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Appendix D:
Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Workshop Participants

Steering Committee Members

JACK M. WILSON, RENSSALAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

Jack Wilson is the Acting Dean of the Faculty; Dean, Undergraduate and Continuing Education; Professor of Physics and Professor of Engineering Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and Chairman of the Board of Interactive Learning International (ILINC). Dr. Wilson received his A.B. from Thiel College in 1967, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Kent State University in 1972. After holding teaching and research positions at Kent State, Sam Houston State, and the University of Maryland among others, he has been with Rensselaer since 1990. Among the many awards he has won, Dr. Wilson received the Pew Charitable Trusts Leadership Award for Renewal of Undergraduate Education in 1996. Dr. Wilson has published numerous papers, the most recent of which is “Re-engineering the Undergraduate Curriculum," a book chapter for The Learning Revolution to be published by Anker Publishing Co., 1997.

DENICE D. DENTON, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

Denice D. Denton is the Dean of Engineering and a professor in the department of electrical engineering at the University of Washington. She received the B.S., M.S. (1982), and Ph.D. (1987) in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her current interests include plasma deposition of polymers and the use of micromachining in solid state actuator design. Professor Denton was codirector of the National Institute for Science Education in 1995-1996. She is the recipient of the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award (1987-1992), the American Society of Engineering Education AT&T Foundation Teaching Award (1991), the W.M. Keck Foundation Engineering Teaching Excellence Award (1994), the American Society of Electrical Engineers George Westinghouse Award (1995), and the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineering Harriet B. Rigas Teaching Award (1995). Dr. Denton is the chair of the NRC's Board on Engineering Education,

JAMES W. SERUM, HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY

Jim Serum received a B.A. in chemistry from Hope College and was awarded a Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1969 from the University of Colorado. His doctorate research was directed toward studies in mass spectrometry. Following his graduate studies, he taught and did research at the University of Ghent, Belgium. He spent a year at Rice University as a Welch Fellow, and then joined the staff at Cornell University as director of the National Institutes of Health High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Facility. Dr. Serum joined the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1973 as applications chemist for mass spectrometry. Since then he has held a number of management positions, including technical support manager for mass spectrometry in Europe (France); marketing manager for mass spectrometry and spectroscopy at the Scientific Instruments Division; research and development manager at the same division; and research and development manager for the Avondale Division (laboratory automation and chromatography instrumentation). Since 1984 he has held positions as operations manager for laboratory automation systems and automated chemical systems, as well as the analytical group research and development manager. Dr. Serum is currently general manager for mass spectrometry, infrared, and protein chemical systems. In addition, he is chairman of Hewlett-Packard's Bioscience Council and vice chairman of the Hewlett-Packard Corporate Research and Development Council.



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--> Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Workshop Participants Steering Committee Members JACK M. WILSON, RENSSALAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE Jack Wilson is the Acting Dean of the Faculty; Dean, Undergraduate and Continuing Education; Professor of Physics and Professor of Engineering Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and Chairman of the Board of Interactive Learning International (ILINC). Dr. Wilson received his A.B. from Thiel College in 1967, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Kent State University in 1972. After holding teaching and research positions at Kent State, Sam Houston State, and the University of Maryland among others, he has been with Rensselaer since 1990. Among the many awards he has won, Dr. Wilson received the Pew Charitable Trusts Leadership Award for Renewal of Undergraduate Education in 1996. Dr. Wilson has published numerous papers, the most recent of which is “Re-engineering the Undergraduate Curriculum," a book chapter for The Learning Revolution to be published by Anker Publishing Co., 1997. DENICE D. DENTON, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Denice D. Denton is the Dean of Engineering and a professor in the department of electrical engineering at the University of Washington. She received the B.S., M.S. (1982), and Ph.D. (1987) in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her current interests include plasma deposition of polymers and the use of micromachining in solid state actuator design. Professor Denton was codirector of the National Institute for Science Education in 1995-1996. She is the recipient of the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award (1987-1992), the American Society of Engineering Education AT&T Foundation Teaching Award (1991), the W.M. Keck Foundation Engineering Teaching Excellence Award (1994), the American Society of Electrical Engineers George Westinghouse Award (1995), and the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineering Harriet B. Rigas Teaching Award (1995). Dr. Denton is the chair of the NRC's Board on Engineering Education, JAMES W. SERUM, HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY Jim Serum received a B.A. in chemistry from Hope College and was awarded a Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1969 from the University of Colorado. His doctorate research was directed toward studies in mass spectrometry. Following his graduate studies, he taught and did research at the University of Ghent, Belgium. He spent a year at Rice University as a Welch Fellow, and then joined the staff at Cornell University as director of the National Institutes of Health High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Facility. Dr. Serum joined the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1973 as applications chemist for mass spectrometry. Since then he has held a number of management positions, including technical support manager for mass spectrometry in Europe (France); marketing manager for mass spectrometry and spectroscopy at the Scientific Instruments Division; research and development manager at the same division; and research and development manager for the Avondale Division (laboratory automation and chromatography instrumentation). Since 1984 he has held positions as operations manager for laboratory automation systems and automated chemical systems, as well as the analytical group research and development manager. Dr. Serum is currently general manager for mass spectrometry, infrared, and protein chemical systems. In addition, he is chairman of Hewlett-Packard's Bioscience Council and vice chairman of the Hewlett-Packard Corporate Research and Development Council.

