board (OSB) Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. His major research interests are in the areas of fisheries population dynamics, quantitative ecology, stock assessment, applied mathematics, and statistics.

Terrance Quinn earned a Ph.D. in biomathematics from the University of Washington in 1980. He is cochair of the Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods. Dr. Quinn has been an associate professor at the University of Alaska since 1985. He is a member of the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council and has recently served as consultant to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Makah Indian Tribe in Neah Bay, Washington. Dr. Quinn also served on the OSB Committee on Fisheries and Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna and was appointed to the OSB in 1995. His research interests are in the areas of fish population dynamics and management, applied statistics, and biometrics.

Jeremy Collie earned his Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography in 1985. Dr. Collie serves as associate professor of oceanography at the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island. His research interests include quantitative ecology with emphasis on population dynamics and production of marine animals, fish population dynamics and management, fish feeding and prey selection, predator-prey interactions, and recruitment of marine fish.

Ray Hilborn earned his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of British Columbia in 1974. Dr. Hilborn is professor at the School of Fisheries of the University of Washington. His main areas of research are resource management, population dynamics, systems analysis, and fisheries.

Cynthia Jones earned her Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1984. She is associate professor in the Department of Biology at Old Dominion University. Dr. Jones' main areas of research are fisheries and population ecology.



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--> B— Committee Biographies Richard Deriso earned his Ph.D. in biomathematics from the University of Washington in 1978. He is cochair of the Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods. Dr. Deriso is the chief scientist of the Tuna-Billfish Program of the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. He also serves as adjunct associate professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and affiliate associate professor of fisheries at the University of Washington. Dr. Deriso served on the Ocean Studies Board (OSB) Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. His major research interests are in the areas of fisheries population dynamics, quantitative ecology, stock assessment, applied mathematics, and statistics. Terrance Quinn earned a Ph.D. in biomathematics from the University of Washington in 1980. He is cochair of the Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods. Dr. Quinn has been an associate professor at the University of Alaska since 1985. He is a member of the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council and has recently served as consultant to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Makah Indian Tribe in Neah Bay, Washington. Dr. Quinn also served on the OSB Committee on Fisheries and Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna and was appointed to the OSB in 1995. His research interests are in the areas of fish population dynamics and management, applied statistics, and biometrics. Jeremy Collie earned his Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography in 1985. Dr. Collie serves as associate professor of oceanography at the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island. His research interests include quantitative ecology with emphasis on population dynamics and production of marine animals, fish population dynamics and management, fish feeding and prey selection, predator-prey interactions, and recruitment of marine fish. Ray Hilborn earned his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of British Columbia in 1974. Dr. Hilborn is professor at the School of Fisheries of the University of Washington. His main areas of research are resource management, population dynamics, systems analysis, and fisheries. Cynthia Jones earned her Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1984. She is associate professor in the Department of Biology at Old Dominion University. Dr. Jones' main areas of research are fisheries and population ecology.

OCR for page 133
--> Bruce Lindsay earned his Ph.D. in biomathematics from the University of Washington in 1978. He is professor of statistics at Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on statistical methods in semiparametric models, with emphasis on maximum likelihood and minimum distance methods in mixture models and computation. Ana Parma earned her Ph.D. in fisheries from the University of Washington in 1988. She is currently a population dynamicist for the International Pacific Halibut Commission. Her research focuses on population dynamics and adaptive fisheries management. Saul Saila earned a Ph.D. in fishery biology from Cornell University in 1952. Dr. Saila recently retired from his position as professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island, where he had been employed since 1956. Dr. Saila served on the OSB Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. His research focused on the area of fish population dynamics. Lynda Shapiro earned her Ph.D. from Duke University. She is professor of biology at the University of Oregon and director of the university's Institute of Marine Biology. She is a commissioner of the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, serves on the executive committee of the National Association of Marine Laboratories, and holds a number of other board and committee positions with various professional and academic organizations. Dr. Shapiro served on the OSB Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, the Committee on the Arctic Research Vessel, and the Ocean Studies Board. Her research focuses on marine phytoplankton ecology. Stephen J. Smith earned an M.Sc. degree in statistics from the University of Guelph, Canada, in 1979. He is a research scientist for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography. Mr. Smith has served as chairperson of the Statistics, Sampling and Surveys Subcommittee of the Canadian Atlantic Fisheries Scientific Advisory Committee. Additionally, he has served on the editorial board of the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science and on the board of directors of the Statistical Society of Canada as Atlantic Provinces representative, as well as being a member of a number of the society's committees. Currently, Mr. Smith is assistant editor of the ICES Journal of Marine Science. His primary research interests are in the field of resource management and modeling of marine fisheries, with a concentration in statistics. Carl Walters earned a Ph.D. in fisheries from Colorado State University in 1969. Dr. Walters is professor of zoology and animal resource ecology at the University of British Columbia. His areas of research include the dynamics of ecological communities, application of mathematical models and computer simulation techniques to problems in resource ecology, and adaptive management of renewable resources.