PLATE 1. (upper) Drawing of the microscopic appearance of Brucella abortus in placental exudates and placental membrane surfaces (lower) of a cow that had aborted. Bacteria are in and around leukocytes in pus. Source: Poppe 1929.



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PLATE 1. (upper) Drawing of the microscopic appearance of Brucella abortus in placental exudates and placental membrane surfaces (lower) of a cow that had aborted. Bacteria are in and around leukocytes in pus. Source: Poppe 1929.

OCR for page 187
PLATE 2. Histology (A,C,D) and immunohistochemistry (B,D,F) of tissues from the uterus and retained placenta from an aborting bison cow found in March 1995 adjacent to the YNP. A. Necrosis and exudate, placenta. B. Strong labeling of bacteria in trophoblastic epithelial cells. C. Non-necrotic areas of the placenta. D. Lesser amounts of bacteria in non-necrotic areas of the placenta. E. Lung: hyperemia with necrotic debris in a large bronchiole (center). F. Bacterial debris in bronchiolar lumen are stained. Source: Courtesy J. Ryhan.