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--> HARVEY B. KEYNES, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Harvey Keynes is a professor of mathematics, past director of education in the Geometry Center, and director of education programs for a new Institute of Technology Center. His research interests are in dynamical systems. Professor Keynes has directed the following projects: The University of Minnesota Talented Youth Program (state and private funding); the National Science Foundation Teacher Renewal Project; the NSF-supported Minnesota Mathematics Mobilization; the Ford Foundation Urban Mathematics Collaborative; the NSF-supported Young Scholars Project; the Bush Foundation Project to increase female participation in the University of Minnesota Talented Youth Program; the NSF-funded Early Alert Initiative; and a new reformed calculus program for engineering students. Professor Keynes has also taught calculus in the University of Minnesota Talented Youth Program, and has been a teacher in the NSF Teacher Renewal Project. He has extensive contacts in Minnesota and national mathematics education and high technology committees. He was a member of the NRC's Mathematical Sciences Education Board and is the recipient of the 1992 Award for Distinguished Public Service of the American Mathematical Society. Professor Keynes has contacts with major mathematics organizations and projects at the international level and throughout the United States. Workshop Participants and Authors of Commissioned Papers NABIL R. ADAM, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Nabil Adam is a professor of computers and information systems and the director of the Center for Information Management, Integration, and Connectivity (CIMIC) at Rutgers University and member of the department of computer and information science, New Jersey Institute of Technology. He received his M.S., M. Phil, and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University Dr. Adam has published a number of technical papers in such journals as Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineering (IEEE), Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, and Communications of the ACM, among others. He has co-authored/co-edited nine books including one on database issues in global information systems (GIS) (Kluwer Academic Publisher, 1997), And as part of the Springer Verlag Lecture Notes Series in Computer Science, one on electronic commerce (1996), two on digital libraries (1995, 1996) and one on advanced databases (1993). Dr. Adam is editor-in-chief of the International Journal on Digital Libraries and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Management Information Systems and the Journal of Electronic Commerce. He served as a guest editor for the Communications of the ACM, Operations Research , and Journal of Management Information Systems. He is the co-founder and current chair of the IEEE task force on digital libraries. He served as the general chair of the 1997 "IEEE International Conference on the Advances in Digital Libraries (IEEE ADL'97)", the program chair of the 1996 "Forum on Research and Technology Advances in Digital Libraries", the previous year as program co-chair, and the program chair of the 1994 "International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management.” He has also served on the program committee of several international conferences. Dr. Adam has lectured on digital libraries and other related topics at several institutions, including the department of computer science, State University of New York at Buffalo (April 1997); The International Conference on the Digital Libraries and Information Services for the 21st Century (KOLISS DL'96), in Seoul, Korea, (September 1996); the Development and Practice of Law in the Age of the Internet, Washington College of Law Centennial Week Symposium (April 1996); and the 2nd International Workshop on Next Generation Info. Technologies and Systems, the Technion and Neaman Institute, Israel (June 1995). His research work has been supported by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the NASA Center for Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences (CESDIS), and Bellcore. He also serves as a consultant to several organizations, including Bellcore, and Center for Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He is a member of the New York Academy of Science and listed in Who's Who in America in Science and Engineering.

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--> PRUDENCE ADLER, ASSOCIATION OF RESEARCH LIBRARIES Prudence Adler is the assistant executive director of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Her responsibilities include federal relations with a focus on information policies, intellectual property rights, telecommunications, issues relating to access to government information, and project management for the ARL GIS Literacy Project. Prior to joining ARL in 1989, Ms. Adler was assistant project director, Communications and Information Technologies Program, Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where she worked on studies relating to government information, networking and supercomputer issues, and information technologies and education. Ms. Adler has an M.S. in library science and M.A. in American history from the Catholic University of America and a B.A. in history from George Washington University. She has participated in several advisory councils including the Depository Library Council, the Board of Directors of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, and the Alexandria Digital Library Design Review. TRYG AGER, IBM ALMADEN RESEARCH CENTER Tryg Ager is the lead of Digital Library Pilots and Prototypes projects at Almaden Research Center. Recent projects include university journal libraries, integration of automated library systems with digital library, countrywide digital library systems, and digital libraries for training and analysis for the Department of Defense. Prior to joining IBM in 1994, Tryg was a consultant for the Institute for Defense Analysis and helped plan and implement worldwide multimedia networking for the Department of Defense Dependents Schools. From 1978 to 1994 Tryg was a senior research scientist at the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences at Stanford University, working on many projects to create, test, and disseminate programs for computer-based instruction in logic and mathematics. WILLIAM ARMS, CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL RESEARCH INITIATIVES Bill Arms has been a member of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) since 1995. He leads CNRI's program of research and development in digital libraries. This includes publication of D-Lib Magazine; technology development, including a handle system for identifying Interact resources, and repository and registry systems; and implementation projects with the U.S. Copyright Office, the Library of Congress, the Defense Technical Information Center, the Association of American Publishers, the United States Information Agency, and others. Previously, Dr. Arms was vice president for computing at Carnegie Mellon University, and has held faculty positions at Sussex University, the Open University, and Dartmouth College. He has been a member of numerous boards and committees in the field of networking, digital libraries, including chairman of the Educom board, a founder of the Coalition for Networked Information, and is currently vice chairman of the Association of Computing Machinery publications board. Dr. Arms has degrees in mathematics and operational research from Oxford University, the London School of Economics, and Sussex University. TORA BIKSON, RAND CORPORATION Tora Bikson is a senior scientist in RAND Corporation's Behavioral Sciences Department. She received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. (1969) degrees in philosophy from the University of Missouri at Columbia and M.A. and Ph.D. (1974) degrees in psychology from the University of California at Los Angeles. Since 1980, Dr. Bikson's research has investigated properties of advanced information technologies in varied user contexts, addressing such issues as what factors affect the successful incorporation of innovative tools into ongoing activities; how these new work media influence group structures and interaction processes; what impact they have on task and social outcomes as well as user satisfaction; and what individuals and organizations need to know to use them effectively. She has pursued these questions as principal investigator for projects funded by NSF, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the John and Mary R. Markle Foundation. Her work emphasizes field research design, intensive case studies, and large-scale cross-sectional studies addressed to the use of computer-based tools in organizational settings. Dr. Bikson is a member of Data for Development (a United Nation's Secretariat providing scientific guidance on the use of information systems in developing companies) and a technical consultant to the U.N. Advisory Commission on the Coordination of Information Systems.

