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was stated to be 3.2, 4.5, and 5.6 mg, respectively. However, the published plot of these data suggests that excretion averaged closer to 4 and 5 mg/day at the 2.8 and 7.8 mg/day intakes, respectively, lending some uncertainty to the results. From the regression equation given relating intake to urinary excretion, a pantothenic acid intake of approximately 4 mg/day would result in a similar amount of urinary excretion of this vitamin. Because of uncertainties in the accuracy of the published values in foods used to estimate intakes, small number of subjects studied, and lack of information about the effects of intake on the efficiency of absorption and storage of the vitamin, these results can only be used to support the adequacy of the AI and not to set an EAR and RDA.

There is no information on pantothenic acid requirements of middle-age adults aged 31 through 50. The AI for younger adults, 5 mg/day, is therefore recommended for the age range 19 through 50 years. Similarly, there is no basis for determining a separate recommendation based on gender, so the AIs for men and women are the same.

Pantothenic Acid AI Summary, Ages 19 through 50 Years

AI for Men

19–30 years

5 mg/day of pantothenic acid

31–50 years

5 mg/day of pantothenic acid

AI for Women

19–30 years

5 mg/day of pantothenic acid

31–50 years

5 mg/day of pantothenic acid

Adults Ages 51 Years and Older

Evidence Considered in Setting the AI

In a study of 65 noninstitutionalized men and women aged 65 years or older (mean age 73 years), pantothenic acid intakes from food averaged 2.9 mg/1,000 kcal, or 5.9 ± 0.1 (standard error) mg/ day (range 2.5 to 9.5 mg/day) (Srinivasan et al., 1981). Sixty percent of these elderly consumed supplements that increased this usual intake by 17 mg/day. The supplements did not, however, increase blood concentrations of the vitamin. Urinary pantothenic acid excretion of unsupplemented individuals averaged 6 mg/day. These data support the adequacy of the 5.9 mg/day intake from diet alone. There was no change in urinary excretion with age. Because there



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