Appendix A
Legislative Language for Increased Vitamin C Fortification



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--> Appendix A Legislative Language for Increased Vitamin C Fortification

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--> SRpt 102–419 REPORT To accompany H.R. 5368 FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAM APPROPRIATION BILL, 1993 Senate Appropriations (COMREPORTS 09/23/92; 7770 lines) Item Key: 2016 Special Typefaces Key: [[ ]] Text to be omitted // \\ Italic text Increase in Vitamin C Fortification The Committee recommends that AID Increase the fortification level of vitamin C in AID export commodities from 40 to 100 milligrams per 100 gram ration, in the title II Public Law 480 program. The Committee believes that recent and continuing scientific data has demonstrated that increased levels or vitamin C are necessary to help decrease and eliminate health problems in affected populations in recipient countries. Furthermore, increased vitamin C fortification levels will help prevent diseases and health problems, thus decreasing overall program and medical relief costs. SRpt 103–142 REPORT To accompany H.R. 2295 FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATION BILL, 1994 Senate Appropriations (COMREPORTS 09/14/93; 7949 lines) Item Key: 662 Special Typefaces Key: [[ ]] Text to be omitted // \\ Italic text Vitamin C Fortification Recipients of U.S. food aid in many nations suffer from nutritional problem that could be alleviated, or in some cases climinated by the increased consumption of vitamin C. Recent studies have shown, for example, that new mothers and infants can greatly improve their health through consumption of this vitamin. One effective means of increased vitamin C consumption is done by increasing fortification levels of the commodities sent under title II of the Public Law 480 Food Aid Program from the current level of 40 milligrams per 100 gram ration to 100 milligrams. In those cases where no fortification exists, fortification should likewise be started at 100 milligram per 100 gram ration. The Committee notes that improving the health of food aid recipients can reduce the need for, and cost of, medical intervention at a later stage. The Committee intends that AID expeditiously move to increase the fortification Levels of affected commodities. <><><><><><><><><><><><>

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--> HRpt 103–633 CONFERENCE REPORT To accompany H.R. 4426 MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1995 Conference Committee (COMREPORTS 08/01/94; 3293 lines) Item Key: 1707 Special Typefaces Key: [[ ]] Text to be omitted // \\ Italic text 103rd CONGRESS } HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES { Report 2d Session } { 103–633   MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1995 August 1, 1994.—Ordered to be printed Mr. OBEY, from the committee of conference, submitted the following CONFERENCE REPORT [To accompany H.R. 4426] The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 4426) ''making appropriations for the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995,'' having met, after full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows: Vitamin C The conferees believe that more accurate information is needed regarding the fortification of food that is shipped overseas through the Public law 480 Food for Peace Program. The conferees therefore request the Administrator of the Agency for International Development to report to the Committees on Appropriations by February 15, 1995 with an estimate of the cost of fortifying grains shipped under the Public Law 480 program to 100 mg per 100 grams ration and an assessment of whether or not the fortification of grain is stable through the shipping process.

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--> HRpt 104–143 REPORT To accompany H.R. 1868 FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 1996 House Appropriations (COMREPORTS 06/15/95; 4457 lines) Item Key: 453 Special Typefaces Key: [[ ]] Text to be omitted // \\ Italic text 104th CONGRESS } HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES { Report Ist Session } { 104–143   FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAM APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 1996 June 15, 1995.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed Mr. CALLAHAN, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following REPORT together with MINORITY VIEWS [To accompany H.R. 1868] The Committee on Appropriations submits the following report in explanation of the accompanying bill making appropriations for Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs, and for sundry independent agencies and corporations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, and for other purposes. Vitamin C Fortification Last year's report requested that AID increase vitamin C fortification levels as part of the Public Law 480 Food Aid Program. A report was submitted by AID on the cost of fortifying commodities with vitamin C. While the study indicated that vitamin C may lose stability over time and in the presence of moisture, the results appear to be inconclusive as they affect Corn-Soy-Blend (CSB) and Wheat-Soy-Blend (WSB), the principal commodities that are fortified. Other studies have shown that new mothers and infants can greatly improve their health through consumption of vitamin C. The Committee recommends that AID perform a pilot program, using up to $500,000 from the funds provided in this account, involving the fortification of commodities with vitamin C, and expects that the agency will report back on the results of that pilot program by April 1, 1996.

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--> SRpt 104–143 REPORT To accompany H.R. 1868 FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATION BILL, 1996 Senate Appropriations (COMREPORTS 09/14/95; 6006 lines) Item Key: 740 Special Typefaces Key: [[ ]] Text to be omitted // \\ Italic text 104th CONGRESS } SENATE { Report 1st Session } { 104–143   FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAM APPROPRIATION BILL, 1996 September 14 (legislative day, SEPTEMBER 5), 1995.—Ordered to be printed Mr. MCCONNELL, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following REPORT [To accompany H.R. 1868] The Committee on Appropriations to which was referred the bill (MA H.R. 1868), making appropriations for Foreign Assistance and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, and for other purposes, reports the same to the Senate with amendments and recommends that the bill as amended do pass. Vitamin C Fortification The Committee has included language for the last 3 years, urging AID to increase vitamin C fortification in grains exported through the Public Law 480 title II Food for Peace Program. Recognizing AID's concerns regarding stability of the vitamin during the shipping and cooking processes, the Committee has urged AID to address and resolve these issues and remains concerned that AID has yet to do so. Because the AID study to test the stability of vitamin C in the shipping process was flawed, and an independent study conducted with AID's approval proved that vitamin C is stable during the cooking process, the Committee believes no further studies should be undertaken. Thus, fortification levels of vitamin C should be increased for the corn soy blend [CSB] and wheat soy blend [WSB] exports. Studies show the health benefits of fortifying foods at the RDA levels especially for new mothers and infants.

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--> The Committee directs AID to perform a pilot program, as recommended in the House Committee report, utilizing up to $500,000 to increase the vitamin C fortification to the RDA level (90 mg per 1 gram ration for pregnant and lactating women) for CSB and WSB and other exported grains and cereals AID will report back to the Committee by April 1, 1996, regarding the progress and any available results of the pilot program. <><><><><><><><><><><><>