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--> She is a frequent reviewer for professional papers and has authored a number of journal articles, book chapters, and research reports on the implementation of new interactive media. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Association for Computing Machinery, American Psychological Association (fellow), Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility, and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. Dr. Bikson recently served on the NRC's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board committee on information technology and the service society. *HAROLD BILLINGS, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Harold Billings is director of General Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin, a position he has held since 1977. Prior to that appointment he held other administrative positions at UT Austin in the areas of general administration, collection development and technical services. He holds a B.A. degree from Pan American College (now UT Pan American) and the M.L.S. from UT Austin. He was the founding chairman of the Research Libraries Advisory Committee to OCLC (RLAC) and has served on the boards of the Association of Research Libraries, the AMIGOS Bibliographic Council, and the Center for Research Libraries, and has participated in numerous other groups concerned with resource sharing, networking, and preservation. He is the author or editor of works dealing with contemporary literature and bibliography, as well as articles about library cooperation and the electronic information revolution. CHRISTINE L. BORGMAN, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES Christine Borgman holds the Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA. She is a professor of library and information science, and was department chair from 1995 to 1997. She also teaches in the Communication Studies Program at UCLA and is a visiting professor in the Department of Information and Library Studies at Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, England (1996-1999). Her teaching and research interests include digital libraries, human-computer interaction, information seeking behavior, and scholarly communication and bibliometrics, as well as information technology policy in Central and Eastern Europe. Since 1990 she has lectured or conducted research in Australia, Austria, Britain, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Hungary, Ireland, Lithuania, New Zealand, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, and the Ukraine, and has been a Fulbright Visiting Professor at the University of Economic Sciences and at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary, and a scholar-in-residence at the Rockefeller Foundation Study and Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy. Her educational background includes a B.A. in mathematics from Michigan State University, an M.L.S. from the University of Pittsburgh, and a Ph.D. in communication from Stanford University. Prior to her research career, she was a systems analyst, developing automated systems for libraries and information retrieval systems for industry. Professor Borgman has published more than 130 articles, conference papers, reports, and books in the fields of information studies, computer science, and communication. Her books include Effective On line Searching: A Basic Text (Marcel Dekker, 1984), Scholarly Communication and Bibliometrics (Sage, 1990), and From Gutenberg to the Global Information Infrastructure (MIT Press, forthcoming). She is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the board of directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources, the advisory board to the Soros Foundation Open Society Institute Regional Library Program, the advisory board to the Electronic Privacy Information Center, and the Association for Computing Machinery Public Policy Committee. She currently serves on the editorial boards of Communication Research, Journal of the American Society for Information Science, Journal of Documentation, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, The Information Society, and the Journal of Digital Information. ANNE M. BUCK, CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Anne Buck is the Caltech University Librarian. Before coming to Pasadena she was university librarian at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. She was a group supervisor in the Bell Labs Library Network until the breakup of AT&T when she joined Bell Com- *   Authors of commissioned papers who did not attend the workshop

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--> munications Research to build and direct the Bellcore Library Network. She has also been a public library director, consultant, and trustee. Dr. Buck taught library management at Rutgers University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and recently contributed chapters to Professional Writing and The Complete Chemical Engineer; A Student Guide to Critical Thinking. Dr. Buck is vice-president of the Engineering Information Foundation, a director of Engineering Information, Incorporated and a member of the Highsmith Press Editorial Advisory Board. She has served as treasurer of the American Society for Information Science and is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in American Education and Who's Who in the West. JAMES CALLAN, UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Jamie Callan is a research assistant professor in the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Computer Science Department. He is also the assistant director of the UMass Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval (CIIR). He is responsible for obtaining grants, directing graduate student research, advising students and serving on thesis committees, publishing, and teaching. He also helps manage the CIIR's full-time software engineering staff, and its highly successful technology transfer program. Dr. Callan has published papers on a variety of topics in information retrieval, machine learning, and case-based reasoning; he serves on the program committee of the Special Interest Group Information Retrieval (SIGIR) and Text Retrieval Conferences (TREC); and he is the program chair of the 1997 SIGIR workshop on Networked Information Retrieval. He has recently worked on the problem of applying digital library techniques to improve K-12 education. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Callan worked at Digital Equipment Corporation for seven years. He holds a B.A. from the University of Connecticut, Storrs, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. MARY M. CASE, ASSOCIATION OF RESEARCH LIBRARIES Mary Case is director of the Office of Scholarly Communication of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The Office of Scholarly Communication undertakes activities to understand and influence the forces affecting the production, dissemination, and use of scholarly and scientific information. The office seeks to promote innovative, creative, and alternative ways of sharing scholarly findings, particularly through championing evolving electronic techniques for recording and disseminating academic and research scholarship. Before coming to ARL in June 1996, Ms. Case was director of program review in the Office of the Vice President for Administration and Planning at Northwestern University. Prior to that, she was head of Serials and Acquisitions Services at the Northwestern University Library. SU-SHING CHEN, UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA Su-Shing Chen received his PhD from the University of Maryland in 1970, and was with the University of Florida until 1985. He then joined the University of North Carolina-Charlotte where he served as the chairman of computer science from 1986-89. Dr. Chen became a professor and chair of computer engineering and computer science of the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1996. He has been a visiting professor at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (1996), University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (1990), University of Bonn/Germany (1980), IMPA/Brazil (1980), University of Maryland (1979), and Georgia Tech (1978). He has also been a visiting scientist at IBM Thomas Watson Research Center (1982), IBM Palo Alto Scientific Center (1986), Boeing High Tech Center (1988), and other IBM divisions (1981). He also has served as program director of various research programs at National Science Foundation, such as the program director of geometric analysis (1983-84), program director of intelligent systems (1994-95), program director of knowledge models and cognitive systems (1994-95). From May 1994-August 1995, he was the program director of information technology and organizations. During that period, he was responsible for the establishment of the NSF/ARPA/NASA Research on Digital Libraries Initiative, and was the program director of the initiative. JAMES DAVIS, PALO ALTO RESEARCH CENTER/XEROX Jim Davis of Xerox at the Palo Alto Research Center has been working on digital libraries since 1992. He is the original architect of a distributed digital

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--> library for computer science technical reports (NCSTRL) which is now in use at 92 institutions worldwide. This same technology is being considered as the basis for an Association for Computing Machinery electronic papers repository for computer science. He also designed CoNote, which provides small groups shared annotation of Web documents, and is now used routinely in CS instruction at Cornell. Dr. Davis received a B.S. and Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His graduate work at the Media Lab was in spoken language interaction and computer music. ELIZABETH DUPUIS, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Beth Dupuis is head of the Digital Information Literacy Office, within the Undergraduate Library of the General Libraries, at The University of Texas at Austin. One of her primary responsibilities is to work with faculty, librarians, and students to determine core skills and competencies related to searching, evaluating, saving, manipulating, and organizing information. In her classes, she has taught thousands of undergraduate and graduate students to learn to effectively use core information resources and systems with an emphasis on digital formats and basic skills. Previously she managed the Balcones Library Service Center, a remote library for science and technology-related agencies of approximately 1500 researchers affiliated with The University of Texas at Austin. Ms. Dupuis has published numerous articles and offered conference presentations about digital information and instructional technologies. On campus, she serves on the Multimedia Instruction Committee and the Team Web Planning and Training Group. Currently she is the web administrator and listserv moderator for the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Instruction Section and will soon begin her responsibilities as associate editor for columns of Public-Access Computer Systems Review (PACS-R), an electronic journal about end-user computer systems in libraries. Ms. Dupuis received a B.A. in English and a Masters in library and information science (MLIS) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; she holds an Endorsement of Specialization in Special Libraries and Resources from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin. *STEPHEN C. EHRMANN, AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR HIGHER EDUCATION Stephen Ehrmann serves as director of the Flashlight Project at the American Association for Higher Education. Flashlight develops and applies evaluation tools to issues arising from the uses of technology in education. Dr. Ehrmann also is part of the technology projects group that supports the national Teaching, Learning and Technology Roundtable program. His wide ranging experience also includes work on distance education, the economics of courseware, and strategies for employing technology in curricular reform. For eleven years (1985-96) Dr. Ehrmann was senior program officer for interactive technologies with the Annenberg/CPB Projects at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in Washington, DC. From 1991-94, Dr. Ehrmann also served as senior program officer with the Annenberg/CPB Math and Science Project, an initiative dedicated to improving the teaching of math and science in the public schools. From 1978-85, he was a program officer with the Fund for the Improvement of Post-secondary Education (FIPSE). Prior to that, he served as director of educational research and assistance at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His Ph.D. is in management and higher education from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he also received bachelors degrees in aerospace engineering and in urban planning. EDWARD A. FOX, VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE Ed Fox holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in computer science from Cornell University, and a B.S. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since 1983 he has been at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VA Tech or VPI&SU), where he serves as associate director for research at the computing center and professor of computer science. He directs the Information Access Lab, the Digital Library Research Lab, “Interactive Learning with a Digital Library in Computer Science," "Improving Graduate Education with a National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations," and a number of other research and development projects. In addition to his courses at Virginia Tech, Dr. Fox has taught more than 25 tutorials in nine countries. For the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), he served in 1988-91 as a mem-

