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TABLE 5-2 Food Groups Providing Riboflavin in the Diets of U.S. Men and Women Aged 19 Years and Older, CSFII, 1995a

 

Contribution to Total Riboflavin Intakeb (%)

Foods Within the Group that Provide at Least 0.3 mg of Riboflavinc per Serving

Food Group

Men

Women

0.3–0.7 mg

> 0.7 mg

Food groups providing at least 5% of total riboflavin intake

Milk and milk drinksd

14.5

16.0

Milk and milk products

Fortified milk drinks

Bread and bread products

10.8

11.2

Mixed foodse

9.1

6.7

NAf

NA

Ready-to-eat cereals

8.7

10.9

Moderately fortified

Highly fortified

Mixed foods, main ingredient is grain

7.9

6.6

NA

NA

Riboflavin from other food groups

Pasta, rice, and cooked cereals

2.1

2.4

Instant oatmeal

Pork

2.0

1.7

Pork cutlet and spareribs

Finfish

0.7

0.9

Trout

Organ meats

0.7

0.8

Liver, kidney, and heart

Soy-based supplements and meal replacements

0.6

0.2

Soy-based meat replacements

Lamb, veal, game, and other carcass meat

0.3

0.2

Veal chop and venison

a CSFII = Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals.

b Contribution to total intake reflects both the concentration of the nutrient in the food and the amount of the food consumed. It refers to the percentage contribution to the American diet for both men and women based on 1995 CSFII data.

c 0.3 mg represents 20% of the Recommended Daily Intake (1.7 mg) of riboflavin—a value set by the Food and Drug Administration.

d Includes yogurt.

e Includes sandwiches and other foods with meat, poultry, or fish as the main ingredient.

f NA = not applicable. Mixed foods were not considered for this table.

SOURCE: Unpublished data from the Food Surveys Research Group, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1997.



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