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Biographies of Committee Members

DAVID J. GOODMAN, chair, is director of the Wireless Information Network Laboratory at Rutgers University, where he is also a professor and former chairman in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Previously, he spent 20 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he was a department head in communications systems research. Dr. Goodman received a B.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, an M.S. degree from New York University, and a Ph.D. from Imperial College, University of London, all in electrical engineering. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

NORMAN ABRAMSON is vice president and chief technology officer of ALOHA Networks, Inc. Previously, he was director of the ALOHA System at the University of Hawaii and a professor of electrical engineering at Hawaii and at Stanford University. Dr. Abramson has taught communication theory, computer networks, and satellite communication courses at the University of California at Berkeley, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology while on visiting appointments. He is a recipient of the Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications award given by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Dr. Abramson received an A.B. degree from Harvard University and an M.A. degree from the University



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Page 175 A Biographies of Committee Members DAVID J. GOODMAN, chair, is director of the Wireless Information Network Laboratory at Rutgers University, where he is also a professor and former chairman in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Previously, he spent 20 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he was a department head in communications systems research. Dr. Goodman received a B.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, an M.S. degree from New York University, and a Ph.D. from Imperial College, University of London, all in electrical engineering. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Institution of Electrical Engineers. NORMAN ABRAMSON is vice president and chief technology officer of ALOHA Networks, Inc. Previously, he was director of the ALOHA System at the University of Hawaii and a professor of electrical engineering at Hawaii and at Stanford University. Dr. Abramson has taught communication theory, computer networks, and satellite communication courses at the University of California at Berkeley, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology while on visiting appointments. He is a recipient of the Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications award given by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Dr. Abramson received an A.B. degree from Harvard University and an M.A. degree from the University

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Page 176 of California at Los Angeles, both in physics, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. EUGENE CACCIAMANI is a senior vice president at Hughes Network Systems, where he is responsible for business development, advanced systems engineering, and government business. Previously, he was president and chief executive officer of MA/COMNET and held key management positions at the American Satellite Company and the Communications Satellite Corporation. Dr. Cacciamani also worked at RCA Data Systems Division and served in the U.S. Air Force. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received a B.S. degree from Union College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Catholic University of America, all in electrical engineering. JOEL ENGEL, recently retired as vice president-technology at Ameritech. Previously, he was vice president for research and development at MCI and vice president of engineering at Satellite Business Systems. Dr. Engel also held several positions, including manager for corporate planning studies, at AT&T and Bell Laboratories and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Instrumentation Laboratory. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is a recipient of the National Medal of Technology and the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal. Dr. Engel received a B.S. degree from the City College of New York, an M.S. degree from MIT, and a Ph.D. degree from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. MARK EPSTEIN is vice president, development, at QUALCOMM, Inc. Prior to joining QUALCOMM, Dr. Epstein served as deputy for C3I to the assistant secretary of the U.S. Army (RDA), and, earlier, as a staff assistant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. His previous positions include program director at the Computer Sciences Corporation and assistant director, engineering, for Northrop Page Communications. Dr. Epstein received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. He serves as chairman of the Telecommunications Industry Association's International Standards Coordinating Committee and as a member of two U.S. delegations to the International Telecommunications Union Radiocommunication Sector. BRUCE FETTE is chief engineer at Motorola's Government and Systems Technology Group Communications Division. He has been involved in signal processing analysis for numerous systems, including the

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Page 177 SpeakEASY multiband, multimode radio; wideband wireless network; Joint Special Forces Operations Radio System, Integrated Team Radio; and numerous vocoders and systems in the STU-III family of secure telephone systems. Dr. Fette received a B.S. degree from the University of Cincinnati and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Arizona State University, all in electrical engineering. DOUGLAS C. FIELDS is a vice president of United Parcel Service, where he has been involved in developing wireless voice and data communications systems for the worldwide delivery vehicle fleet. Previously, he directed telecommunications planning for Corning Glass Works, Levi Strauss & Company, and Key Services Corporation and was a consultant to the Pacific Telephone Company. Mr. Fields attended Los Angeles City College and served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. He is a member of the International Telecommunications Users Group. BEZALEL GAVISH is a professor at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University. He previously held positions at the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration, Naval Postgraduate School, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, and University of Rochester. In addition, he was a visiting researcher at Bell Laboratories and IBM Corp. and a department head for the Israel Defense Forces logistics branch. Dr. Gavish received a B.Sc. degree in industrial engineering and management science and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in operations research, all from Technion. ANDREA GOLDSMITH is an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. She previously worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories and MAXIM Technologies. Dr. Goldsmith is the recipient of a National Science Foundation career development award and was an IBM fellow. She is an editor of both IEEE Transactions on Communications and IEEE Personal Communications Magazine. Dr. Goldsmith received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley, all in electrical engineering. RANDY H. KATZ is a professor of computer science at the University of California at Berkeley and a principal investigator in the Bay Area Wireless Access Network project. He has taught at UC Berkeley since 1983, with the exception of 1993 and 1994, when he was a program manager and deputy director of the Computing Systems Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Dr. Katz received a B.S. degree from Cornell University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UC Berkeley, all in computer science. He is a fellow of

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Page 178 the Association for Computing Machinery and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. EDWIN A. KELLEY is division chief scientist and manager of the digital transceiver product line for both commercial and military applications at Hughes Communication Products, Hughes Aircraft Company. Mr. Kelley has been the program manager for the advanced secure digital radio and the advanced communications engine project supported by the Department of Defense. Mr. Kelley received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science, all from the University of California at Berkeley. KAVEH PAHLAVAN is director of the Center for Wireless Information Network Studies at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where he is also a professor. Previously, he was the director of advanced development at Infinit, Inc., and taught at Northeastern University. He is a consultant to numerous companies on cellular networks, communications theory, and technical aspects of wireless networks. Dr. Pahlavan is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Communication Society and the editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Wireless Information Networks. He received an M.S. degree from the University of Tehran and a Ph.D. degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, both in electrical engineering. CHARLES E. PERKINS is a senior staff engineer at Sun Microsystems. Previously, he was a research staff member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. He is the author or co-author of standards-track documents in the srvloc (service location), dhc (dynamic host configuration), and IPng (IP new generation) working groups of the Internet Engineering Task Force. He also serves on the Internet Architecture Board and recently wrote a book on Mobile IP. Mr. Perkins is an associate editor of Mobile Communications and Computing Review, the official publication of ACM SIGMOBILE, and serves on the editorial board of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. He received a B.A. degree in mathematics and an M.E.E. degree from Rice University, and an M.A. degree in mathematics from Columbia University. THEODORE RAPPAPORT is professor and director of the Mobile and Portable Radio Research Group in the Bradley Department of Electrical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Previously, he was a postdoctoral research associate at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center for Intelligent Manufacturing Systems at Purdue University and an engineer at Harris Corp. Dr.

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Page 179 Rappaport is a fellow of the Radio Club of America and a recipient of the NSF presidential faculty fellow award and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Marconi Young Scientist Award. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University, all in electrical engineering. JESSE RUSSELL, is chief wireless architect and managing director of the AT&T Wireless Communications Center of Excellence. His previous positions at AT&T include chief technical officer in the Wireless Systems Business Unit, vice president of the Advanced Wireless Technology Laboratory, director of the Cellular Transmission Laboratory and Cellular Telecommunications Laboratory, and head of several departments. Mr. Russell is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has received numerous awards, including U.S. Black Engineer of the Year. He received a B.S. degree from Tennessee State University and an M.S. from Stanford University, both in electrical engineering.