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--> ber of the publications board and as editor-in-chief of ACM Press Database Products (responsible for the broad area of electronic publishing including online, CD-ROM, hypertext, interactive multimedia, and developing an electronic library). He also served from 1987-95 as vice chair and then chair of the special interest group on information retrieval, and from 1992-94 as founder and chairman of the steering committee for the ACM Multimedia series of conferences. He serves as chair of the steering committee for the ACM Digital Libraries series of conferences was program chair for ACM DL'96, and is a member of the editorial board for ACM/Springer Journal on Multimedia Systems . He was project director for the Virginia Disc series of CD-ROMs as well as for VPI&SU work on interactive digital video. He is editor for Morgan Kaufmann Publishers book series on Multimedia Information and Systems. He also serves on the editorial boards of CD-ROM Professional, Electronic Publishing (Origination, Dissemination and Design), Information Processing and Management, Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, Journal of Universal Computer Science, and Multimedia Tools and Applications. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications in the areas of digital libraries, information storage and retrieval, hypertext/hypermedia/multimedia, computational linguistics, CD-ROM and optical disc technology, electronic publishing, and expert systems. GORDON FREEDMAN, CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, MONTEREY BAY Gordon Freedman serves as director for business development at California State University, Monterey Bay, in the university's Center for Science, Technology, and Information Resources. At this new university, funded in part by base conversion funding and devoted to distributed education, Mr. Freedman develops businesses and strategies that bring together knowledge management, learning systems, and appropriate technologies. The university focuses on key relationships in Silicon Valley and Los Angeles to create 21st century learning and knowledge businesses. At a demonstration level, Mr. Freedman designs, develops, and produces interactive, distributed, and media-rich products that fit into the university's strategic mission. Mr. Freedman is the overall designer and producer of the National Science Foundation-funded Virtual Canyon project, which utilizes the deep sea content and methods of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute for a K-12 learning system prototype. He developed and supervises hyper design technologies (hdt.net), a university-affiliated private business that develops technology and media-driven knowledge and learning systems. Mr. Freedman coordinates the development of online learning tools with the university and Silicon Graphics, Inc (SGI) and is the operator at Cal State, Monterey Bay of SGI's Authorized Training Partner program. He is part of a start-up university-affiliated business which will be a value-added supplier of distance learning utilities. Mr. Freedman has a background in government, news media, entertainment, software development and publishing. He spent five years on Capitol Hill as a researcher and investigator, including service on the Senate Watergate Committee. Mr. Freedman was a producer for ABC News, 20/20, and Nightline in Washington, D.C., a producer of television drama and feature films in Los Angeles, including the documentary adaptation of Stephen Hawkings best selling book, A Brief History of Time, and a developer of CD-ROMs. Before coming to the business development post at Cal State, Monterey Bay, he served as a founding vice president of electronic media at Knowledge Exchange, a multiple media publishing company in business, finance, and economies funded by Michael Milken. Mr. Freedman has co-authored two books and. packaged two books. He attended Michigan State University where he studied communication theory. RICHARD FURUTA, TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY Richard Futura is an associate professor at Texas A&M University in the department of computer science, director of the Hypermedia Research Laboratory, and associate director of the Center for the Study of Digital Libraries. Dr. Furuta's current areas of research include hypermedia systems and models, structured documents and electronic publishing, document structure recognition from bitmapped sources, management systems for three-dimensional-gesture-based user interfaces, and digital libraries. He also has studied applications in computer supported cooperative work, software engineering, and visual programming. He is U.S. editor of the journal Electronic Publishing: Origination, Dissemination, and Design (EP-odd), published by John Wiley, and has just completed a term as chair of the ACM Spe-

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--> cial Interest Group on Hypertext (SIGLINK). He was the conference chair for Digital Libraries '94, the first conference in a new series and the program chair for the next in the series, Digital Libraries '95. Dr. Furuta received the B.A. degree from Reed College in 1974, the M.S. degree in computer science from the University of Oregon in 1978, and the Ph.D. degree in computer science from the University of Washington in 1986. MARGARET GJERTSEN, NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY Peg Gjertsen is associate director of the Physics Courseware Evaluation Project. Her duties include maintaining all software, computers, and the website, managing the Novell network both for administrative tasks and teaching functions, training staff on computers, researching new software developments for possible inclusion in her work group and in teaching, maintaining a database of all known physics courseware concerned with teaching physics, and managing the publication of the newsletter. She has been involved in this work since 1984. She is a past editor of the review column for Computers in Physics and continues to write the biennial directory of physics courseware for this journal. Mrs. Gjertsen is associate editor of Physics Academic Software. Her responsibilities include helping establish and maintaining editorial standards and insuring the quality of the published software and the associated user's manual. Mrs. Gjertsen is associate director of The Academic Software Library, a manufacturing and distribution project for faculty written software. She is responsible for the software and hardware concerns, the day to day running of the office, the production and distribution of the software, and the financial reports at the end of each month. Mrs. Gjertsen received her BS and MS in chemistry from Carnegie Mellon University in 1967 and 1968, and has studied at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. PETER S. GRAHAM, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Peter Graham is associate university librarian at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Since 1987, he has been in charge of acquisitions, cataloging, and networked information services. For three years he was also associate vice president for information services, with responsibility for the university's academic and administrative computing and networking. He is a member of the governing bodies of the American Library Association, the Bibliographical Society of America, and the Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities. Mr. Graham is a working group leader within the Coalition for Networked Information and has spoken there several times. He is an advisor to the Research Libraries Group (RLG) on matters of digital libraries and preservation. He has published widely on issues of scholarly preservation, digital library requirements, and the necessary changes within research libraries. Mr. Graham has submitted a proposal to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a series of Digital Preservation Archiving Workshops with the aim of getting major players (National Science Foundation projects, Research Library Group, National Digital Libraries Federation, National Archives Information Server, Library of Congress, etc.) together to reach consensus on next steps to be taken in digital archiving. A planning grant has already been offered from the Council on Library and Information Resources. TIMOTHY INGOLDSBY, AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS Tim Ingoldsby is the director of product development for the American Institute of Physics. This position includes responsibility for the development of AIP online journals and AIP's Online Journal Publishing Service, a digital library platform for many publishers of research journals. He was responsible for AIP's pioneering online journal, Applied Physics Letters Online, which became, in January of 1995, the first online full text searchable hyperlinked journal in physics. Prior to assuming his current position in 1993, Mr. Ingoldsby served as AIP's first director of information technology, responsible for upgrading the institute's computing and communications infrastructure. He also led the technology task force that developed the advanced networking and communications capabilities installed into the newly constructed American Center for Physics. Before joining AIP in 1988, Mr. Ingoldsby worked for Grumman Data Systems, Wang Laboratories, and was associate executive officer of the American Association of Physics Teachers (1979-83). He began his career as a classroom teacher of physics and digital electronics.

