Click for next page ( 238


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 237
Biographical Sketches of Contributors and Editors EDUARDO S. BRONDIZIO is a postdoctoral fellow and assistant director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change at Indiana University. His work has focused on agricultural and agroforestry intensification, land-use and land-cover change, secondary succes- sion in the Eastern Amazonia region (especially in the Amazon estuary), and the application of remote sensing to these issues. Previously, he was the coordinator of the project that led to the 1990 publication atlas of the Atlantic Forest Remains in Brazil. His work has appeared in numerous journals, including Human Ecol- ogy, Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, and Research in Eco- nomic Anthropology. He received a PhD degree in environmental science from Indiana University. APHICHAT CHAMRATRITHIRONG is the former director and an associate professor of the Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol Univer- sity, Thailand. His current research has focused on population and environment, migration, and reproductive health in Thailand, including the evaluation of a condom promotion program and the Thailand National Contraceptive Prevalence Survey. He was a member of two research review committees of the World Health Organization. He is past president of the Thailand Population Associa- tion. He received a BA degree in political science from Chulalongkorn Univer- sity, Thailand, and AM and PhD degrees in sociology from Brown University. H(~Hrl~ (~11EN is director of the Data Center Services Division at the Consor- tium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) and man 237

OCR for page 237
238 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS ager of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC), operated by CIESIN for the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Previously, he served on the faculty at Brown University with the Alan Shawn Feinstein World Hunger Program, where his research dealt with global environ- mental change and future food security, hunger among refugees, and the mea- surement and alleviation of hunger. His current work focuses on the intersection between environment and security, the interdisciplinary integration of natural and social science data, and the human dimensions of global environmental change. He holds a bachelor's degree in earth and planetary sciences, master's degrees in meteorology and physical oceanography and in technology and policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a PhD degree in geography from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. RINKU ROY CHOWDHURY is a doctoral student in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. Her specialties are geographic information sys- tems and remote sensing, ecology, and human-environment relationships. She holds a BA degree in environmental science and computer science from Wellesley College and an MS degree in conservation ecology and sustainable development from the University of Georgia. DAVID }. COWEN is director of the Liberal Arts Computing Lab, codirector of the NASA Visiting Investigator Program, and Carolina distinguished professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. His research and instruction have focused on geographic information systems. He is currently the president of the Cartographic and Geographic Information Society of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, and he has served on the Mapping Science Committee of the National Research Council and the Geographic Information Systems Com- mission of the International Geographical Union. He has also been chair of the Association of American Geographers' Geographic Information Systems Spe- cialty Group and the South Carolina State Mapping Advisory Committee. He is author or coauthor of numerous publications dealing with advances in spatial data handling. He earned BA and MA degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a PhD degree in geography from Ohio State University. BARBARA ENTWISLE is professor of sociology and a fellow of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her current research focuses on the population dynamics and demographic responses to changes in the landscape and environment and on spatial organization of the landscape in Nang Rong, Thailand, due to social and environmental forces. Her work has been published in numerous journals, including Demography, Popula- tion Research and Policy Review, Studies in Family Planning, and the American Sociological Review. She is currently a member of ther National Institutes of Health Social Science and Population Study Section, a member of the advisory

OCR for page 237
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS 239 board of the General Social Survey and about to become co-editor of Demogra- phy. She received an AB degree in sociology-anthropology from Swarthmore College and AM and PhD degrees in sociology from Brown University. PAUL R. EPSTEIN is Associate Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School. He has worked in medical, teaching, and research capacities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. He has coordinated and coedited an eight-part series on Health and Climate Change for The Lancet and is a principal core author for Human Health and Climate Change, a publication supported by the World Health Organization, the World Meteoro- logical Organization, the U.N. Environmental Program, and the Intergovernmen- tal Panel on Climate Change. He is currently coordinating an integrated assess- ment of disease events along the East Coast of North America, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean. He is a member of the Health of the Oceans Module of the Global Ocean Observing System. He received a BA degree from Cornell University, an MD degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and an MPH degree in tropical public health from the Harvard School of Public Health. JACQUELINE GEOGHEGAN is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and a participating faculty member in the Environmental School at Clark University. Previously, she was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Mary- land. Her general fields of research are environmental economics, development economics, and environmental law and policy. Her specific research interests include the design and use of environmental taxes for regulatory and fiscal re- form; spatially explicit theoretical and empirical modeling of human-induced land-use change (in both the United States and Mexico); and linkages among human behavior, urban transportation, and environmental quality. She received a PhD degree in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley. CHARLES HUTCHINSON is a professor of arid lands studies at the University of Arizona. He serves as the director of the Arizona Remote Sensing Center, Office of Arid Lands Studies, College of Agriculture, and as chair of the campus- wide Interdisciplinary Committee on Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis. His research has focused most recently on developing methods for famine early warn- ing in Africa and the Caribbean Basin and working with the Global Information and Early Warning System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the Famine Early Warning System and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the U.S. Agency for International Development. Previ- ously, he held a Gilbert F. White fellowship at Resources for the Future and was a member of the technical staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology and at the EROS Program of the U.S. Geological Survey.

