Notes

  • 1.  

    National Science Board, Washington, D.C. The most recent edition was published in 1996.

  • 2.  

    In addition to differences between the samples, there are discrepancies between responses to the NSF survey and the same firm's SEC reports. Bill Long of Business Performance Research Associates and Bronwyn Hall of the University of California at Berkeley and Oxford University are currently examining these discrepancies to determine their sources. See page 22.

  • 3.  

    Although these suggestions reflect the view of several workshop participants, they were summarized succinctly in a presentation by Bill Long.

  • 4.  

    BEA has established several satellite accounts on various topics. These are ancillary to the national income and product accounts and are often experimental in nature. See BEA, "A Satellite Account for Research and Development," Survey of Current Business, November 1994, p. 37.

  • 5.  

    In 1995 the Science, Technology and Economic Policy Board organized an international research conference to demonstrate the utility of an analysis of micro-data on technology use, plant and firm performance, and employment effects. Several U.S. research presentations were based on SMT data. Selected revised papers from the conference, together with as summary by Bronwyn Hall and Francis Kramarz, will appear in three successive 1998 issues of the Journal of the Economics of Innovation and New Technology.

  • 6.  

    Indeed, the expanded 1995 survey revealed surprisingly large R&D investments in services, accounting for 25 percent of expenditures in 1994, up from 8 percent in 1987. Another source of discontinuity in the NSF R&D data was the inclusion of more smaller businesses.

  • 7.  

    Public Law 101–533, the Foreign Direct Investment and International Financial Services Data Improvement Act of 1990. It is not clear whether this authority would allow linking of BEA's multinational company foreign direct investment data with the Census-collected NSF R&D data.



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--> Notes 1.   National Science Board, Washington, D.C. The most recent edition was published in 1996. 2.   In addition to differences between the samples, there are discrepancies between responses to the NSF survey and the same firm's SEC reports. Bill Long of Business Performance Research Associates and Bronwyn Hall of the University of California at Berkeley and Oxford University are currently examining these discrepancies to determine their sources. See page 22. 3.   Although these suggestions reflect the view of several workshop participants, they were summarized succinctly in a presentation by Bill Long. 4.   BEA has established several satellite accounts on various topics. These are ancillary to the national income and product accounts and are often experimental in nature. See BEA, "A Satellite Account for Research and Development," Survey of Current Business, November 1994, p. 37. 5.   In 1995 the Science, Technology and Economic Policy Board organized an international research conference to demonstrate the utility of an analysis of micro-data on technology use, plant and firm performance, and employment effects. Several U.S. research presentations were based on SMT data. Selected revised papers from the conference, together with as summary by Bronwyn Hall and Francis Kramarz, will appear in three successive 1998 issues of the Journal of the Economics of Innovation and New Technology. 6.   Indeed, the expanded 1995 survey revealed surprisingly large R&D investments in services, accounting for 25 percent of expenditures in 1994, up from 8 percent in 1987. Another source of discontinuity in the NSF R&D data was the inclusion of more smaller businesses. 7.   Public Law 101–533, the Foreign Direct Investment and International Financial Services Data Improvement Act of 1990. It is not clear whether this authority would allow linking of BEA's multinational company foreign direct investment data with the Census-collected NSF R&D data.