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--> VICKI JOHNSON, INTERCONNECT TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION Vicki Johnson is the president of Interconnect Technologies Corporation. Interconnect Technologies is a Silicon Valley firm specializing in research and development and application of digital library technologies. Ms. Johnson has led technical teams at AT&T Bell Labs and Stanford University, and was product manager for an international commercial online service. At Interconnect she works closely with clients to set strategic directions and lead implementation teams. She holds an M.B.A. in finance from New York University and an M.S. in computer engineering from Stanford University. *JOHN JUNGCK, BELOIT COLLEGE John Jungck is the Mead Chair of the Sciences at Beloit College and has been involved in biology education reforms for thirty years. Professor Jungck served as president of the Association of Midwestern College Biology Teachers, is the editor of Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teachers, and has been on the editorial boards of both the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology and BioSystems. He has participated in projects for the Pre-Service Preparation of College Biology Teachers and for the development of investigative laboratory exercises with the Commission for Undergraduate Education in the Biological Sciences (CUBS). His awards include: an NSTA-Ohaus Award for Innovations in College Science Teaching, a FIPSE Mina Shaughnessy Scholar Award for developing "new approaches to learning from practice," and a year-long Fulbright Scholar Award as a visiting professor to Thailand (with extensions to Sri Lanka and Egypt). In 1986, with Nils Peterson, he started the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium and became editor of the BioQUEST Library. Dr. Jungck maintains an active research program in mathematical molecular evolution, and the history, philosophy, and social studies of biology. For the past several years he has served on the executive committee of CELS (the Coalition for Education in the Life Sciences) and several national panels devoted to examining college science education. Dr. Jungck received a B.S. and M.S. from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. from the University of Miami. JAMES KELLER, HARVARD UNIVERSITY James Keller is the associate director and a research associate at the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project. His research interests include the commercialization of the Internet and the federal role in information infrastructure development. His publications include Converging Infrastructures: Intelligent Transportation Systems and the NII, MIT Press, 1996 (co-editor with Lewis Branscomb), Public Access to the Internet, MIT Press, 1995 (co-editor with Brian Kahin), Coordinating the Internet, MIT Press, 1997 (co-editor with Brian Kahin), and Investing in Innovation (co-editor with Lewis Branscomb). Prior to joining the Information Infrastructure Project, Mr. Keller was a product planner and member of the Strategic Planning Group at Sprint Data Group, specializing in the evaluation of emerging communications technologies as they related to new business opportunities. Prior to this, Mr. Keller was a member of the Strategic Planning Group at INTELSAT. INTELSAT owns and operates the international satellite communications system. Mr. Keller graduated with honors from the University of Massachusetts, and holds a Masters in Public and Private Management from the Yale School of Organization and Management. DEBORAH KNOX, THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY Deborah Knox is an associate professor of computer science at The College of New Jersey. She is an advocate of the use of hands-on laboratories in support of the CS curriculum and has led two Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education working groups on laboratories for computing courses. She developed the Special Interest Group Computer Science Education Computing Laboratory Repository, a web-based resource center for laboratory materials (http://www.tcnj.edu/~compsci/), and serves as the editor of the site. Dr. Knox received a B.S. in medical technology from Moravian College in 1979, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Iowa State University in 1987. ROBERTA LAMB, CASE WESTERN UNIVERSITY Roberta Lamb has recently joined the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western University as an assistant professor of management

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--> information and decision systems. Previously she managed the development of application technologies and tools for Platinum Software Corporation, a financial software systems integrator, while completing her Ph.D. degree. Dr. Lamb has written about the organizational use of online information resources, and is particularly interested in the use of digital libraries and scholarly communication systems by the corporate sector. She has participated in digital library workshops and planning forums in the United States and Canada. Dr. Lamb received a B.S. in 1987 and an M.S. in 1989 in computer science and engineering from California State University, Fullerton. She received an M.S. in 1994 and her Ph.D. degree in 1997 in information and computer science from the University of California, Irvine. MICHAEL LESK, BELLCORE Michael Lesk is a chief research scientist at Bellcore, and was previously head of the Computer Science Research Department there. He is also visiting professor of computer science at University College London, and is the author of Practical Digital Libraries: Books, Byte and Bucks, published by Morgan Kaufmann in July 1997. However, he is probably best known as the author of Unix utilities such as tbl, lex and uucp. He has BA and PhD degrees from Harvard University (1961 and 1969, respectively). ROBERT L. LICHTER, CAMILLE AND HENRY DREYFUS FOUNDATION Robert Lichter is executive director of the New York City-based Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., the only nationally operating private foundation that exclusively supports the chemical sciences. Since 1946, through its special grant program in the chemical sciences, the Dreyfus Foundation has provided over $30 million for support of chemistry education. Previously, Dr. Lichter was vice provost for research and graduate studies at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, a regional director of grants at Research Corporation, and professor of chemistry at Hunter College of the City University of New York, where he also served as department chair. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Dr. Lichter serves on two American Chemical Society committees, is a member and former chair of the board of governors of the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research, and has chaired the committee on science education of the New York Academy of Sciences. He received an A.B. in chemistry from Harvard University in 1962 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1967. He did postdoctoral work at the Technische Hochscule Braunschweig, Germany, and the California Institute of Technology. RICHARD E. LUCIER, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO Richard Lucier is assistant vice chancellor for Academic Information Management, director of the Center for Knowledge Management, and university librarian at the University of California, San Francisco. His responsibilities include: the management of academic information resources including academic and instructional computing; the university library; and campus-wide policy and planning coordination for information technology in support of education, research, and clinical care. In mid-1995, Mr. Lucier was appointed to lead a University of California planning effort for a digital library which would serve all nine UC campuses. In September 1996, Mr. Lucier began an 18-month, 80% appointment as special assistant for library planning at the UC Office of the President, providing leadership for a university-wide library planning and action initiative whose goals are to: identify organizational, budgetary, and functional changes required to ensure the continued scholarly and economic vitality of UC's libraries; guide library evolution over the next decade; and ensure that immediate actions are taken in support of such changes and evolution. Mr. Lucier holds a B.M. in music and philosophy from the Catholic University of America and an M.L.S. in library science from Rutgers University. He has done extensive graduate work in health policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mr. Lucier was the co-founder and director of the Laboratory for Applied Research in Academic Information at The Johns Hopkins University from 1986-1991, and spearheaded the development of the genome data base and the online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, both in support of the international Human Genome Initiative. The cooriginator of the Knowledge Management Model, he has special interests in scientific and scholarly communication, the development and management of scientific databases, digital publishing, and digital