OCR for page 237
240 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS He received BA, MA, and PhD degrees in geography from the University of California, Riverside. JOHN R. JENSEN is a Carolina distinguished professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. His research has focused on remote sensing of vegetation biophysical resources, especially inland and coastal wetlands; urban/suburban land use and land cover; and the development of im- proved digital image processing classification, change detection, and error evalu- ation algorithms. He is a contributing author to the Manual of Remote Sensing and the Manual of Photographic Interpretation. He was the President of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing from 1995-1996. He has received several awards in the field of remote sensing, including the Alan Gordon Memorial Award for significant achievements in remote sensing and photographic interpretation from the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, and the Remote Sensing Medal from the Remote Sensing Spe- cialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. Dr. Jensen received a BA degree in physical geography from the California State University at Fuller- ton, a master's degree from Brigham Young University, and a PhD degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. DIANA LIVERMAN is director of the Latin American studies program at the University of Arizona, where she is also associated with the Department of Geog- raphy, the Institute for the Study of Planet Earth, the Office of Arid Lands Studies, and the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy. She has published widely on drought, climate impacts, resource management, and environmental policy. Her current research examines the social causes and consequences of global and regional environmental change, especially the impacts of climate change and variability on water resources and agriculture in the Americas and the social causes of land-use and land-cover change in Mexico. She is cochair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Inter-American Institute for Global Change. She received a BA degree from the University of London, England, an MA degree from the University of Toronto, Canada, and a PhD degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, all in geography. STANLEY A. MORAIN is professor of geography and director of the Earth Data Analysis Center at the University of New Mexico and has served as chair of the Geography Department. He has focused his basic and applied research on understanding the spectral and spatial attributes of natural resource development and management. He is the author or editor of several books and many technical papers on the subject. He is a fellow of both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) and is a past national president of ASPRS. He cur- rently serves as editor-in-chief of the ASPRS journal, Photogrammetric Engi

OCR for page 237
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS 241 peering and Remote Sensing, and is on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Remote Sensing and GeoCarto International: A Multidisciplinary Journal of Remote Sensing. Dr. Morain received a BA degree from the Univer- sity of California, Riverside, and a PhD degree from the University of Kansas, both in geography. EMILIO F. MORAN is professor of anthropology, director of the Anthropo- logical Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change, codirector of the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environ- mental Change, and professor of environmental science at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, all at Indiana University. He has carried out research in Amazonia for the past 25 years on migration, land use, social organization of frontier communities, and tropical ecology. In recent years he has begun applica- tions of remote sensing to issues of land-use and land-cover change. He is currently studying the role that the structure of households may play in differen- tial rates of deforestation. He is the author of numerous books, edited volumes, and journal articles. He received a PhD degree in anthropology from the Univer- sity of Florida. YELENA OGNEVA-HIMMELBERGER is a doctoral candiate in the School of Geography at Clark University. Previously, she was a researcher in the Insti- tute of Geography of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Her specialty is geo- graphic information systems, remote sensing, and global environmental change. She holds BS and MS degrees in physical geography from Moscow State Univer- sity. MARK PATTERSON is a student in the doctoral program in geography at the University of Arizona. His current research examines the social implications of using geographic information systems in resource management decision making. His other research interests include using remote sensing to classify forest fire severity for the U.S. Forest Service, examining land-cover change in Mexico through satellite image interpretation, and investigating the potential impacts of climate change on the resource base of the Southwest. Mr. Patterson received a BS degree in geography from University of Victoria, Canada, and an MS degree in geography from the University of Guelph, Canada. LOWELL PRITCHARD, ,IR. is a research associate in the Tropical Conserva- tion and Development Program and a doctoral student in the Food and Resource Economics Department, both at the University of Florida. He is also the science officer for Focus 1 of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme/Inter- national Human Dimensions Programme joint project on Land-Use and Land- Cover Change (LUCC). He participates in the Resilience Network of the Beijer International Institute for Ecological Economics, through his work on institu