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--> libraries, and he has published and lectured widely on these topics. CLIFFORD LYNCH, COALITION FOR NETWORKED INFORMATION Clifford Lynch recently became executive director for the Coalition for Networked Information, a joint project of the Association for Research Libraries, CAUSE and Educom focused on the use of information technology and networked information to enhance scholarship and intellectual productivity. Prior to joining CNI, Dr. Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation, where he was responsible for public access systems serving the nine campuses and the intercampus TCP/IP network. Lynch, who holds a PhD in Computer Science from UC Berkeley, is a past president of the American Society for Information Science and a fellow of the AAAS. He is also an adjunct professor at UC Berkeley's School of Information Management and Systems. MIRIAM MASULLO, IBM THOMAS J. WATSON RESEARCH CENTER Miriam Masullo is a research staff member in the Systems Laboratory at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center, the IBM Yorktown Heights Research Laboratory. She came to this position 15 years ago, with a long held personal interest in education and 16 years of experience in both systems analysis and network engineering from the telecommunications industry. Dr. Masullo received a B.A. degree in architecture and English literature from The City College of New York, an M.S. in computer science from the City College of New York, an M. Phil. and a Ph.D. in computer science for her interdisciplinary work with the departments of computer science and educational psychology from The City University of New York. Her most recent research has focused in the area of building digital libraries and infrastructure for education. She has contributed numerous papers and seminars to further the understanding of that topic on a worldwide basis. FRANCIS MIKSA, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Fran Miksa is professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin. His specialty areas are 1) the classification of knowledge and (2) systems of control for information-bearing entities. He participated in the first Digital Library Conference in 1994 sponsored by Texas A&M University where with his colleague, Philip Doty, he presented a paper entitled "Intellectual Realities and the Digital Library." He was local arrangements chair for the second such conference in 1995 in Austin. More recently he has published The Cultural Legacy of the 'Modern Library' for the Future, JELIS 37 (1996): 100-19 and The DDC, the Universe of Knowledge, and the Post-Modern Library (in press, expected summer 1997) on the Dewey Decimal Classification system and the rise of library classification theory in the 20th century. He presented "The Influence of Mathematics on the Classificatory Thought of S. R. Ranganathan" at the recently held 6th International Study Conference on Classification Research (London, 16-18 June 1997). Dr. Miksa earned both Master's and Ph.D. degrees. from the University of Chicago. He was on the faculty of the School of Library and Information Science, Louisiana State University from 1972 to 1984 and has been at The University of Texas since 1984. *JOAN MITCHELL, ON LINE COMPUTER LIBRARY CENTER / FOREST PRESS Joan Mitchell is the editor in chief of the Dewey Decimal System at the On line Computer Library Center. BRANDON MURAMATSU, NATIONAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION DELIVERY SYSTEM Brandon Muramatsu is the project manager for the National Engineering Education Delivery System (NEEDS) with the Synthesis Coalition, an NSF-funded engineering education coalition. Mr. Muramatsu is responsible for building a World Wide Web accessible database of engineering education courseware (www.needs.org). NEEDS locates, catalogs, and stores engineering and engineering-related courseware nationwide. To ensure quality content in NEEDS, he is responsible for developing a two-tiered evaluation system for engineering education courseware. At the base level is a peer review of courseware based on the journal-model. The highest level is a national award competition, the

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--> Premier Award for Excellence in Engineering Education courseware. He has experience developing, using, and evaluating engineering education courseware. As a lecturer in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley he has taught courses in the development of multimedia case studies. Mr. Muramatsu received an M.S. and B.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. JEANNE L. NARUM, INDEPENDENT COLLEGES OFFICE Jeanne Narum is the director of the Independent Colleges Office (ICO) and the director of Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL), both based in Washington, D.C. The ICO serves as the Washington representative for the Associated Colleges of the Midwest and a select group of liberal arts colleges across the country, assisting in their relations with federal agencies and programs. Narum, with over 20 years experience with faculty, curricular, and institutional development projects, came to the ICO in 1988 from administrative positions at Augsburg College (VP for college relations), Dickinson College (director of development), and St. Olaf College (director of government and foundation relations). In 1989, she became the founding Director of PKAL, and has continued to have responsibility for developing and coordinating the various facets of PKAL, including the Faculty for the 21st Century Network, the seminars and publications on facilities planning, and the workshops and events on disciplinary, topical, and institutional issues. Narum was publisher for PKAL Volume I, What Works, and editor-in-chief for Volumes II, Resources for Reform and Volume III, Structures for Science. She is a member of the boards of trustees at Lenoir-Rhyne College, the alumni board at St. Olaf College, the steering committee for the Coalition for Education in the Life Sciences, and a councilor in the Council for Undergraduate Research. She has spoken land written widely on the work of transforming the learning environment for undergraduate students in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. SHAMKANT NAVATHE, GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Shamkant Navathe is a professor at the College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. He is well-known for his work on database modeling, database conversion, database design, distributed database allocation, and database integration. He has worked with IBM and Siemens in their research divisions and has been a consultant to various companies. He was the general co-chairman of the 1996 International VLDB (Very Large Data Base) conference in Bombay, India. He is an associate editor of Association for Computing Machinery's Computing Surveys, and Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineering Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering. He is also on the editorial boards of Information Systems (Pergamon Press) and Distributed and Parallel Databases (Kluwer Academic Publishers). He is an author of the book Fundamentals of Database Systems with R. Elmasri (Addison Wesley, Edition 2, 1994), which is currently the leading database textbook worldwide. His current research interests include object-oriented and multimedia databases, intelligent information retrieval, and mobile disconnected databases. Navathe holds a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan and has over 100 refereed publications. LORRAINE NORMORE, CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE Lorraine Normore is a senior associate research scientist at Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) where she has been employed since 1983. Her research has focused on exploring ways to determine and better serve the information needs of end user scientists and engineers. She was deeply involved in both the research and product specification phases for SciFinder, CAS's award-winning end user interface. She acted as the CAS liaison for the Chemistry Online Retrieval Experiment (CORE), one of the pioneer electronic library projects. Dr. Normore is an active member of both the Association for Computing Machines' Special Interest Group in Human-Computer Interaction (local and national) and of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Societies' Computer Systems Technical Group, having served in various capacities. She is also a member of Ada Semantic Interface Specification and the American Psychological Association. She received her B.A. (Hons.) degree from McGill University in 1967, her M.L.S. from the University of Toronto in 1975, and her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the Ohio State University in 1986.

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--> JAN OLSEN, CORNELL UNIVERSITY Jan Olsen has been an administrator in research libraries within institutions of higher education for the last twenty years. She has represented abroad the United States government and institutions of higher education and carried out consultancies in Brazil, Peru, the Philippines, Spain, and Africa. Dr. Olsen is the director of the Albert R. Mann Library, a major science library at Cornell University. In 1993 the Mann Library won the ALA/Meckler Library of the Future Award. This reflected the successful creation of a working digital research library. Dr. Olsen has conducted a number of research projects exploring the application of electronic technology to the use and storage of scholarly information. As a librarian, she is concerned that scholars and scholarship will be effectively served by the emerging digital library. One of her most recent publications is a book published by the Meckler Press on electronic journal literature and its implications for scholars. Dr. Olsen completed an M. L. S. degree in library science at the University of Wisconsin, a M.Ed. and a Ph.D in administration in higher education at Cornell University. ROBERT M. PANOFF, THE SHODOR EDUCATION FOUNDATION Robert Panoff is founder and executive director of The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc., a non-profit education and research corporation dedicated to reform and improvement of mathematics and science education by appropriate incorporation of computational and communication technologies. Shodor is a partner with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the new National Computational Science Alliance. As principal investigator on several National Science Foundation grants that seek to explore the interaction of high performance computing technologies and education, he worked to develop a series of interactive simulations that combine supercomputing resources and desktop computers. Besides developing and teaching a new courses in information technologies, Dr. Panoff continues an active research program in computational condensed matter physics while defining and implementing educational initiatives at the Shodor Foundation. His research specialties are stochastic optimization, quantum simulations of strongly-correlated systems, and computational science education. At Kansas State University and Clemson University from 1986-1990, he developed a fully interdisciplinary computational science and engineering course. He served as director of the Carolinas Institute in Computational Science, an NSF-funded initiative in Undergraduate Faculty Enhancement, 1991-1993. His work has won several major science and education awards, including the 1990 Gray Gigaflop Performance Award in Supercomputing, the 1994 and 1995 Undergraduate Computational Science Education Awards from the U.S. Department of Energy, and a 1995 Achievement Award from the Chicago Chapter of the Society for Technical Communication. In 1993-1994, his interactive simulations were used as the basis of an international science collaboration demonstrating network technologies involving four of the schools from the Department of Defense Dependent Schools, for which he received a letter of commendation from the Department of Defense. In recognition of Dr. Panoff's efforts in undergraduate faculty enhancement and curriculum development, the Shodor Foundation was named in 1996 as a foundation partner of the National Science Foundation for the revitalization of undergraduate education. Dr. Panoff has been a consultant at several national laboratories and is a frequent presenter at NSF-sponsored workshops on visualization, supercomputing, and networking. He has served on the advisory panel for Applications of Advanced Technology program at NSF. Dr. Panoff received his B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame and his M.A. and Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Washington University in St. Louis, undertaking both pre- and postdoctoral work at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. GILDA PAUL, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Gilda Paul is the associate director of the Pew Science Program in Undergraduate Education at Princeton University. The Pew Science Program is committed to the idea that collaborative efforts among faculty should be at the heart of projects to improve undergraduate science and mathematics education. The Pew Science Program has focused particularly on collaborations across institutional boundaries among faculty from liberal arts colleges and research universities. Pew Science Program

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--> funding has focused primarily on projects that have the potential to generate substantial improvement in undergraduate science education but that would be difficult, or even impossible, for a single institution to undertake alone. Dr. Paul received a B.A. in psychology from Barnard College in 1975, an M.A. from Columbia University in psychology in 1977, and her Ph.D. degree in developmental psychology from Temple University in 1987. BARBARA POLANSKY, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Barbara Polansky is administrator of copyright and special projects for the American Chemical Society's publications division. As an active member of various organizations that deal with copyright issues, she is chair of the electronic information committee and member of the rights and permissions licensing network committee for the Association of American Publishers' Professional/Scholarly Publishing Division, co-founder and past chair of the Copyright Round Table (Washington, DC), and is a member of the copyright committee of International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM). Ms. Polansky was executive director of the American Copyright Council from 1985-1986. She is a lecturer and author of various papers and book chapters on copyright, and is co-editor of the book, Modern Copyright Fundamentals; Weil, B.H.; Polansky, B.F., Eds., Revised Edition, Learned Information, 1990. Ms. Polansky received a B.S. in Operations Management from the Pennsylvania State University in 1975 and did graduate course-work in library science at the University of Illinois, as well as continuing legal education at the Practicing Law Institute in New York. MICHAEL RAUGH, INTERCONNECT TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION Mike Raugh is vice president and chief technology officer of Interconnect Technologies Corporation. Interconnect Technologies is a Silicon Valley firm specializing in research and development and application of digital library technologies. Dr. Raugh has worked in advanced technology at Stanford University and Hewlett-Packard Labs. Before joining Interconnect, he served as chief scientist at the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science where he developed innovative methods for organizing online information. He leads Interconnect's products and services for information organization and analysis. RUTH K. SEIDMAN, MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Ruth Seidman is head of the Engineering and Science Libraries at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she has led the librarian staff in innovative partnering with faculty to teach information competencies in the undergraduate engineering design curriculum. She previously served as Director of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Research Library. Ms. Seidman is the editor of the Haworth Press, Inc., quarterly Science & Technology Libraries. In 1990-1991, she was President of Special Libraries Association; she is also a member of the American Library Association, the Association of College and Research Libraries, the American Society for Engineering Education, and Phi Beta Kappa. Ms. Seidman has given presentations widely on library automation, library management, and international librarianship. She is the author of the 1993 monograph, Building Global Partnerships for Library Cooperation. Her Web home page is <http://web.mit.edu/rks/www/>. Ms. Seidman holds a bachelor's degrees with highest honors from Brown University, master's degrees from Harvard University and from Hebrew College of Brookline, Massachusetts, and a masters degree in library science from Case Western Reserve University, where she was elected to Beta Phi Mu. FRANK M. SHIPMAN III, TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Frank Shipman is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Center for the Study of Digital Libraries at Texas A&M University. He has been pursuing research in the areas of hypermedia, computer-supported cooperative work, and intelligent user interfaces since 1987. Dr. Shipman's doctoral work at the University of Colorado and subsequent work at Xerox PARC and Texas A&M has investigated combining informal and formal representations in interfaces and methods for supporting incremental formalization. He manages two on-going research projects in the areas of spatial hypertext and computers and education.

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--> AMANDA SPINK, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS Amanda Spink is assistant professor of information science at the University of North Texas. Dr. Spink has numerous funded and industry projects and publications in the area of user modeling research for digital libraries and interactive information retrieval. Her research includes developing a digital library for cattle ranchers. Dr. Spink is also an associate editor of the journal Information Processing and Management. She received a B.A. from the Australian National University, a postgraduate degree in information from the University of New South Wales, an M.B.A in information technology management from Fordham University and a Ph.D. in information science from Rutgers University. RONALD STEVENS, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES Ron Stevens received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in microbiology and molecular genetics in 1971 and is professor of microbiology and immunology and professor of education. For 15 years he directed an immunology research laboratory and authored/co-authored over 100 articles in basic and clinical immunology. He is also the developer and original programmer of the Interactive Multimedia EXercises (IMMEX) problem-solving software which is used for evaluating the problem-solving performances of students from elementary schools through medical schools. Additional analytic software tools allow an electronic re-construction of the strategies that students' employ as they solve the problems allowing a determination of not only if the problem was solved, but how the problem was solved. Dr. Stevens has authored over a dozen educational research papers based on his use of IMMEX for evaluating students. He is currently using artificial neural networks in conjunction with the students' problem-solving performances to identify strategic problem-solving patterns that can discriminate within the novice-expert continuum. Dr. Stevens is the principal investigator on a major grant from the National Science Foundation to use the IMMEX software system to help integrate technology and problem-solving into all the science classrooms of the middle and high schools of Los Angeles. KEITH STUBBS, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Keith Stubbs' current responsibilities as Director of the National Library of Education's Resource Sharing and Cooperation Division include the U.S. Department of Education's Web site, the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) and its 30+ Web sites (which include AskERIC and the National Parent Information Network), and plans for a resource sharing network for educational libraries and information providers. Mr. Stubbs initiated ED's Interact presence in 1992, launched ED's Web site in March 1994, led an award-winning Web redesign and wrote ED's Web Server Standards & Guidelines in 1995, and recently conducted one of the first OMB-sanctioned Internet customer surveys. He co-chairs ED's Internet Working Group and represents ED on the interagency World Wide Web (WWW) Federal Consortium and the Federal Internet-Based Education Resources (FIBER) initiative. Currently he is directing several cross-site indexing, cataloging, and searching projects to help people find the information they seek among the exploding volume of education material scattered across thousands of Internet sites. *DIANE VIZINE-GOETZ, ON LINE COMPUTER LIBRARY CENTER Diane Vizine-Goetz joined On line Computer Library Center in 1983 as Postdoctoral fellow to continue research in database quality begun as an OCLC research assistant and doctoral student. Since then she has conducted research on the application and use of Library of Congress subject headings in online bibliographic systems and on automated classifier-assistance tools. Her research interests include cataloging and classifying print and electronic resources. She is principal research investigator on a project to enhance the usefulness of the direct digital control as a knowledge organizing tool. Dr. Vizine-Goetz received her Ph.D. from the School of Information and Library Science, Case Western Reserve University. NISHA VORA, ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN PUBLISHERS Nisha Vora is currently the deputy director of copyright and new technology for the Association of American Publishers. She is responsible for AAP's International Enforcement Program, the Rights and Permissions Advisory Committee, and the Interna-

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--> tional Copyright Information Center. She is also the public liaison for the Electronic Publishing Special Interest Group, and helps to coordinate meetings of AAPs Enabling Technologies and Copyright Committees. Ms. Vora works with the U.S. government, including the U.S. Trade Representative, the Copyright Office, and the United States Information Agency for the protection of American copyrights here and abroad. Ms. Vora works with the International Intellectual Property Alliance, an umbrella organization of seven associations, to represent the U.S. copyright-based industries in bilateral and multilateral efforts to improve international protection of copyrighted works. She is responsible for the operation of AAP's copyright enforcement campaign in ten countries, and assists in coordinating copyright enforcement efforts in the United States. Ms. Vora earned her B.A. in communications from Virginia Tech, and has been with AAP since 1994. PAUL WELLIN, WOLFRAM RESEARCH Paul Wellin is the director of Corporate and Academic Affairs for Wolfram Research, Inc., maker of the technical computing software Mathematica. In this role, he serves as the liaison between Wolfram Research and industry and academia. Prior to joining Wolfram Research, Dr. Wellin was in academia, teaching mathematics in California. He is the author of two books (one on programming and another on computer simulations) and is the founder (and editor for its first five years) of the paper and electronic journal Mathematica in Education and Research (Springer-Verlag). He is chair of the Mathematics Advisory Board for Wolfram Research, and is a member of the Corporate and Foundation Alliance of the National Science Foundation. WAYNE WOLF, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Wayne Wolf is associate professor of electrical engineering at Princeton University. Before joining Princeton, he was with AT&T Bell Laboratories. He received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1980, 1981, and 1984, respectively. His research interests include computer-aided design of VLSI and embedded computing systems, video signal processors, and video libraries. He is a senior member of the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and the International Society for Optical Engineering. LEE ZIA, UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE Lee Zia is an associate professor of mathematics at the University of New Hampshire. He has been involved in a range of activities concerning undergraduate education, including the use of computational and visualization tools in differential equations, linear algebra, and scientific computing. Dr. Zia serves on the Education Committee for the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and is an associate editor for the education section of SIAM Review. In 1995 and 1996 he was a program director with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education, where a primary area of responsibility concerned information technology issues and their impact on undergraduate education. Dr. Zia received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of North Carolina in 1978, an M.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Brown University in 1985.