OCR for page 237
242 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS tional change, network externalities, and human agency. He holds degrees in environmental engineering and systems ecology from the University of Florida and in zoology from Duke University. RONALD R. RINDFUSS is professor of sociology and fellow of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His social demographic research has focused on fertility, household formation, marriage and marital dissolution, and child care, in both the Untied States and a number of Asian countries. More recently, he has been examining the link between popula- tion change and environmental change, with particular emphasis on the role of migration. With colleagues at the Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, and various American universities, he has been part of a longitudinal study of Nang Rong District, Thailand. He is a past president of the Population Association of America and a former director of the Carolina Popula- tion Center. He is a member of the International Scientific Planning Committee for the 1999 Open Meeting of the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change Research Community. He holds a PhD degree from Princeton Univer- sity. STEVEN SANDERSON is Vice President for Arts and Sciences and Dean of Emory College at Emory University. He has studied the politics of rural poverty, natural resource use, and environmental change, with special reference to Latin America. Previously, Dr. Sanderson served as Ford Foundation program officer for rural poverty and resources in Brazil, where he designed and implemented the foundation's Amazon program. He was also on the faculty of the University of Florida, where he directed the Tropical Conservation and Development Program and founded the Conservation and Development Forum, a worldwide partnership on sustainable futures funded by the Ford Foundation. Since 1994 he has chaired the Social Science Research Council Committee for Research on Global Environ- mental Change, and he serves as a member of the International Scientific Steering Committee of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme/International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change project on Land-Use/Cover Change. He is an elected member of the board of directors of Oxfam America. He holds a PhD in political science from Stanford University. THOMAS L. SEVER is a remote sensing archeologist at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center of the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Previously, he worked in the Earth Systems Science Office of the NASA-Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, on the faculty of the University of Southern Missis- sippi, and as a scientific supervisor at Lockheed Electronics Corporation. His work has focused on bringing remote sensing and geographic information sys- tems technology to the disciplines of anthropology and archeology. He has been conducting research in northern Guatemala for a decade, and his work contrib

OCR for page 237
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS 243 uted to the establishment of the Maya Biosphere Reserve. He has also worked with airborne and satellite systems conducting international research in Israel, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and the United States. His awards include the Society of Professional Archeologists Exceptional Achievement Award, the NASA Exceptional Achievement Award, and the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Award. He holds a PhD in anthropology from the Uni- versity of Colorado. DAVID L. SKOLE is professor of geography and director of the Basic Science and Remote Sensing Initiative at Michigan State University. His research em- phasis has been on developing numerical models of the global carbon cycle, focusing on the role of land cover and ecosystem dynamics. He has worked extensively with large satellite data sets and data collection systems, including Landsat and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. He serves on a number of national and international advisory panels, including the NASA/Earth Observing System-Data and Information System advisory panel, the LP-Distrib- uted Active Archive Center Advisory Panel and the Oak Ridge Distributed Ac- tive Archive Center Advisory Panel. In addition, he is chair of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme/International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change project on Land-Use/Land-Cover Change and a member of the Steering Committee for the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme's Data and Information System, as well as the Science Advisory Panel for the Programme's Southeast Asian Regional Committee for the Global Change System for Analysis, Research, and Training (START). PAUL C. STERN is study director of the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and the Committee on International Conflict Resolution at the National Research Council, research professor of sociology at George Mason University, and president of the Social and Environmental Research Institute. In his major research area, the human dimensions of environmental problems, he has written numerous scholarly articles and coedited and coauthored several books; he has also authored a textbook on social science research methods and coedited several books on international conflict issues. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Association for the Ad- vancement of Science. He holds a BA degree from Amherst College and MA and PhD degrees in psychology from Clark University. B. L. TURNER II is the Milton P. and Alice C. Higgins professor of environ- ment and society and director of the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University and former director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute. His re- search focus is nature-society relationships, subjects on which he has authored or edited several books and numerous articles, ranging from ancient Maya agricul- ture and environment in Mexico and Central America, to contemporary agricul

OCR for page 237
244 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS tural change in the tropics, to global land-use change. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has been awarded honors for research by the Association of American Geographers and the Centenary Medal by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. He received BA and MA degrees in geography from the University of Texas at Austin and a PhD degree in geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. STEPHEN J. WALSH is professor of geography at the University of North Carolina, director of the spatial analysis laboratory in that department, a senior research fellow at the university's Sheps Center for Health Services Research, and director of the Spatial Analysis Unit at the Carolina Population Center. Previously, he was on the faculty of Oklahoma State University, where he estab- lished the Center for Application of Remote Sensing. His research focuses on population-environment interactions, land-use and land-cover change, environ- mental modeling, health care accessibility, and spatial analysis; his methodologi- cal research focuses on geographic information systems and remote sensing. Most recently he has worked on population-environment projects in Thailand and Ecuador and environmental modeling in Montana, North Carolina, and Georgia. He earned a PhD degree in geography from Oregon State University. CHARLES H. WOOD is director of the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. Previously, he was a professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, where he was affiliated with the Population Research Center. He has held visiting appointments at the Center for Development and Regional Planning (CEDEPLAR) at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. His areas of specialization include demography, Latin American studies, and the sociology of development. His research has focused mainly on the Amazon region of Brazil and the processes of land settlement and deforestation that have recently taken place in that part of the world. He has published three books and numerous scholarly articles. He re- ceived a PhD degree in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin.